Back Matter

References

This bibliography is in two parts:

(A) External Contributions to the Review; and

(B) General Literature on PRSPs.

A. External Contributions to the Review

  • Action Aid, “Submission to the PRSP Review,” Washington, D.C.: Action Aid, 2002.

  • African Development Bank, “Contributions to the PRSP Review,” Abidjan: African Development Bank, December 26, 2001.

  • Asian Development Bank, “Contribution to PRSP Review,” Manila: ADB, 2001.

  • Barungi, Barbara Mbire, “Review of the PRSP Approach in Rwanda,” Kigali: October 2001. Available at http://www.worldbank.org/poverty/strategies/review/extrev.htm#Other

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bundesministerium für Wirtschaftliche Zusammenarbeit und Entwicklung (BMZ), “German Contribution to World Bank/IMF PRSP/PRGF Review,” Berlin: BMZ, 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), “CIDA’s Experience With the PRSP Process in Bolivia,” Ottawa, 2001.

  • Catholic Relief Services, “Review of PRSP Initiative Based Upon Experiences/Comments of CRS Partners in Bolivia/Honduras/Zambia/Cameroon,” Washington, D.C.: CRS, December 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Christian Aid, “Ignoring the Experts: Poor People’s Exclusion from Poverty Reduction Strategies,” prepared in partnership with Instituto de Estudos Socioeconómicos, Rede Brasil, Mozambique Debt Group, Link, Centro de Estudios para el Desarrollo, Laboral y Agrario, Union Nacional de Instituciones para el Trabajo Social, London: Christian Aid, 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Christian Aid, “Response to Key Questions for the Review,” London: Christian Aid, 2001.

  • Cling, Jean-Pierre, M. Razafindrakoto, F. Roubaud editors—“Les Nouvelles strategies internationals de lutte contra la pauvrete,” Paris: Dial, 2002.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs (DANIDA), “Contribution to the PRSP Review,” Copenhagen: DANIDA, 2001.

  • Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs (DANIDA), “Burkina Faso PRSP Review,” Copenhagen: DANIDA, 2001.

  • Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs (DANIDA), “Review of PRS Processes in Tanzania,” Copenhagen: DANIDA, 2001.

  • Department for International Development/United Kingdom, “PRSP Review/DFID Views on PRSP Process,” London: DFID, 2001.

  • The European Commission, “PRSP Review: Key Issues-Bretton Woods Institutions Inquiry,” Brussels: EC, 2001.

  • The European Commission, “Study on Conditionality in the Budget Support for Poverty Reduction Financing Proposals,” Brussels: EC, 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • European Network on Debt and Development, “Extracts from ‘Many Dollars Any Change?’: Eurodad’s Input into the PRSP Review,” Brussels: Eurodad, 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Forner, Patricia, “Voice of Business Community in PRSPs,” London: World Vision, 2001.

  • French Authorities, “French Memorandum on PRSPs,” Paris: Government of France, 2001.

  • Gulube, Thomas, “Input into the Zambia PRSP Process,” Lusaka: 2001, Available at http://www.worldbank.org/poverty/strategies/review/extrev.htm#Other.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • IBIS, North-South Coalition, “Input for the PRSP Review: Poverty Reduction and Participation,” Copenhagen: IBIS, 2001.

  • Inter-American Development Bank, “IDB Contribution to Review of the PRSP Approach,” Washington, D.C.: IDB, 2001.

  • International Conference of Free Trade Unions (ICFTU), “Submission to IMF/WB Review on PRSP Process,” Brussels: ICFTU, 2001.

  • International Labor Organization (ILO), “The Decent Work Agenda and Poverty Reduction: ILO Contribution to IMF/W orld Bank Comprehensive Review of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Process”, Geneva: ILO, 2002.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Jubilee South, “Flawed Thinking/Failing Experiences,” Quezon City: Jubilee South, 2001.

  • Nicaraguan Non-Governmental Organizations, “Letter to the Bank/Fund Executive Directors on the PRSP Process,” Managua: 2001.

  • Nyamugasira, Warren, and Rick Rowden, “Do WB’s PRSC/IMF’s PRGF actually support the poverty-reduction goals outlined in Uganda’s Poverty Eradication Action Plan (PEAP/PRSP)?” Kampala: Uganda National NGO Forum, Results Education Fund, and Action Aid, 2002.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Development Assistance Committee (OECD/DAC), “Input Into PRSP Review,” Paris: OECD, 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Oxfam International, “Are PRSPs Working? Oxfam’s Contribution to the World Bank/IMF PRSP Review Process,” London: OXFAM, 2001.

  • Rao, Musunuru Sam, “Comprehensive Review of PRSP Approach,” Evanston: 2001. Available at http://www.worldbank.org/poverty/strategies/review/extrev.htm#Other.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Save the Children UK, “Submission to the IMF/World Bank review of PRSPs,” London: Save the Children, 2001.

  • Sisule, Tony, “Poverty in the Eyes of Poor Kenyans: An Insight Into the PRSP Process,” Nairobi: 2001. Available at http://www.worldbank.org/poverty/strategies/review/extrev.htm#Other.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Strategic Partnership With Africa (SPA), “Survey of SPA Donors’ Support for PRSs,” SPA, 2001.

  • Strategic Partnership With Africa (SPA), “PRSP Indicators and Monitoring Systems,” Prepared by David Booth, London: SPA, 2001.

  • Strategic Partnership With Africa (SPA), “PRSP Institutionalization Study: Third Progress Report,” London: SPA, 2001.

  • Strategic Partnership With Africa (SPA), “PRSPs in Africa: Results of a Study Inquiring Into the Institutionalization of PRSPs in Eight Countries,” London: SPA, 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Strategic Partnership With Africa (SPA), “World Bank/IMF Review of PRSPs,” Input From the Co-Chairs, SPA, 2001.

  • United Nations, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), “The PRSP Approach: A Preliminary Assessment,” Rome: FAO, 2001.

  • United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, “An UNCTAD Contribution to the IMF/World Bank Comprehensive Review of Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSPS): The PRSP Approach and Poverty Reduction in Least Developed Countries,” Geneva: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, 2002.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM), Contribution to PRSP Review,” New York: UNIFEM, 2001.

  • United Nations Development Program, “UNDP Review of the PRSPs,” New York: United Nations Development Program, 2001.

  • United Nations Development Program Bolivia, “Evaluation of the Bolivia PRSP,” La Paz: United Nations Development Program, 2001.

  • United Nations Development Program Lao People’s Democratic Republic, “Toward a Strategy of Consultation in PRSP,” New York: United Nations Development Program, 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • United States Agency for International Development, Presentation on PRSPs, Washington, D.C.: January 16, 2002. Available at http://www.worldbank.org/poverty/strategies/review.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • World Health Organization, “Submission to World Bank/International Monetary Fund Review of PRSP: Health in PRSPs,” Geneva: WHO, 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • World Vision, “Submission to the Comprehensive Review of the PRSP Approach,” London: World Vision, 2001.

B. General Literature on PRSPs

  • Bertelsen, Mette Frost and Soren Kirk Jensen, “Poverty Reduction Strategies: A Possibility for Participatory Policymaking? The Central American Experience: Preliminary Report—The Case of Nicaragua,” Roskilde: University of Roskilde and European Network on Debt and Development, 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Booth, D. and Lucas, H, “Desk Study of Good Practice in the Development of PRSP Indicators and Monitoring Systems: Initial Review of PRSP Documentation,” London: SPA, 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Casson, K and Grindle, M, “Governance and Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers,” London: DFID, 2001.

  • Cheru, Feru., “What are the Secrets for its Success?: Uganda’s Experience with the PRSP Process,” Addis Abada, Ethiopia, African Learning Group on Poverty Reduction Strategies, Economic Commission for Africa, 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Coyle, Erin and Alison Evans, “Donor Engagement with National PRSP Processes,” London: Strategic Partnership with Africa, 2001.

  • Devarajan, Shanta, David Dollar, and Tony Holmgren, “Aid and Reform in Africa: Lessons from Ten Case Studies,” Washington, D.C.: World Bank, 2000.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Diop, M., “The Experience of Mali: Strategic Framework for Poverty Reduction,” Bamako: African Learning Group on Poverty Reduction Strategies, Economic Commission for Africa, 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Eberlei, Walter, “Institutionalized Participation in Processes beyond the PRSP,” Berlin: Deutsche Gesellschaft für Tehnische Zusammenarbei, 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Evans, Alison, “Spatial Considerations in National Poverty Reduction Strategies—A Working Paper,” Prepared for Department for International Development, London: ODI, 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • General Accounting Office (US), “Report on the PRGF,” Washington, D.C.: GAO, 2001.

  • Hughes, Alexandra, Josh Levene, and Rosemary McGee, “Assessing Participation in PRSPs: A Desk-Based Synthesis of Experience in Sub-Saharan Africa,” Sussex: University of Sussex, 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • IMF, “Review of the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility—Issues and Options,” Washington, D.C.: IMF, 2002.

  • IMF/World Bank, “Actions to Strengthen the Tracking of Poverty-Related Spending in Heavily Indebted Poor Countries,” Washington, D.C.: World Bank, SM/02/30 or IDA/SecM2002-0030, 2002.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • IMF/World Bank, “Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers: Operational Issues,” World Bank and IMF, SM/99/290, 1999.

  • IMF/World Bank, “Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers: Progress in Implementation,” Washington, D.C.: World Bank and IMF, EBS/00/167, 2000.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • IMF/World Bank, “Strengthening IMF and World Bank Collaboration on Country Programs and Conditionality,” Washington, D.C.: World Bank and IMF, (SECM2001-0461/1), 2000.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Klasen, Stefan, “In Search of the Holy Grail: How to Achieve Pro-Poor Growth?,” Munich: University of Munich, 2001.

  • Manuel, Marcus, “HIPC Debt Relief to Poverty Reduction,” Prepared for Strategic Partnership with Africa, London: SPA, 2001.

  • McGee, Rosemary, and Norton, Andrew, “Participation in Poverty Reduction Strategies: A Synthesis of Experience with Participatory Approaches to Policy Design, Implementation, and Monitoring,” IDS Working Paper 109, Sussex: IDS, 2000.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Njinkeu, Dominique, “Treatment of Pro-poor Growth in PRSPs,” African Economic Research Consortium, Nairobi, Kenya: 2001.

  • Norton, Andrew and Foster, Michael, “The Potential of Using Sustainable Livelihoods Approaches in PRSPs,” London: Overseas Development Institute, 2000.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Robb, Caroline, “Can the Poor Influence Policy? Participatory Poverty Assessments in the Developing World,” Second Edition, Washington, D.C., IMF/World Bank Joint Publication, 2002.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Robb, Caroline and Allison Scott, “Reviewing Some Early Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers in Africa,” Washington, D.C.: IMF Policy Discussion Paper No. 01/5, 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Scott, Allison, “Poverty Reduction Strategies in Conflict Countries,” Washington, D.C.: International Monetary Fund, 2001.

  • Thin, N., Underwood, M. and Gilling, J., “Sub-Saharan Africa’s PRSPs from Social Policy and Sustainable Livelihoods Perspectives,” London: DFID, 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • UNAIDS “AIDS in the first generation of Interim PRSPs and PRSPs in Africa.” Available at www.unaids.org/debt/AIDSPovNews0401en.doc, April 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Verheul, Ellen, and Glynis Cooper for Wemos, “Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers: What is at Stake for Health?,” Amsterdam: Wemos, 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Walford, Veronica, “Health in PRSPs-An Introduction and Early Experience,” London: DFID, UK, 2001.

  • Wangwe, Samuel, “Experiences and Lessons from Tanzania: PRSP Strategy Paper,” Addis Abada, Ethiopia, African Learning Group on Poverty Reduction Strategies, Economic Commission for Africa, 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • World Bank, “Assessing Aid: What Works, What Doesn’t, and Why,” Washington, D.C.: World Bank, 1998.

  • World Bank, “Poverty Reduction Strategy Sourcebook.” Available at http://www.worldbank.org/poverty/strategies/index2001.

  • World Bank, “Comprehensive Development Framework: Meeting the Promise? Early Experience and Emerging Issues,” Washington, D.C.: World Bank, 2001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
1

For the latest report on CDF see Comprehensive Development Framework: Meeting the Promise? Early Experience and Emerging Issues, September 27, 2001, SecM2001-0529/1.

2

Studies include Participation, Poverty Analysis, Macroeconomics, Conflict-Affected Countries, Environment, Gender, Private Sector and Infrastructure, Rural Poverty, Governance, Education, Health, and Social Protection.

3

Status Reports were to indicate the progress in developing the full PRSP and any revisions, and note additional steps being taken—including seeking technical assistance—to complete the full PRSP. See Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers—Progress in Implementation, SM/01/268, 9/27/01 and Annex 1.

4

Africa (22), Europe and Central Asia (8), East Asia (4), Latin America (4), the Middle East (2), and South Asia (1).

5

Countries requesting access to the Fund’s PRGF must have submitted either an I-PRSP, a PRSP Preparation Status Report, a full PRSP, or a PRSP Progress Report within the previous 12 months.

6

See Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers: Operational Issues, (SM/99/290, 12/10/99) and Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper—Progress in Implementation (EBS/00/167, 8/14/00).

7

Burkina Faso, Mauritania, and Uganda were well advanced in developing their national poverty reduction strategies and completed their first full PRSPs and reached their Decision Points without a self-standing I-PRSP.

8

PFPs were the tripartite documents developed by the government, IMF, and the World Bank as the basis for IMF lending under the Enhanced Structural Adjustment Facility. For each of the ten full PRSP countries, there was a PFP in 1998 or 1999.

9

See Joint Bank/Fund Paper, Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers: Operational Issues, SM/99/290, 12/10/99.

10

In one case (Moldova), a change in government resulted in a hiatus until the new government was in a position to move forward with PRSP preparation.

11

See Joint Bank/Fund Paper, Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers: Operational Issues, SM/99/290, 12/10/99.

12

See, Joint Bank/Fund Paper Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers: Operational Issues, p. 11.

13

For the “retroactive” countries that had achieved Decision Points under the original HIPC Initiative framework, which include Benin, Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Guyana, Mali, Mozambique, Senegal, and Uganda, completion of the full PRSP—not one year of implementation—is a trigger for the Completion Point. The requirement for “non-retroactive” countries, which include Honduras, Mauritania, Nicaragua, Tanzania, and others is completion of the full PRSP and one year’s satisfactory implementation thereof.

14

Christian Aid, “Responses to Key Questions for the Review,” (2001) noted that “Rarely before has the role of civil society been formally legitimized in this way, or been accorded such high profile,” noting that civil society organizations have “developed skills at a staggering rate.’

15

As noted by DFID, December 2001.

16

According to the Asian Development Bank, 2001, among East Asian countries ownership and participation has been largely confined to the ministries of finance and other central agencies dealing with donor assistance. Food and Agriculture Organization, 2001, (p. 3) makes this point with respect to agriculture ministries. Germany (BMZ) 2001 also makes this point. WHO cites low involvement of Health Ministries.

17

This criticism, as well as many of the other points in this paragraph, is stressed by Christian Aid, 2001b.

18

European Commission, 2001a, and Action Aid, 2002, stressed need to involve parliaments.

19

See Jubilee South, 2001, (p. 5). Although there are country examples: Kenya is among several countries where a range of CSOs were involved.

20

CDF Secretariat, World Bank, 2001, (p. 3) indicates that there has been private-sector participation in about one-third of the PRSP countries.

21

ICFTU, “Submission to IMF/WB Review of the PRSP Approach,” November 2001.

22

UNIFEM, “Contribution to PRSP Review,” November 2001.

23

For detailed discussions of trade union involvement with PRSPs, see ICFTU, “Submission to IMF/WB Review of the PRSP Approach,” November 2001.

24

For example, UNIFEM, 2001, (p. 3).

25

As noted by Hughes, Levene and McGee, October 2001 (pp. 13-14).

26

Eberlei (2001) makes this point (p. 3).

27

USAID mentioned that most field missions are actively engaged in the PRSP process. USAID presentation on PRSPs, (January 16, 2002).

28

SPA, 2001 (pp. 5-6).

29

See, for example Denmark (Danida), 2001a; however, the Asian Development Bank, op cit., indicates that coordination between the World Bank and itself has not been satisfactory in some countries.

30

SPA, 2001 pp. 20-22. Also see EC, op cit., p. 5.

31

See Inter-American Development Bank, 2001.

32

See SPA, op cit., p. 22.

33

Both Uganda and Tanzania were in the midst of implementing large living standards surveys at the time of their PRSPs. Uganda was able (as a result of a concerted data cleaning and analysis effort) to use the 2000 Uganda National Household Survey (UNHS) in its PRSP Progress Report (March 2001). Tanzania’s PRSP Progress Report was able to draw from the 1999 DHS and an incomplete sample of the 2000 Household Budget Survey.

34

United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM), 2001.

35

Robb, 2002.

36

World Vision (2001) cites dissatisfaction with the limited and late planning of social impact assessments.

37

See Njinkeu, 2001.

38

Booth and Lucas, May 2001, p. 1. The EC, 2001 (p. 8) stressed the need for a “few, measurable, timely indicators.”

39

EC, 2001, p. 22.

40

See PRGF review, “Review of the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility - Staff Analyses” for details.

41

Between 200-2005, Nicaragua’s external current account deficit is projected to decline from 33.3 to 22.0 percent of GDP, and international reserves are expected to increase from 3.1 to 3.7 months of imports of goods and services.

42

As discussed in more detail above (paragraphs 62-63), the early full PRSPs are very limited in their presentation of existing or planned PSIA of priority public actions, including the key macroeconomic policies.

43

CIDSE and CARITAS maintain that orthodox structural adjustment policies dominate PRSPs, focusing on “budget austerity, economic growth and free market approaches,” with little consideration of who benefits and who loses from these policies. The World Development Movement and the Pan-African Declaration on PRSPs suggests that PRSPs are a veil for the Bank and the Fund to continue their neo-liberal agenda without any real change in the content or ownership of policies. Save the Children (2001) maintains there is little consideration of macroeconomic alternatives, as does IBIS.

44

Issues related to the quality and usefulness of public expenditure data and the coverage of public expenditure management in PRSPs are discussed in paragraphs 115-119 below.

45

See the PRGF Review for a broader discussion of fiscal choice issues for the full set of PRGF countries.

46

“Poverty-reducing” spending is country specific and follows the definition in the PRSP. PRSPs have defined a range of programs as poverty-reducing, including primary education and health, spending on rural development and on roads. Data are drawn from the PRSPs themselves, or from other documents (such as staff reports or decision point documents). The sample excludes Nicaragua, which is not a PRGF country, and the most recent PRSPs: Albania and Niger.

47

The high projected increase in real per-capita spending in education is affected by Mozambique’s PARPA; without Mozambique, the average increase in real per-capita education spending falls from 14 to 10 percent.

48

Ideally, macroeconomic frameworks can be cast against the backdrop of the MDGs, as adapted to their national circumstances. Measures that would permit the country to meet these objectives were to be fully costed and prioritized within sector-specific strategies that were to be integrated into a medium-term expenditure framework (MTEF) and annual budgets and, in turn, within a consistent macroeconomic framework. Such prioritization would allow the country to define a set of contingency spending measures that could be pursued based on the availability of domestic and external concessional resources. See Macro chapter of the PRS Sourcebook.

49

This is emphasized in DAC, op. cit.

50

This list of issues is drawn primarily from the governance chapter of the World Bank’s PRSP Sourcebook.

51

Casson and Grindle, 2001, and Eurodad, op cit., (p. 8), argue that PRSPs should more comprehensively cover broader political issues relating, for example, to participatory democracy and elections.

52

See also the recent Joint Bank-Fund Board paper on Actions to Strengthen the Tracking of Poverty-Related Spending in Heavily Indebted Poor Countries, SM/02/30 and IDA/SecM2002-0030, January 30, 2002, and the PRGF Review, for a more general discussion.

53

H. Falck, and K. Landfald, “The Poverty Reduction Strategy Process in Mozambique,” PRSP Institutionalization Study, Final Report, (August 2001).

54

ODI, “PRSP Institutionalization Study,” London, U.K.: ODI.

55

UNIFEM (2001) argues that gender is rarely recognized as a crosscutting issue and also objects to many countries’ subsuming the category of women under a broad ‘vulnerable’ group.

56

See UNCTAD, 2000.

57

See also OECD DAC, November 2001.

58

World Bank “Assessing Aid: What Works, What Doesn’t, and Why,” (World Bank, 1998) and Devarajan, et. al. “Aid and Reform in Africa: Lessons from Ten Case Studies, (World Bank, 2000).

59

African Development Bank, December 2001, p. 1.

60

UNDP, UNDP review of the PRSPs” (2001), p. 12.

61

IDB, 2001, p. 5.

62

ADB, 2001, p. 2.

63

World Bank, “Comprehensive Development Framework: Meeting the Promise?,” September 27, 2001, SecM2001-0529/1, p. 19.

64

See IMF-World Bank “Strengthening IMF-World Bank Collaboration on Country Programs and Conditionality,” 2001.

65

Erin Coyle and Alison Evans, “Donor Engagement with National PRSP Processes,” Prepared for Strategic Partnership with Africa, (SPA, October 2001), pp. 11-14.

66

See Interim Guidelines for Poverty Reduction Support Credits, May 2001, on the World Bank’s website (www.worldbank.org/about/whatwedo) under Lending Instruments.

67

The PRSC country documents are available on the World Bank’s website at www.worldbank.org/infoshop.

68

For example, Eurodad expressed concern about the “back-door” policy specification, noting that “there has been a tendency to add extra specifications to policies and reforms” into PRSC documentations that are not in the PRSP. See Eurodad, “Many Dollars, Any Change?”, October 2001, p. 1.

69

See IMF, “Review of the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility—Staff Analyses,” SM/02/51, Supplement 1.

70

See, for example, OECD 2001; DFID, 2001; World Vision, 2001; Catholic Relief Services, 2001; and Eurodad, 2001.

71

The Bank is presently carrying out related work on Low-Income Countries Under Stress (LICUS).

72

The Seminar Series uses video-conferencing to expose resident mission staff and their clients and partners in government, academia, NGOs, and donor agencies to recent intellectual developments, best practice, and current empirical research in the field of PRSPs.

Review of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper Approach - Early Experience with Interim PRSPs and Full PRSPs
Author: International Monetary Fund