Senegal: Second Review Under the Policy Support Instrument and Request for Modification of Assessment Criteria Informational Annex

The Second Review under the policy support instrument (PSI) highlights that Senegal’s economy has remained resilient to the global economic turmoil. In line with the authorities’ new Document of Economic and Social Policies for 2011–15, the 2012 economic program supported under the PSI will target critical bottlenecks in energy and infrastructure, which hinder growth and poverty reduction. The fiscal program will allow the authorities to scale up infrastructure investment, but requires keeping a prudent stance on the rest of the budget.

Abstract

The Second Review under the policy support instrument (PSI) highlights that Senegal’s economy has remained resilient to the global economic turmoil. In line with the authorities’ new Document of Economic and Social Policies for 2011–15, the 2012 economic program supported under the PSI will target critical bottlenecks in energy and infrastructure, which hinder growth and poverty reduction. The fiscal program will allow the authorities to scale up infrastructure investment, but requires keeping a prudent stance on the rest of the budget.

Senegal: Relations with the Fund

(As of October 31, 2011)

I. Membership Status: Joined: August 31, 1962; Article VIII

II. General Resources Account:

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III. SDR Department:

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IV. Outstanding Purchases and Loans:

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V. Latest Financial Arrangements:

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Formerly PRGF.

VI. Projected Payments to Fund2/

(SDR Million; based on existing use of resources and present holdings of SDRs):

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When a member has overdue financial obligations outstanding for more than three months, the amount of such arrears will be shown in this section.

VII. Implementation of HIPC Initiative:

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Assistance committed under the original framework is expressed in net present value (NPV) terms at the completion point, and assistance committed under the enhanced framework is expressed in NPV terms at the decision point. Hence the two amounts cannot be added.

Under the enhanced framework, an additional disbursement is made at the completion point corresponding to interest income earned on the amount committed at the decision point but not disbursed during the interim period.

The MDRI provides 100 percent debt relief to eligible member countries that qualified for the assistance. Grant assistance from the MDRI Trust and HIPC resources provide debt relief to cover the full stock of debt owed to the Fund as of end-2004 that remains outstanding at the time the member qualifies for such debt relief.

IX. Safeguards Assessments:

The Central Bank of West African States (BCEAO) is a common central bank of the countries of the West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU), which includes Senegal. The most recent safeguards assessment of the BCEAO was completed on March 1, 2010. The 2010 update assessment found that the BCEAO continues to have controls in place at the operational level. The overall governance framework needed nonetheless to be strengthened by the addition of an audit committee to ensure that the Board of Directors exercises appropriate oversight over the control structure, including the audit mechanisms and financial statements. The Institutional Reform of the WAMU and the BCEAO completed after the approval of the safeguards report stipulated creation of the Audit Committee, which should now start working. Efforts to implement fully the International Financial Reporting Standards reporting framework should also be pursued.

X. Exchange System:

Senegal is a member of the West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU). The exchange system, common to all members of the union, is free of restrictions on the making of payments and transfers for current international transactions. The union’s common currency, the CFA franc, had been pegged to the French franc at the rate of CFAF 1 = F 0.02. Effective January 12, 1994, the CFA franc was devalued and the new parity set at CFAF 1 = F 0.01. Effective December 31, 1998, the parity was switched to the euro at a rate of CFAF 655.96 = €1.

The authorities confirmed that Senegal had not imposed measures that could give rise to exchange restrictions subject to Fund jurisdiction. They will inform the Fund if any such measure is introduced.

Aspects of the exchange system were also discussed in the February 2010 report on economic developments and regional policy issues of the WAEMU.

XI. Article IV Consultations:

The latest Article IV consultation was completed by the Executive Board on May 24, 2010 (Country Report No.10/165). In concluding the 2010 Article IV consultation, Executive Directors welcomed the broadly satisfactory implementation of the Senegalese authorities’ economic program supported under the PSI and the ESF. While Senegal’s risk of debt distress is low, Directors underscored the need to gradually withdraw the temporary fiscal stimulus and reduce the budget deficit to a level consistent with debt sustainability. They welcomed the authorities’ plans to further strengthen revenue collection and stressed that spending pressures had to be contained to preserve macroeconomic stability and debt sustainability and meet the WAEMU convergence criteria, while safeguarding priority spending. Directors supported efforts to reform public financial management and emphasized the need to maintain the reform momentum. They encouraged the authorities to improve their liquidity and debt management to complement the increasing integrity of their budget framework and expressed concern about program slippages that indicate that closer attention needs to be paid to spending procedures and control mechanism. Directors saw room for further strengthening the authorities’ investment planning and evaluation with a view to ensuring high productivity of government spending. They underscored the need to overcome the weak export performance and to improve competitiveness through a more supportive business climate and better governance that would stimulate private-sector growth. Directors underlined that other complementary policies need to be put in place to regain Senegal’s growth momentum and return to previous growth trajectories. Sustained efforts are required to enhance the financial sector’s contribution to the economy. Directors also encouraged the authorities to implement their energy sector reform plan to limit supply bottlenecks and fiscal risks.

XII. Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) and Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes (ROSC) Participation:

A joint team of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund conducted a mission under the FSAP program in November 2000 and January 2001. The Financial System Stability Assessment (FSSA) was issued in August 2001 (IMF Country Report No. 01/189). An FSAP update was undertaken in June 2004, focusing on development issues (in particular nationwide supply of basic financial services and access of SMEs to credit), in line with the priorities defined in the PRSP (IMF Country Report No. 05/126). A regional FSAP for the WAEMU was undertaken in the second half of 2007.

A ROSC on the data module, based on a September 2001 mission, was published on December 2, 2002. An FAD mission conducted a ROSC on the fiscal transparency module in January 2005.

XIII. Technical Assistance:

A. AFRITAC West

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B. Headquarters

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XIV. Resident Representative

Stationed in Dakar since July 24, 1984. The position has been held by Ms. Valeria Fichera since September 2009.

XV. Anti Money Laundering / Combating the Financing of Terrorism

The onsite visit for Senegal’s AML/CFT evaluation took place in July/August 2007 in the context of ECOWAS’s Inter-Governmental Action Group Against Money Laundering in West Africa (GIABA). The report was adopted in early May 2008 by the GIABA Plenary held in Accra, Ghana. The report highlighted several areas of weaknesses in the AML/CFT system, confirmed by a score of 12 Non-Compliant and 16 Partially Compliant ratings out of the 40+9 FATF AML/CFT Recommendations. GIABA’s First Follow Up Report of 2009 on the implementation of the recommendations contained in the Mutual Evaluation Report mentions that Senegal’s adoption of Uniform Law No. 2009-16 of March 2, 2009 against terrorist financing enables the country to broadly comply with all the Recommendations and Special Recommendations concerning the issue, including customer due diligence (especially as regards politically exposed persons - PEPs). It also notes that legal provisions taken by Senegal in order to prevent the abuse of new technologies, namely the adoption of Law No. 2008–11 of January 25, 2008 on cyber criminality, enable the country to adapt its criminal system and subsequent procedures to crimes related to new information and communication technologies. Senegal joined the Egmont Group of Financial Intelligence Units in May 2009. Since end-June 2011, the FIU (CENTIF) publishes on its website statistics on suspicious transaction reports cases received, the number of cases transmitted to the judiciary as well as the number of convictions. The GIABA Secretariat concludes that Senegal deserves encouragement for its endeavor to reinforce its AML/CFT scheme and recommends, at this juncture, to maintain Senegal within the regular follow-up process, pending the results of measures taken and the adoption of new measures aimed at amending the above-mentioned scheme. The discussion of Senegal’s Third Follow-Up Report was postponed until May 2012 to give the authorities the opportunity to provide more detailed information on the progress made in addressing the remaining deficiencies.

Joint Management Action Plan Implementation

World Bank and International Monetary Fund Collaboration

(Update)

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Statistical Issues

Senegal – Statistical Issues Appendix

As of November 15, 2011

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Senegal: Table of Common Indicators Required for Surveillance

(As of May 15, 2011)

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Includes reserve assets pledged or otherwise encumbered as well as net derivative positions.

Both market-based and officially-determined, including discount rates, money market rates, rates on treasury bills, notes and bonds.

Foreign, domestic bank, and domestic nonbank financing.

The general government consists of the central government (budgetary funds, extra budgetary funds, and social security funds) and state and local governments.

Including currency and maturity composition.

Includes external gross financial asset and liability positions vis-à-vis nonresidents.

Daily (D); Weekly (W); Monthly (M); Quarterly (Q); Annually (A); Irregular (I); Not Available (NA).

Reflects the assessment provided in the data ROSC published in November 2002 and based on the findings of the mission that took place in September 2001 for the dataset corresponding to the variable in each row. The assessment indicates whether international standards concerning (respectively) concepts and definitions, scope, classification/sectorization, and basis for recording are fully observed (O), largely observed (LO), largely not observed (LNO), not observed (NO), or not available (NA).

Same as footnote 8, except referring to international standards concerning (respectively) source data, statistical techniques, assessment and validation of source data, and revision studies.

Estimate.

Reported to staff during mission.

Senegal: Second Review Under the Policy Support Instrument and Request for Modification of Assessment Criteria-Staff Report; Informational Annex; Press Release
Author: International Monetary Fund