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1

This paper is based on the author’s presentation given at the IMF/European Union Seminar held in Brussels on April 2–3, 1998. I wish to thank Paul Chabrier, Saleh Nsouli, Karim Nashashibi, Klaus Enders, Patricia Alonso-Gamo, and participants in the seminar for helpful comments and suggestions.

2

In the case of Tunisia, the issue of increased agricultural access appears to have been less pronounced. The allotted quotas for its main agricultural exports, namely olive oil, citrus fruit and wine, at the Union’s support price (i.e., that are exempt from tariffs and variable levies) were not fully met, with the important exception of olive oil.

Impact of European Union Assocation Agreements on Mediterranean Countries
Author: Mr. Henri C. Ghesquière