Abstract

12.1 The consumer price index (CPI), like all other statistics, may be subject to general error that may occur during any stage of the estimation process but also errors that are unique to the CPI (for example, substitution bias and quality change bias). This chapter first describes the general types of potential errors and the sources of sampling and nonsampling error that arise in estimating a population CPI from a sample of observed prices, and then reviews the arguments made in numerous studies that attribute bias to CPIs as a result of not properly addressing the treatment of quality change, consumer substitution, and other factors. It should be emphasized that many of the underlying issues discussed in this chapter are dealt with in much greater detail elsewhere in the Manual.

Introduction

12.1 The consumer price index (CPI), like all other statistics, may be subject to general error that may occur during any stage of the estimation process but also errors that are unique to the CPI (for example, substitution bias and quality change bias). This chapter first describes the general types of potential errors and the sources of sampling and nonsampling error that arise in estimating a population CPI from a sample of observed prices, and then reviews the arguments made in numerous studies that attribute bias to CPIs as a result of not properly addressing the treatment of quality change, consumer substitution, and other factors. It should be emphasized that many of the underlying issues discussed in this chapter are dealt with in much greater detail elsewhere in the Manual.

12.2 The CPI is subject to various types of errors and biases that affect the precision and accuracy of the CPI estimates. Several potential sources of errors and bias have been identified in the CPI and addressed, though the debate continues over to what extent and in what direction bias may still exist and the ways in which its accuracy can continue to be increased.

Types of Errors

12.3 One of the main objectives of a sample survey is to compute estimates of population characteristics. Such estimates will never be exactly equal to the population characteristics. There will always be some error, and the precision and accuracy of the estimate is affected by both sampling and nonsampling error. Table 12.1 gives a taxonomy of the different types of errors.1 Two broad categories can be distinguished: sampling errors and nonsampling errors.

Table 12.1

A Taxonomy of Errors in a CPI

Sampling Error

12.4 Sampling errors are due to the fact that an estimated CPI is based on samples and not on a complete enumeration of the populations involved. Sampling errors vanish if observations cover the complete population. As mentioned in previous chapters, national statistical offices (NSOs) usually adopt a fixed-weight price index as the object of estimation. A fixed-weight index is a weighted average of partial indices of product groups, with weights being expenditure shares. The estimation procedures that most NSOs apply to a CPI involve different kinds of samples. The most important kinds are the following:

  • For each product group, a sample of items to calculate the partial price index of the product group

  • For each item, a sample of outlets to calculate the elementary price index of the item from individual price observations

  • For each product group, a sample of a day or a time span of the month when the data collection has to be carried out (concerning this issue, the introduction of scanner data, which in general cover more than one week of a month, in CPI compilation could reduce the potential errors arising in the traditional data collection for this dimension of sampling)

  • A sample of households needed for the estimation of the average expenditure shares of the item groups (some countries use alternative sources of data, such as national accounts, instead of a household budget survey [HBS] to obtain the expenditure shares, as described in Chapter 3)

Sampling error can be introduced at any of the stages of the sample selection process. The potential for sampling error is greater in the selection of outlets and even more so for products because there is no comprehensive frame from which to select units for sampling.

12.5 The sampling error can be split into a selection error and an estimation error. A selection error occurs when the actual selection probabilities deviate from the selection probabilities as specified in the sample design. The estimation error denotes the effect caused by using a sample based on a random selection procedure. Every new selection of a sample will result in different elements, and thus in a possibly different value of the estimator.

Nonsampling Error

12.6 CPI surveys involve many operations, all of which are potential sources of nonsampling error. The nonsam-pling errors arise from the survey process, regardless of whether the data are collected from the entire universe or from a sample of the population. They can be subdivided into observation errors and nonobservation errors. Observation errors are the errors made during the process of obtaining and recording the basic observations or responses. The most general categories of observation errors are overcoverage, response error, and processing error.

12.7 Overcoverage means that some elements are included in the survey that do not belong to the target population or target universe. For outlets, NSOs usually have inadequate sampling frames. For example, in some countries, a business register is used as the sampling frame for outlets, where outlets are classified according to the main activity. The register thus usually exhibits extensive over-coverage, because it contains numerous outlets which are out of scope from the CPI perspective (for example, firms that sell to businesses rather than to households). In addition, there is usually no detailed information on all the items sold by an outlet, so it is possible that a sampled outlet may turn out not to sell a particular item at all.

12.8 Response error results from the collection of incorrect, inconsistent, or incomplete data. Response error may arise because of the collection of data from inappropriate respondents, deliberate distortion of responses, interviewer effects, misrecording of responses, pricing of wrong items, misunderstanding or misapplication of data collection procedures, misunderstanding of the questions or survey needs, and lack of cooperation from respondents. In price surveys, where the main price collection method is by price collectors who regularly visit outlets, they may collect prices of unwanted items.

12.9 Processing error occurs after the survey data are collected, during the processes that convert reported data to published estimates and consistent machine-readable information. Each of the processing steps, such as coding, data entry, transfer, and editing (control and correction), can generate errors. For example, at the outlets, the price collectors write down the prices on paper forms or use dedicated software on a tablet or handheld computer. In the first case (paper-and-pencil data collection), after the collectors have returned home, a computer is used as the input and means of transmission for the price information. This way of processing prices is susceptible to errors. The second case (computer-assisted data collection) is less risky because it has built-in validation checks, but it could be susceptible to errors for other reasons such as the lack of adequate controls during the recording of prices. Processing error also fails to identify true errors during regular micro- and macro-editing. Even when errors are discovered, they can be corrected improperly because of inadequate imputation and quality-adjustment procedures. The occurrence of processing errors is strongly influenced by survey planning, and to some extent the survey’s resources (for example, staff and budget, devices, and training) and constraints (for example, elapsed time between data collection and publication).

12.10 Nonobservation errors are made when the intended measurements cannot be carried out. The most general categories of nonobservation errors are undercoverage and nonresponse error. Undercoverage occurs when elements in the target population are not included in the sampling frame used for sample selection. The source of under-coverage error is the sampling frame itself. For instance, it is likely that there are delays in updating the outlet frame to include new in-scope units or to exclude mail order firms and nonfood market stalls from their outlet sampling frame. Undercoverage means that some outlets where relevant items are purchased cannot be contacted.

12.11 Nonresponse is another category of nonobservation error. Nonresponse errors may arise from the failure to obtain the required information in a timely manner from some of the units selected in the sample. A distinction can be drawn between total and partial (or item) nonresponse. Total nonresponse occurs when selected outlets cannot be contacted or refuse to participate in the price survey. Another instance of total nonresponse occurs when mail or electronic questionnaires and collection forms are returned by the respondent and the price collector, respectively, after the deadline for processing has passed. Partial (item) nonresponse occurs when a responding unit does not complete the information on an item or items on the survey questionnaire, or the responses obtained are unusable. Mail or electronic questionnaires and collection forms that are only partially filled in, scanner data with missing information concerning specific outlets or Global Trade Item Numbers (GTINs) in the sample, and web-scraped prices where some information is not downloaded from the internet are examples of partial nonresponse. If the price changes of the nonresponding outlets differ from those of the responding outlets, the quality of the price change estimates will be affected.

12.12 Another source of errors is the failure to measure the price actually paid. This failure may be caused, for example, by the use of list prices (for example, for cars) and by the presence of discounts, coupons, or bargaining, which are typically not accounted for or difficult to measure. In many countries, the discounting of prices is becoming more common and the importance of discounted prices is increasing. Another source of error is due to the tendency of price collectors to choose an excessive proportion of regularly priced varieties in the price reference period, whereas the proportion of sales prices increases later and becomes proportional to their real share later in the year.

Measuring Error

Estimation of Variance

12.13 The variance estimator depends on both the chosen estimator of a CPI and the sampling design. The 2012 International Labor Organization Survey of country practices2 gives an overview of the sampling methods that were applied in the compilation of CPIs by NSOs. It found that only one out of three NSOs use some sort of probability techniques for location selection, 1 in 5 for outlet selection, and only 1 in 10 uses probability sampling for item selection. In the absence of probability techniques, so-called judgmental and cutoff selection methods are applied.

12.14 In view of the complexity of the sample designs in compiling a CPI (where the samples of locations, outlets, items, and varieties are just partially connected), an integrated approach to variance estimation can be problematic. Therefore, it appears to be difficult to present a single formula for measuring the variance of a CPI, which captures all sources of sampling error. It is, however, feasible to develop partial (or conditional) measures, in which only the effect of a single source of variability is quantified. For instance, Balk and Kersten (1986) calculated the variance of a CPI resulting from the sampling variability of the HBS, conditional on the assumption that the partial price indices are known with certainty. Ideally, all the conditional sampling errors should be put together in a unified framework to assess the relative importance of the various sources of error. Under rather restrictive assumptions, Balk (1989a) derived an integrated framework for the overall sampling error of a CPI.

12.15 There are various procedures for estimating the sampling variance arising from a probability sampling design. For instance, assuming a cross-classified sampling design in which samples of items and outlets are drawn independently from a two-dimensional population, with probabilities proportional to size (PPS) in both dimensions, a variance formula can be derived. Where an overall estimate of the sampling variance cannot be made, at the very least, a basic analysis should be conducted.

12.16 The main problem with nonprobability sampling is that there is no theoretically acceptable way of knowing whether the dispersion in the sample data accurately reflects the dispersion in the population. It is then necessary to rely on approximation techniques for variance estimation. One such technique is quasi-randomization (see Särndal and others [1992, 574]), in which assumptions are made about the probabilities of sampling items and outlets. The problem with this method is that it is difficult to find a probability model that adequately approximates the method actually used for outlet and item selection. Another possibility is to use a replication method, such as the method of random groups, balanced half-samples, jackknife, or bootstrap. This is a completely nonparametric class of methods to estimate sampling distributions and standard errors. Each replication method works by drawing a large number of subsamples from the given sample. From each subsample, the parameter of interest can be estimated. Under rather weak conditions, it can be shown that the distribution of the resulting estimates approximates the sampling distribution of the original estimator. For more details on the replication methods, see Särndal and others (1992, 418–445).

Qualitative Assessment of Nonsampling Errors

12.17 As estimating the quantitative impact of the non-sampling errors is more difficult, a qualitative assessment should be provided. For instance, the coverage of the sampling frames as a proxy of the target populations can be described and provided (including gaps, duplications, and definitional problems). The percentage of the target outlet samples from which responses or usable price data were obtained (that is, the response rates) can be provided. Any known difference in the prices of responding outlets and non-responding outlets can be described, as can an indication of the method of imputation or estimation used to compensate for nonresponse. Other examples of qualitative measures of nonsampling errors are indicators such as implicit quality indices, which compare indices with and without prices adjusted for quality changes. Similarly, the effects of editing can be measured by comparing the CPI estimates based on edited and nonedited data sets. As processing errors tend not to be well-reported or well-documented, they are seldom treated in the survey research literature. The occurrence of processing errors can be reduced through survey process improvements. Several categories of nonsampling errors provide the bulk of the bias issues discussed in paragraphs 12.30–12.73.

Procedures to Minimize Errors

12.18 The estimation error can be controlled and minimized by means of the sampling design. For example, by increasing the sample size, or by taking selection probabilities proportional to some well-chosen auxiliary variable, the error in the estimated CPI can be reduced. The choice of an adequate sampling design for the CPI is an extremely complex matter (see Dorfman and others [2006]). The target population is the set of all goods and services that are acquired, used, or paid for by households from outlets in a particular period. A proper probability sampling procedure selects a sample by a random mechanism in which each good or service in the population has a known probability of selection. In combination with a Horvitz–Thompson estimator,3 such a probability sampling design will produce an index that is (approximately) unbiased and precise.

12.19 The probability sampling designs used extensively in survey practice are simple random sampling and PPS sampling, with or without some form of stratification (more details are provided in Chapter 4). The advantage of simple random sampling is its simplicity; it gives each population element the same probability of being included in the sample. PPS sampling has the advantage that the more important elements have a larger chance of being sampled than the less important ones. For instance, in one European NSO, the outlets are selected with probabilities proportional to some proxy for size, namely their number of employees. Unequal probability designs can lead to a substantial variance reduction in comparison with equal probability designs. In stratified sampling, the population is divided into nonoverlapping subpopulations called strata. For instance, in another European NSO, the population of outlets is split into two outlet types (chain and independent) to form different strata by region. In each stratum, a sample is selected by PPS sampling or simple random sampling. One of the reasons why stratification is so popular is that, if strata are well constructed, it results in low variance of the price changes within a stratum. Stratification is a useful strategy to make the sample more efficient.

12.20 Because appropriate sampling frames are generally not available, samples are frequently obtained by non-probability methods. Judgmental (or purposive) sampling is one form of nonrandom selection. In this case, someone with knowledge on where households make expenditure (for example, data collector) selects certain “typical” locations and outlets where data are to be collected. With their knowledge, a fairly good sample might result. A more sophisticated nonprobability method is quota sampling. In quota sampling, the population is first divided into certain strata. For each stratum, the number (quota) of locations and outlets to be included in the sample is fixed. Next, the price collector in the field simply fills the quotas, which means in the case of outlet sampling that the selection of the outlets is ultimately based on the judgment of the price collectors. Another nonprobability method is cutoff sampling, which means that a part of the target population is deliberately excluded from the sample selection process. This procedure is used when the distribution of the value of some auxiliary variable is highly skewed. For instance, a large part of the population may consist of small outlets whose contribution to total sales is modest. A decision may then be taken to exclude from the sampling frame the outlets with the lowest sales. Because the selection is nonrandom, nonprobability methods usually lead to biased estimates. Empirical results of research presented in de Haan and others (1997) nevertheless show that nonprobability selection methods do not necessarily perform worse, with regard to the mean square error, than probability sampling techniques.

12.21 Provided that the sampling design is given, the sampling variance of an estimated (all-items) CPI can in general be lowered by:

  • Enlarging the samples of items and outlets

  • The application of suitable stratifications to the various populations (for example, grouping items with respect to similarity of price changes)

12.22 It is important to allocate optimally the available resources both between and within the different CPI samples, since badly allocated samples may lead to unnecessarily high sampling errors. Dalén and Ohlsson (1995) show that the error resulting from item sampling is relatively high compared with the error resulting from outlet sampling. In this case, it is worthwhile increasing the sample size of items and reducing the sample size of outlets. Beisteiner (2008) stresses the importance of allocating resources to those areas where the effect on the quality of the all-items CPI is maximized, especially to goods and services with a high relative expenditure weight and to goods and services with high dispersion of prices. The paper presents a “ready-to-use” formula, the Neyman formula, for the allocation of the sample, which optimizes the precision of the CPI for given resources, as discussed in Chapter 4.

12.23 A systematic analysis of sampling errors offers possibilities for improving efficiency or reducing cost. The problem of optimum sample allocation is usually formulated as the determination of the sizes of the samples of items and outlets, and their distribution over the strata that minimizes the sampling error of an all-items CPI, subject to the available budget.

12.24 The accuracy of the CPI could be improved by making use of scanner data, which collect more prices for more varieties on more days of the month than traditional data collection methods. Bradley (1996) discusses the potential for scanner data to reduce the sampling error of the corresponding official CPI component index. The use of scanner data also has a positive effect on the time dimension of sampling, covering a time span much longer than the one covered by the traditional data collection. In Chapter 10, it is argued that scanner data should cover the whole period for which CPI is constructed, rather than a subperiod. In some cases, the use of scanner data removes the need for sampling as a census of products can be used.

12.25 As already mentioned, a business register can be subject to overcoverage when used as a sampling frame for outlets. Often, they include outlets that are no longer in business or have changed the activity. Other sources, described in more detail in Chapter 4, can be used as a sampling frame. In the absence of any reliable source of data that can be used as a sampling frame, it is recommended to set up an appropriate sampling frame by enumeration of the main outlets within each sampled location. Such enumeration yields a list of all outlets in a location together with the item groups that belong to their assortments. When formal sampling techniques cannot be applied, outlets can be selected using judgmental methods. For example, a more judgmental approach to organizing an outlet sampling frame is to ask the price collectors—who may be assumed to know the local situation well—to make a list of outlets where purchases are made by households. It is important that information about the quality of the sampling frame, with regard to overcoverage or undercoverage, and its completeness for the target population is known.

12.26 The populations of items (and varieties) and outlets are continually changing through time. The composition of most item groups is not constant over time, because items disappear from the market and new ones appear. The outlet population also changes over time: outlets close, temporarily or permanently; new outlets open; and the importance of some outlets diminishes or increases. The samples of items (and varieties) and outlets should be reviewed and updated periodically to maintain their representativity with respect to the current expenditure patterns of the households. In many countries, these are reviewed and updated every year.

12.27 Measurement errors by price collectors can be reduced by providing them with handheld computers or tablets for data entry that have integrated validation checks. In this way, the validation and editing of observed prices can be executed at the point of price collection (that is, in the outlet) by comparing the currently observed price quote with the previously observed one (by setting a limit on the percentage price change) and with the price quotes obtained from other outlets (by setting suitable upper and lower limits). Details are provided in Chapter 5 on the use of handheld computers and tablets for price collection. Although using pricing forms that contain information on the previous period’s price can reduce response variance, it may also cause response bias and delay in reporting price change. Before introducing handheld computers and tablets, proper usability testing and training for price collectors are required to avoid them being a source of error.

12.28 It is useful to appoint data collection supervisors to conduct quality assurance checks on the price collectors. It is also a good idea to organize regular meetings where price collectors and CPI compilers from the head office can share their experiences. In this way, the compilers will keep in touch with the conditions in the field and may take the opportunity to provide more information about frequently made price collection errors and new representative products.

12.29 It is important to check the collected price data for processing errors and, where possible, to correct these errors. This activity is called data editing. The first stage of editing includes the review and validation of individual observations. When the resources to spend on data editing must be minimized, while at the same time maintaining a high level of data quality, selective editing and a broad review of the compiled data are possibilities. Selective editing is a form of traditional micro-editing in which the number of edits is kept to a minimum. Only those edits that have an impact on the survey results are carried out. A review of the compiled indices offers a top-down approach. The edits are carried out on aggregated data (for example, the price index numbers of an item group) instead of individual records (for example, price observations). A review of individual records is then carried out only if the top-down review raises suspicion. Attention should particularly be paid to outliers among the observations (more information on data editing and the use of algorithms is provided in Chapter 5; a comprehensive description of statistical data editing procedures is given in De Waal and others [2011]).

12.30 Nonresponse reduces sample size, results in increased variance, and usually introduces selection bias. Nonresponse rates, or missing observations, are often viewed as a proxy for the quality of a survey. While nonresponse rates are important, imputation rates alone provide no indication of nonresponse bias. There are three methods for the treatment of missing price observations. First, the corresponding price can be excluded from the data set of previous period prices, so that the set of previous period prices is “matched” with the set of current prices. Second, this matching can be achieved by using an imputed (or artificial) price for the missing one. The imputed price can be calculated by either carrying forward the previous price observation or by extrapolating the previous price observation using the change of other price observations for the same item. Third, there is the possibility to reweight the sample to minimize the effect of nonresponse error. The objective of reweighting is to inflate the weight given to the prices of the responding outlets. This compensates for those prices that are lost by nonresponse (for details, including advantages and disadvantages of each approach, see Chapter 6).

Types of Bias

12.31 Bias is defined as a systematic tendency for the calculated CPI to diverge from some ideal or preferred index, resulting from the method of data collection or processing, or the index formula used. This section reviews several categories of systematic error, either in pricing or in index construction, that potentially can lead to bias in the all-items CPI. The emphasis here is on the categorization of different types of bias, along with some consideration of their likely size, but also on methods to reduce or eliminate these categories of bias. The question might arise of why such a discussion is necessary, since such issues as quality change, and the appropriate methods for handling them in the CPI, are dealt with at both a conceptual and operational level in other chapters (see Chapter 8 of the publication Consumer Price Indices Theory).

12.32 The reason why this chapter addresses the topic of CPI bias is the great surge in interest in price measurement problems during the mid-1990s. Especially in the United States (US), the view became widespread that the CPI was subject to systematic upward biases because of the failure to deal adequately with product substitution by consumers, product quality improvements, and the introduction of new goods and services. Moreover, it was recognized, first, that the existence of such upward bias would have fundamental implications for the measurement of recent trends in output and productivity, and second, that the elimination of upward bias could substantially improve the government budget situation through reduced government expenditure and increased tax revenue (see, for example, Eldridge [1999] and Duggan and Gillingham [1999]). These findings led to a series of papers and reports on CPI measurement problems, often accompanied by point estimates of aggregate bias.

12.33 One of the most prominent examples of these quantitative studies of bias is that by the Advisory Commission to Study the CPI (US Senate 1996).4 Responses and estimates by statistical agencies include those provided by Abraham and others (1998), US Bureau of Labor Statistics (1998), Ducharme (1997), Edwards (1997), Fenwick (1997), Johnson and others (2006), Lequiller (1997), Moulton (1996b), and Moulton and Moses (1997). Research undertaken has shown that it is difficult to both quantify and assess the direction of potential bias, and that the extent, the direction, and even the existence of bias remain something that will depend upon the specific circumstances of each set of CPI estimates and cannot always be determined with certainty.

12.34 Two points are worth making at the outset with respect to measuring bias in CPIs. First, the issue has usually been addressed in the context of the cost of living index (COLI). That is, the CPI bias has been defined as the difference between the rate of increase in the CPI and the rate of increase in a true COLI. Many discussions on bias have taken as given that the COLI should be the CPI’s measurement objective. Somewhat different conclusions might be reached if the index objective was taken to be a fixed-basket price index. Notably, the gains in consumer welfare from a widening array of new products, or the ability of consumers to substitute away from items with increasing relative prices, might be deemed irrelevant and an index that ignored those factors might not be judged biased on that account.

12.35 The second point is that CPI bias is not amenable to estimation with the same level of rigor as that used in CPI variance estimation. Since the COLI or other ideal target index is unobserved, analysts have been forced to rely in part on conjectures and on generalizations from fragmentary empirical evidence to quantify the extent of bias. The notable exception is with respect to substitution bias, when indices using superlative formulas can be computed using the same underlying price and expenditure data and compared with historical CPI data to estimate the upward bias from use of the traditional formulas.

12.36 Several different taxonomies of bias have appeared in the literature mentioned previously. It is sufficient, however, to employ four categories roughly corresponding to those set forth in the best-known study, namely the Final report of the Advisory Commission to Study the CPI (the Boskin Commission), established by the US Senate Finance Committee in 1995. These categories are upper-level substitution bias; elementary aggregate bias; quality change and new goods bias; and new outlet bias.

12.37 These categories can be further broken down into two subgroups according to whether they refer to errors in individual price measurements or errors in computing index series. Quality change bias and new goods bias arise because of failures to measure adequately the value to consumers of individual goods and services that appear in (or disappear from) the marketplace. It should be recognized that discussions of “new goods” problems apply equally to all products, whether goods or services. At a conceptual level, it can be difficult to distinguish these two biases from each other. Operationally, however, quality change bias pertains to the procedures for comparing new products or models with the older products they replace in the CPI samples. In general, new goods bias can be thought of as applying to entirely new types of products, or products that would not enter samples routinely through forced replacement. New outlet bias, sometimes referred to as outlet substitution bias, is similar to new goods bias but is focused on the appearance of new types of outlets or marketing methods that offer goods and services at lower prices or higher quality.

12.38 The other categories of bias refer to the procedures for constructing index values from component series. As noted throughout this Manual, CPI compilation can be thought of as taking place in two steps, or at two levels. At the lower level, individual price quotations are combined; at the upper level, these elementary indices are aggregated together. Corresponding to these two levels are two forms of potential bias. Elementary aggregate bias involves the averaging formulas used to combine price quotations into elementary indices. Upper-level substitution bias applies to the formulas used to combine those elementary aggregates into higher-level indices. These components of potential bias, and the means used to measure them, are discussed in more detail in paragraphs 12.38–12.72.

Components of Bias

Upper-Level Substitution Bias

12.39 Upper-level substitution bias is perhaps the most widely accepted source of CPI bias, and the kind with which economists are most familiar from literature on price index theory and practice. Simply stated, it arises when CPIs employ the Laspeyres formula, which is well known to provide an upper bound on a COLI under certain assumptions about consumer behavior (see Chapter 4 of the publication Consumer Price Index Theory), or a similar method that uses a fixed-base or -basket index, like the Lowe and Young formulas. The assumption in the definition of the Laspeyres-type price index is that substitution among goods is zero, which is against one of the cornerstones in the theory of consumer demand. Quantitative measures of upper-level substitution bias can be generated by comparing Laspeyres-type price indices to Fisher ideal, Törnqvist, or other superlative indices. Under certain assumptions about, for example, constant preferences, these will stand as relatively precise bias estimates.

12.40 Genereux (1983) and Aizcorbe and Jackman (1993) provide such index comparisons and estimates of upper-level substitution bias using actual CPI series for Canada and the United States, respectively. Other early studies by Braithwait (1980) and Manser and McDonald (1988) estimate the substitution bias in US national account indices. Instead of superlative indices, the Braithwait study uses estimated exact COLIs based on demand system estimation. A similar estimate for the Netherlands is provided by Balk (1990). In these studies, and in the more recent analyses of US CPI data by Shapiro and Wilcox (1997a) and Cage and others (2003), the existence of an upward bias from the Laspeyres formula is demonstrated consistently. The biases in the annual index changes in individual years are relatively small, typically 0.3 percentage points or less, and depend empirically on such factors as the distance from the Laspeyres base period, the level of index detail at which the alternative formulas are applied, and whether the superlative index is of the fixed base or chained variety.

12.41 The major differences between Laspeyres and superlative indices rise from the variation in the relative prices over the period being compared, and from the shift in quantities consumed toward those index categories that have fallen in relative price. This leads to several conclusions:

  • If index movements are characterized by continuing, uniform drift in relative prices over time, with accompanying drifts in consumption, the size of the annual Laspeyres bias will tend to increase with the distance from the base period. The estimates of the upper-level substitution bias presented in Australian Bureau of Statistics (2017) show that average annual substitution bias is 0.11 one year after a reweight of the CPI, increasing to 0.20 in the sixth year. Greenlees (1997) notes that there is little evidence for this phenomenon in the United States; see also Szulc (1983).

  • Under the same circumstances, reducing the expenditure weight chaining interval will work to reduce the upper-level substitution bias in the Laspeyres-type CPI. The more frequent chaining will increase the weight given to indices that are falling in relative price, thereby reducing the rate of CPI growth. Conversely, if there is “bouncing” in relative index movements, frequent chaining can lead to an upward “chain drift” in a Laspeyres index.

  • Upper-level substitution bias will tend to be larger during periods of higher inflation, if these periods also have greater relative price variation. However, little empirical evidence exists on this point.

12.42 The concept of upper-level substitution bias has been derived and discussed in the context of COLI theory, but an equivalent bias may be defined from the perspective of the fixed-basket price index. If the Fisher ideal or other superlative index is judged preferable based on its symmetric treatment of base period and current period expenditure patterns, then the difference between that index and a Laspeyres could be interpreted as a measure of representativity bias. A similar argument could be applied with respect to lower-level substitution bias within elementary index aggregates.

12.43 Lebow and Rudd (2003) have defined and estimated another category of bias related to upper-level aggregation. They concluded that the HBS weights used in the United States CPI were subject to error because of, for example, underreporting of alcohol and tobacco expenditures. This will lead to a weighting bias if the errors in relative weight are correlated with component index changes (sources for and problems with expenditure weight estimation are discussed in detail in Chapter 3).

Elementary Aggregate Bias

12.44 Elementary aggregate bias arises from the use of an inappropriate method for aggregating price quotations at the lowest level of aggregation. An elementary index in the CPI is biased if its expectation differs from its measurement objective. This bias can take two forms: formula bias or lower-level substitution bias. The index suffers from formula bias if, as a result of the properties of the formula, the result produced is biased relative to what would have been the result if a price change of a fixed basket could have been estimated. The index suffers from lower-level substitution bias if it does not reflect product substitution by consumers among the items contained in that elementary aggregate. Lower-level substitution error is only relevant where the measurement objective is a COLI. Thus, given any elementary index formula, the two forms of bias can be distinguished according to the objective of the elementary index.

12.45 Chapter 8 of this Manual and Chapter 6 of the publication Consumer Price Index Theory discuss the characteristics and provide detail, an illustration, and the relative merits of the use of different elementary index number formulas. A key finding is that the Carli formula or the arithmetic average of price ratios is unsuitable for a CPI because it is liable to lead to substantial drift in the results, especially when used in its chained form. Therefore, the recommendation is that the Carli formula should not be used, especially in its chained form. The problems with elementary aggregate bias and the methods chosen to address them are discussed, for example, by Reinsdorf (1998), Reinsdorf and Moulton (1997), and Moulton (1996b).

12.46 The ratio of arithmetic mean (Dutot) and geometric mean (Jevons) formulas eliminate formula bias as defined here. Their expectations differ, however, when item prices do not change at a uniform rate. The differences provide one way of evaluating the potential importance of lower-level substitution bias. The geometric mean formula is exact for a COLI if consumers follow the Cobb–Douglas behavioral model (that is, assuming that consumers adjust the relative quantities they consume inversely in proportion to the changes in relative prices so that expenditure shares remain constant), whereas the formula based on the ratio of arithmetic means corresponds to zero-substitution behavior. Thus, if the goal is to approximate a COLI, the geometric mean formula is judged preferable.

12.47 Scanner data provide new opportunities for measuring and addressing elementary aggregate bias. The availability of both prices and quantity information in scanner data remove the need for an unweighted index formula, at least for those items where unit values are available, and allows the calculation of elementary indices by employing superlative formulas. By using scanner data, Gabor and Ver-meulen (2015) compute product category level elementary price indices using nine different index formulas (Carli, Dutot, Jevons, Laspeyres, Paasche, Fisher, Lowe, Geometric Lowe, and expenditure weighted Jevons) and compare the resulting indices with the Fisher index. The main findings are that across product groups mean levels of annual elementary index bias vary between -0.53 and 0.55 percentage points depending on the index.

12.48 Haan and Heymerik (2009) have identified a problem associated with the use of scanner data, especially when bilateral superlative price indices are used. The high-frequency chaining, used to handle the high attrition rate of items, can create drift in the index series when prices and quantities change or bounce arising from sales. Therefore, new methods have been developed for price measurement based on scanner data. The approach proposed in Ivancic and others (2009) that provides drift-free, superlative-type indices through adapting multilateral index number theory seems to provide a solution to this problem. The methods proposed, however, pose some practical challenges and require some more evidence before becoming widely accepted. For an overview of methods for price measurement using scanner data, see Chessa and others (2017) and Chapter 10 on scanner data.

12.49 The method used by the NSO for sampling items within a category will determine the effectiveness of formula choice in dealing with lower-level substitution bias. For example, if only a single representative item is chosen to represent the category, the index formula will fail to reflect the consumer response to any relative price change in the universe of items. Therefore, a larger sample of representative items should yield a smaller sampling variance for a given elementary index. More generally, the geometric mean formula index suffers from an upward bias in very small samples (fewer than five observations), so lower-level substitution bias may be underestimated in empirical comparisons of the geometric mean to other index formulas. White (1999) discusses the relationship between sampling error and bias estimates. McClelland and Reinsdorf (1999) also study the impact of small sample sizes on the index and conclude that it has the effect of raising the expected values of an index based on nonlinear formulas, especially the geometric mean formulas. More extensive use of scanner data may mitigate the problem of small sample given that sample sizes in a typical scanner data set are large. In some cases, the use of scanner data may remove the need for sampling.

12.50 The impact of formula choice can be estimated with some degree of precision over a given historical period. Any corresponding bias, however, can be estimated only by assuming that the geometric mean or other functional form successfully approximates the index’s measurement objective.

12.51 As implied by the previous discussion, the importance of elementary aggregate bias will vary by country, depending on the particular index formulas used, the degree of heterogeneity within index strata, and the sampling methods employed. Also, as with upper-level substitution bias, elementary aggregate bias will vary with the overall level of inflation in the economy if absolute and relative price changes are correlated.

12.52 The performance of any formula for elementary aggregate calculation will also be affected by the methods used by the NSO to handle special situations, such as seasonal products and other products that are temporarily unavailable. Armknecht and Maitland-Smith (1999) discuss how the failure to impute missing prices can lead to bias in the modified Laspeyres and other index formulas.

Quality Change and New Goods Bias

12.53 Discussion of potential CPI biases arising from inadequate quality adjustment has a long history. For example, the Stigler Committee report on US price statistics (Price Statistics Review Committee, 1961) indicated that if a poll were taken of professional economists and statisticians, in all probability they would designate (and by a wide majority) the failure of the price indices to take full account of quality changes as the most important defect of these indices. In most studies of bias, unmeasured or mismeasured quality change is also the largest contributor to the total estimated bias. Just as quality adjustment is widely recognized as an extremely difficult process, it is correspondingly difficult to measure any quality change bias.

12.54 Unlike substitution bias, which can be estimated by comparison of alternative formulas, quality change bias must be analyzed on a product-by-product basis. Products and their associated index components will experience widely varying rates of quality change over time. Moreover, the methods used for quality adjustment will also vary. Whereas the linking method (link to show no change) may dominate with regard to frequency of use, important index components may employ production cost, hedonic adjustment, or the other methods described in Chapter 6 of this Manual and Chapter 8 of the publication Consumer Price Index Theory.

12.55 A crucial point to recognize is that the direction of overall quality change does not imply the direction of any quality change bias. Nonexperts sometimes assume that little or no quality adjustment is carried out in the CPI, and that it therefore must overestimate price change in view of the many demonstrable improvements over time in the quality of goods and services. Rather, for any component index, the issue is whether the direct or indirect method chosen for quality adjustment overestimates or underestimates the relative quality of replacement items in the CPI sample. The resulting bias can be either positive or negative.

12.56 Empirical evidence on quality change bias has been based largely on extrapolation from individual studies of particular products. These individual studies may involve, for example, comparisons of hedonic regression indices to the corresponding CPI series or estimates of the value of some product improvement that is ignored in CPI calculations. Although the majority of such studies have suggested upward rather than downward bias, the reliance on fragmentary evidence has led to criticism by observers who point to evidence of quality declines that have not been subjected to systematic analysis.

12.57 Overall quality trends can also be a matter of subjective valuation, especially for services. New technology has led to unambiguous improvements in the quality of many consumer durables and other goods. By contrast, in service sectors such as mail delivery, public transport, and medical care, it can be difficult to evaluate changes in quality. Airline travel, for example, has become safer and faster but perhaps less comfortable and reliable in recent decades, and the lack of cross-sectional variation in these characteristics makes the use of hedonic quality adjustment problematic.

12.58 Digitalization of the economy, if not properly captured, could also be a source of bias. Reinsdorf and Schreyer (2017) identify three possible sources of distortion that the digital economy can cause, one of which is incomplete adjustment for quality change, that is, the treatment of new, and typically improved, varieties of existing digital

products; the treatment of new digital products that replace existing nondigital products; and improved variety selection of digital and nondigital products yield overestimation of inflation. By using the weights in an average consumption basket for the Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) member countries from the OECD purchasing power parities program,5 the inflation was overestimated by 0.28 percentage points because of possible underadjustment for quality changes in digital products such as computers, information and communication technology equipment, and telecommunication services.

12.59 New goods bias, like elementary aggregate bias, can be divided conceptually into two components. The first concerns the failure to bring new products into the CPI sample with sufficient speed. This can lead to upward bias if those new products later experience large price reductions that are not reflected in the index. The second component is the welfare gain that consumers experience when a new product appears; however, this may not be viewed as a bias if the CPI measurement objective is a cost of goods index and not a COLI.

12.60 As discussed in Chapter 6, “new goods” can be replacements for disappearing items, for example, cloud storage areas replacing physical storage devices; new varieties of an existing product that widen the range of consumer choice, such as nonalcoholic beers and ethnic restaurants; or products that represent entirely new categories of consumption, such as multitask robots for cooking or smartphones.

12.61 Like quality change bias, new goods bias has sometimes been estimated primarily by generalization from individual product evidence. A frequent approach has been to measure the price change for a product or category during a period prior to its entry into the CPI sample. Studies by Hausman (1997, 1999) on breakfast cereals and mobile phones provided quantitative measures of the consumer surplus gain from the new products, but this complex econometric approach has not been applied widely. Some of the Boskin Commission’s estimates of new product bias, notably those for food, were necessarily based on conjecture.

12.62 Also, like quality change bias, new goods bias could be negative if the range of products decreases, if valuable consumer goods disappear from the market, or if the index fails to capture phases of rapid price increase for items. Most observers, however, seem to agree on the direction of bias as upward, and that the uncertainty concerns the magnitude. The extent of the new goods bias depends on the importance of the new products with regard to the proportion of consumer expenditure spent on new products not yet introduced in the CPI basket, and the extent of the price decline from the initial price.

12.63 One of the risks of downward bias in the CPI is associated with producers that reduce the package size of household goods keeping the price stable (“shrinkfation”) or repacking the old product. This phenomenon is strictly linked with the minor changes in product packaging or product characteristics (so-called product relaunches). These should be properly handled, through the use of a unit value approach, in particular in scanner data, because the product relaunched in most of the cases presents a new Global Trade Item Number but it is directly comparable with the product before the relaunch. When scanner data are used in CPI and large amounts of data are processed on a weekly basis, it is not possible to observe and report all changes incurred in the size or in the characteristics of the product and assess the comparability of the previous and the replacing product. Therefore, automatic procedures have to be carefully implemented to link different Global Trade Item Numbers in contiguous months and correctly estimate the price change, avoiding the risk of bias that usually is downward.

New Outlet Bias

12.64 Conceptually, new outlet bias is identical to new goods bias. It arises because of the failure to reflect either price changes in new outlets not yet sampled, or the welfare gain to consumers when the new outlets appear. The explanation for its existence as a separate bias category is twofold. The first reason is historical: new outlet bias was identified by Reinsdorf (1993) as a potentially major explanation for anomalous movements in the US CPI. Second, the methods used to sample and compare outlets differ from those used with products, and the problems in controlling new outlet bias are somewhat different.

12.65 A failure to maintain a current outlet sample can introduce bias because the new outlets are distinctive in their pricing or service policy. Reinsdorf (1993) and, more recently, Hausman and Leibtag (2004, 2005) focus on the growth of discount stores. It should be noted, however, that the problem could also be geographical in nature; it is important to employ outlet sampling frames that reflect new as well as traditional shopping locations, although the widespread and increasing weight of online outlets have changed the dimension of this issue.

12.66 One way that new products enter the CPI sample is through forced replacement, when exiting or less successful products disappear from shelves. Outlet disappearance is less frequent, and NSO procedures may not provide for automatic replacement. Moreover, when a new outlet enters the sample there are no standard procedures for comparing data at the new and old outlets. Thus, the index will not incorporate any effects of, for example, lower price or inferior service quality at the new outlet.

12.67 Reinsdorf (1993) estimated the degree of new outlet bias by comparing average prices at outlets entering and disappearing from US CPI samples. There has been little or no empirical work, however, on the measurement or consumer valuation of outlet quality such as product variety, location, car parking, and customer services. As a consequence, there is little evidence on how to evaluate the accuracy of new outlet bias estimates.

12.68 Greenlees and McClelland (2012) confirm the potential importance of new outlets bias in the CPI. This study provides new and detailed evidence on the impact of the appearance and growth of new types of outlets on the CPI. Using price data collected by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics for 2002–2007, the authors observed a continuous increase in the market share of discount department stores and warehouse club stores, and significantly lower prices in these stores than at large grocery stores. The increasing shares of lower-priced store categories reduced the average prices collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Changes in the distribution of outlets within categories also led to a substantial decline in average prices. Hausman (2004) also documents the growing role of discount outlets and provides a specific example of outlet bias.

12.69 Like with new goods bias, most studies seem to agree on the direction of bias as upward. The extent of the new outlet bias depends on (1) the components of the CPI basket that are likely to be affected, (2) the change in market share of new outlets for these items, and (3) the percentage difference in quality-adjusted prices between new outlets and old outlets. Estimates of the size of outlet substitution bias must take into account the fact that the market price of an item depends on both the quality of the item and the quality of the outlet where it is purchased, based on such factors as the level of service and the convenience of the location.

Summary of Bias Estimates

12.70 The 1996 Boskin Commission report gave a range of estimates for the total upward US CPI bias of 0.8–1.6 percentage points, with the point estimate being 1.1 percentage points. This total reflects the straightforward summation of the component bias estimates. As reported in US General Accounting Office (2000), however, changes in CPI methods subsequent to 1996 led the Boskin Commission members to reduce their estimates of total bias. Lacking evidence to the contrary, additivity of biases has been assumed in most such studies. Shapiro and Wilcox (1997b) provide probability distributions and correlations of their component bias estimates, yielding an overall confidence interval for the total bias. Most detailed studies of bias also conclude that the CPI bias is in an upward direction, although there have been numerous criticisms of that conclusion. For example, Brown and Stockburger (2006) estimated that the hedonic quality-adjustment methods in apparel have had both upward and downward impacts at different points in time and for different categories of clothing in the United States.

12.71 In general, NSOs cannot compute or publish CPI bias estimates on a regular basis. Many of the same obstacles that prevent the elimination of bias also stand in the way of estimating bias. These include the lack of complete data on product-level consumer preferences and expenditure behavior, and the inability to observe and value all differences in quality among items in the market. Without such information, it is impossible to calculate a true COLI, and similarly impossible to measure the divergence between its rate of growth and the growth rate of the CPI.

12.72 NSOs have been reluctant to provide their own estimates of CPI bias. In some cases, they have accepted the existence of substitution bias, recognizing that the use of a Laspeyres formula implies that the CPI usually will overstate price change relative to a COLI estimated by a superlative index such as the Fisher. NSOs have, however, been reluctant to draw even qualitative conclusions from the fragmentary and speculative evidence on quality change, new goods, and new outlet bias.

12.73 The CPI bias may appear to a different extent in different countries. Hanousek and Filer (2001) show that bias was especially high in countries in transition and during the period of high inflation. They argue that the substitution bias increases with the increase of the variance of relative price changes. They argue that bias arising from substitution increases in line with the level of inflation, because, as the rate of inflation increases, so does the variance of relative price changes.

Procedures to Minimize Bias

12.74 Although it is almost impossible to eliminate sources of bias, measures can be taken to minimize them. These include:

  • i. Use appropriate formulas in compiling elementary aggregate indices, in particular use of the geometric mean (Jevons) formula where appropriate or the ratio of arithmetic prices (Dutot) formula.

  • ii. Review and update weights and CPI baskets frequently, but at least once every five years. Given that a significant part of the total measurement bias in the CPI may be caused by the fixed nature of the CPI basket, the item-substitution bias and some of the new products bias could be reduced by increasing the frequency at which weights are updated. For some categories, it may be necessary to update the weights more frequently as such weights are likely to become out of date more quickly than higher-level weights. In periods of high inflation, the weights should be updated even more frequently. Scanner data may help in this, at least for some areas such as food.

  • iii. Use a superlative index formula rather than the Laspeyres, if current period weighting data can be obtained on time. Where Lowe or Young indices are used, the upper-level substitution bias can be reduced by more frequent updating of expenditure weights, implementing them with minimal time lag. Other options might be to use formulas that allow substitution or assumptions about substitution between elementary aggregates to be entered.

  • iv. Closely monitor and update outlet samples to reflect changes in the outlets from which households purchase. For example, there is clearly a need to plan for the inclusion in CPIs of purchases from outlets operating exclusively online, but also from discount outlets, factory outlets, or others whose importance has been increasing.

  • v. Include new goods in the CPI as soon as possible. For a fixed-weight index such as Laspeyres, there would also be a need to update the fixed weights to allow for the inclusion of new goods if they are substituting for all goods in general, or to adjust the weights within an item group if the new goods are substituting for specific items. For example, one could argue that MP3 players were a new good, but as they were substituting for portable cassette and CD players, they could be introduced into the item grouping for portable cassette and CD players, and weights between these items adjusted accordingly.

  • vi. Ensure that the most appropriate quality-adjustment methods are applied.

  • vii. Make greater use of the scanner data to deal with quality change, substitution, and new products. Scanner data contain detailed and timely information on the prices and quantities of all consumer transactions. The role for scanner data cannot be understated, given its ability to track market trends and detect the emergence of new products on the market, helping to reduce the lag in introducing new goods into the CPI basket. The use of scanner data also makes it possible to compile superlative price indices at detailed aggregation levels since prices and quantities are available.

Key Recommendations

  • In order to ensure public confidence in a CPI, a detailed and up-to-date description of the methods and data sources should be published. The document should include, among other things, the objectives and scope of the index, details of the weights, and a discussion of the accuracy of the index.

  • A description of the sources and magnitude of the sampling and nonsampling errors (for example, coverage or nonresponse rates) in a CPI should be published to provide users with valuable information on the limitations that might apply to their uses of the index.6

  • Resources should be allocated to those areas where the effect on the quality of the all-items CPI is maximized, especially to goods and services with a high relative expenditure weight and to those with high dispersion of prices.

  • To reduce the index’s potential for giving a misleading picture, it is in general essential:

  • To update weights and baskets regularly

  • To employ unbiased elementary aggregate formulae

  • To make appropriate adjustments for quality change

  • To allow adequately and correctly for new products

  • To take proper account of substitution issues

  • To undertake quality control of the entire compilation process

12.75 Improving precision and accuracy of the CPI will take both time and resources. Resources should be allocated to those areas where the effect on the quality of the all-items CPI is maximized, especially to goods and services with a high relative expenditure weight and to those with high dispersion of prices. Further uses of scanner data can help NSOs deal with the quality changes, outlet substitution, and new goods bias problems. An investigation into factors affecting consumer choice and an expanded HBS would help identify consumer preferences for different outlet types and to improve accurate price measurement in areas where quality change is rapid. Opportunities presented by technology, such as the use of computer-assisted techniques, scanning, and web scraping techniques, can minimize processing errors.

1

See also Balk and Kersten (1986) and Dalén (1995) for overviews of the various sources of stochastic and nonstochastic errors experienced in calculating a CPI.

3

D. G. Horvitz, and D. J. Thompson. 1952. “A Generalization of Sampling without Replacement from a Finite Universe.” Journal of the American Statistical Association 47: 663–85. JSTOR 2280784

6

Examples of handbooks of CPI methods are those published by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (2015) and Australian Bureau of Statistics (2018, Chapter 11), which devote a section to the varieties and sources of possible error in the index.

Author: Brian Graf
  • Abe, N., and K. Shinozaki. 2018. “Compilation of Experimental Price Indexes Using Big Data and Machine Learning: A Comparative Analysis and Validity Verification.” Paper presented at the UNECE/ILO Meeting of the Group of Experts on Consumer Price Indices, Geneva, May 7–9. https://www.unece.org.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Abraham, K. G., J. S. Greenlees, and B. R. Moulton. 1998. “Working to Improve the Consumer Price Index.” Journal of Economic Perspectives 12 (1): 2736.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Aczél, J. 1987. A Short Course on Functional Equations. Dordrecht: Reidel Publishing Co.

  • Advisory Commission to Study the Consumer Price Index. 1995. Toward a More Accurate Measure of the Cost of Living. Interim Report to the Senate Finance Committee, September 15. Washington, DC.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Aizcorbe, A. M., and P. C. Jackman. 1993. “The Commodity Substitution Effect in CPI Data, 1982–91.” Monthly Labor Review 116 (12): 2533.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Aizcorbe, A., C. Corrado, and M. Doms. 2001. Constructing Price and Quantity Indexes for High Technology Goods. Industrial Output Section, Division of Research and Statistics. Washington, DC: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Aizcorbe, A., C. Corrado, and M. Doms. 2003. “When Do Matched-Model and Hedonic Techniques Yield Similar Price Measures?Working Paper 2003–14, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Alterman, W. F., W. E. Diewert, and R. C. Feenstra. 1999. International Trade Price Indexes and Seasonal Commodities. Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Anderson, R. G., B. E. Jones, and T. Nesmith. 1997. “Building New Monetary Services Indexes: Concepts, Data and Methods.” Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis Review 79 (1): 5383.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Arguea, N. M., C. Haseo, and G. A. Taylor. 1994. “Estimating Consumer Preferences Using Market Data: An Application to U.S. Automobile Demand.” Journal of Applied Econometrics 9: 118.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Armknecht, P. A. 1996. “Improving the Efficiency of the U.S. CPI.” Working Paper No. 96/103, International Monetary Fund, Washington, DC.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Armknecht, P. A. 2016. “Fixed Basket Methods for Compiling Consumer Price Indexes.” Meeting of the Group of Experts on Consumer Price Indices, Geneva, Switzerland, May 2–4, 2016. http://www.unece.org/index.php.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Armknecht, P. A., and D. Weyback. 1989. “Adjustments for Quality Change in the U.S. Consumer Price Index.” Journal of Official Statistics 5 (2): 10723.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Armknecht, P. A., and F. Maitland-Smith. 1999. “Price Imputation and Other Techniques for Dealing with Missing Observations, Seasonality and Quality Change in Price Indices.” Working Paper No. 99/78, International Monetary Fund, Washington, DC. http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/wp/1999/wp9978.pdf

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Armknecht, P. A., and M. Silver. 2014. “Post-Laspeyres: The Case for a New Formula for Compiling Consumer Price Indexes.” The Review of Income and Wealth 60 (2): 22544.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Armknecht, P. A., W. F. Lane, and K. J. Stewart. (1997) 2003. “New Products and the U.S. Consumer Price Index.” In Scanner Data and Price Indexes, NBER Studies in Income and Wealth, edited by R. C. Feenstra and M. D. Shapiro. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, pp. 37591.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Arrow, K. J., H. B. Chenery, B. S. Minhas, and R. M. Solow. 1961. “Capital–Labor Substitution and Economic Efficiency.” Review of Economics and Statistics 63: 22550.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Astin, J. 1999. “The European Union Harmonized Indices of Consumer Prices (HICP).” in Proceedings of the Ottawa Group Fifth Meeting, Reykjavik, Iceland, August 25–27, edited by R. Gudnason and T. Gylfadottir. Reykjavík: Statistics Iceland; also published in Statistical Journal of the United Nations ECE16: 12335. http://www.statcan.ca/secure/english/ottawagroup/.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Astin, J. 2001. “New Uses of PPPs within the European Union.” Paper presented at the Joint World Bank–OECD Seminar on Purchasing Power Parities: Recent Advances in Methods and Applications, Washington, DC, January 30–February 2.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Aten, B., R. Summers, and A. Heston. 2001. “An Explanation of Stability in Country Price Structures: Implications for Spatial– Temporal Comparisons.” Paper presented at the Joint World Bank–OECD Seminar on Purchasing Power Parities: Recent Advances in Methods and Applications, Washington, DC, January 30–February 2.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics. 1997. “An Analytical Framework for Price Indexes in Australia.” Information Paper, Catalogue No. 6421.0. http://www.abs.gov.au.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics. 2003. “Australian Consumer Price Index: Concepts, Sources and Methods.” Catalogue No. 6461.0. http://www.abs.gov.au/.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics. 2009. “Consumer Price Index: Concepts, Sources and Methods.” Catalogue No. 6461.0, ABS, Canberra. http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/6461.0.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics. 2013. “Feature Article: The Use of Transactions Data to Compile the Australian Consumer Price Index.” Catalogue No. 6401.0, ABS, Canberra. http://www.abs.gov.au/.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics. 2015. “Enhancing the Australian CPI: A Roadmap.” Catalogue No. 6401.0.60.001, ABS, Canberra. http://www.abs.gov.au/.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics. 2016a. “Making Greater Use of Transactions Data to Compile the Consumer Price Index.” Information Paper 6401.0.60.003, ABS, Canberra. http://www.abs.gov.au/.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics. 2016b. “Measuring Price Change of Attached Dwellings in the CPI.” Feature Article, ABS, Canberra. http://www.abs.gov.au/.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics. 2017a. “An Implementation Plan to Maximise the Use of Transactions Data in the CPI.” Information Paper 6401.0.60.004, ABS, Canberra. http://www.abs.gov.au/.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics. 2017b. “Introduction of the 17th Series Australian Consumer Price Index.” Information Paper 6470.0.55.001, ABS, Canberra. http://www.abs.gov.au/AUS-STATS/abs@.nsf/DetailsPage/6470.0.55.0012017.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bäckström, Peter, and Muhanad Sammar. 2012. “The Use of Superlative Index Links in the Swedish CPI.” Paper presented at the meeting of the Group of Experts on CPI, Geneva. https://www.unece.org/index.php.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bailey, M. J., R. F. Muth, and H. O. Nourse. 1963. “A Regression Method for Real Estate Price Construction.” Journal of the American Statistical Association 58: 93342.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Baker, D. 1998. “Does the CPI Overstate Inflation? An Analysis of the Boskin Commission Report.” In Getting Prices Right, edited by D. Baker. Washington, DC: Economic Policy Institute, pp. 79155.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Baldwin, A. 1990. “Seasonal Baskets in Consumer Price Indexes.” Journal of Official Statistics 6 (3): 25173.

  • Baldwin, A., A. Nakamura, and M. Prudhomme. 2010. “An Empirical Analysis of the Different Concepts for Owned Accommodation in the Canadian CPI: The Case of Ottawa, 1996–2005.” Paper presented at the UNECE/ILO Meeting of the Group of Experts on Consumer Price Indices, Geneva, May 10–12. https://www.unece.org.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Balk, B. M. 1980a. “Seasonal Products in Agriculture and Horticulture and Methods for Computing Price Indices.” Statistical Studies No. 24. The Hague: Netherlands Central Bureau of Statistics.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Balk, B. M. 1980b. “Seasonal Commodities and the Construction of Annual and Monthly Price Indexes.” Statistische Hefte 21: 1106.

  • Balk, B. M. 1980c. “A Method for Constructing Price Indices for Seasonal Commodities.” The Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A 143: 6875.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Balk, B. M. 1981. “A Simple Method for Constructing Price Indices for Seasonal Commodities.” Statistische Hefte 22: 728.

  • Balk, B. M. 1983. “Does There Exist a Relation between Inflation and Relative Price Change Variability? The Effect of the Aggregation Level.” Economic Letters 13: 173180.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Balk, B. M. 1985. “A Simple Characterization of Fisher’s Price Index.” Statistische Hefte 26: 5963.

  • Balk, B. M. 1989a. “Changing Consumer Preferences and the Cost of Living Index: Theory and Nonparametric Expressions.” Zeitschrift für Nationalökonomie 50 (2): 15769.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Balk, B. M. 1989b. “On Calculating the Precision of Consumer Price Indices.” Contributed Papers 47th Session of the ISI. Paris: International Statistical Institute.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Balk, B. M. 1990. “On Calculating Cost-of-Living Index Numbers for Arbitrary Income Levels.” Econometrica 58 (1): 7592.

  • Balk, B. M. 1994. “On the First Step in the Calculation of a Consumer Price Index.” Paper presented at First Meeting of the International Working Group on Price Indices, Ottawa, October 31–November 4. http://www.ottawagroup.org.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Balk, B. M. 1995. “Axiomatic Price Index Theory: A Survey.” International Statistical Review 63: 6993.

  • Balk, B. M. 1996a. “A Comparison of Then Methods for Multilateral International Price and Volume Comparisons.” Journal of Official Statistics 12: 199222.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Balk, B. M. 1996b. “Consistency in Aggregation and Stuvel Indices.” The Review of Income and Wealth 42: 35363.

  • Balk, B. M. 1998a. Industrial Price, Quantity and Productivity Indices. Boston, MA: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  • Balk, B. M. 1998b. “On the Use of Unit Value Indices as Consumer Price Subindices.” Paper presented at the Fourth Meeting of the International Working Group on Price Indices, Washington, DC, April 22–24. http://www.ottawagroup.org.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Balk, B. M. 2000a. “Divisia Price and Quantity Indexes 75 Years After.” Draft Paper, Department of Statistical Methods, Statistics Netherlands, Voorburg.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Balk, B. M. 2000b. “On Curing the CPI’s Substitution and New Goods Bias.” Research Paper 0005, Department of Statistical Methods, Statistics Netherlands, Voorburg.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Balk, B. M. 2001. Aggregation Methods in International Comparisons: What Have We Learned? Report Series Research in Management ERS-2001–41-MKT, Erasmus Research Institute of Management. Rotterdam: Erasmus University.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Balk, B. M. 2005. “Price Indexes for Elementary Aggregates: The Sampling Approach.” Journal of Official Statistics 21: 67599.

  • Balk, B. M. 2008. Price and Quantity Index Numbers. Cambridge: University Press.

  • Balk, B. M. 2008. Price and Quantity Index Numbers: Models for Measuring Aggregate Change and Difference. New York: Cambridge University Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Balk, B. M. 2010. “Lowe and Cobb-Douglas Consumer Price Indexes and Their Substitution Bias.” Jahrbücher für Nation-alökonomie und Statistik (The Journal of Economics and Statistics) 230 (6): 72640.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Balk, B. M., and H. M. P. Kersten. 1986. “On the Precision of Consumer Price Indices Caused by the Sampling Variability of Budget Surveys.” Journal of Economic and Social Measurement 14: 1935.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Balk, B. M., and W. E. Diewert. 2001. “A Characterization of the Törnqvist Price Index.” Economics Letters 73: 27981.

  • Ball, A., and D. Fenwick. 2004. “Costing Mobile Telephone Calls: The Use of Constrained User Profiles.” Paper presented at the Eighth Meeting of the International Working Group on Price Indices, Helsinki, August 23–25. http://www.ottawagroup.org.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bartik, T. J. 1988. “Measuring the Benefits of Land Improvements in Hedonic Models.” Land Economics 64 (2): 17283.

  • Bas, C. 2018. “Different Approaches and Methods for Strong Seasonal Items in the CPI.” Paper presented at the UNECE/ILO Meeting of the Group of Experts on Consumer Price Indices, Geneva, May 7–9. https://www.unece.org.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bascher, J., and T. Lacroix. 1999. “Dishwashers and PCs in the French CPI: Hedonic Modeling, from Design to Practice.” Paper presented at the Fifth Meeting of the International Working Group on Price Indices, Reykjavik, August 25–27. http://www.ottawagroup.org.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Baxter, M. (ed.). 1998. The Retail Prices Index. Technical Manual. London: Office for National Statistics, UK.

  • Bean, L. H., and O. C. Stine. 1924. “Four Types of Index Numbers of Farm Prices.” Journal of the American Statistical Association 19: 305.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Becker, G. S. 1965. “A Theory of the Allocation of Time.” Economic Journal 75: 493517.

  • Beck-MacNeil, R. 2018. “Pricing the Internet—The Internet Access Services Component of the Canadian CPI.” Statistics Canada. Paper presented at the UNECE/ILO Meeting of the Group of Experts on Consumer Price Indices, Geneva, May 7–9. https://www.unece.org.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Beidelman, C. 1973. Valuation of Used Capital Assets. Sarasota, FL: American Accounting Association.

  • Beidelman, C. 1976. “Economic Depreciation in a Capital Goods Industry.” National Tax Journal 29: 37990.

  • Beisteiner, A. 2008. “Optimal Allocation of Prices in Practice— Using the Neumann Formula as Tool.” Paper presented at the UNECE/ILO Meeting of the Group of Experts on Consumer Price Indices, Geneva, May 8–9. https://www.unece.org.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bentley, A., and F. Krsinich. 2017. “Towards a Big Data CPI for New Zealand.” Paper presented at the Fifteen Meeting of the International Working Group on Price Indices, Eltville am Rhein, May 10–12. http://www.ottawagroup.org.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bernardini, A., C. De Vitiis, A. Guandalini, F. Inglese, and M. D. Terribili. 2016. “Measuring Inflation Through Different Sampling Designs Implemented on Scanner Data.” Paper presented at Meeting of the Group of Experts on Consumer Price Indices, Geneva, Switzerland, May 2–4.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Berndt, E. R. 1991. The Practice of Econometrics: Classic and Contemporary. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.

  • Berndt, E. R., D. Ling, and M. K. Kyle. 2003. “The Long Shadow of Patent Expiration: Generic Entry and Rx to OTC Switches.” In Scanner Data and Price Indexes, NBER Studies in Income and Wealth, edited by M. Shapiro and R. C. Feenstra. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, pp. 22973.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Berndt, E. R., L. T. Bui, D. H. Lucking-Reiley, and G. L. Urban. 1997. “The Roles of Marketing, Product Quality and Price Competition in the Growth and Composition of the U.S. Anti-Ulcer Drug Industry.” In The Economics of New Goods, NBER Studies in Income and Wealth, edited by T. Bresnahan and R. J. Gordon. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, pp. 23277.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Berndt, E. R., Z. Griliches, and N. J. Rappaport. 1995. “Econometric Estimates of Price Indexes for Personal Computers in the 1990s.” Journal of Econometrics 68: 24368.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Berry, S., J. Levinsohn, and A. Pakes. 1995. “Automobile Prices in Market Equilibrium.” Econometrica 63 (4): 841–90; also published as NBER Working Paper No. W4264, July 1996. http://www.nber.org.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Beuerlein, I. 2001. “The German Consumer Price Index for Telecommunication Services: A User Profile Approach for Mobile Technology and Internet Access.” Paper presented at the Sixth Meeting of the International Working Group on Price Indices, Canberra, April 2–6. http://www.ottawagroup.org/.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bhardwaj, H., T. Flower, P. Lee, and M. Mayhew. 2017. Research Indices Using Web Scraped Price Data. August 2017 Update, UK Office for National Statistics, London.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bird, D., R. Breton, C. Payne, and A. Restieaux. 2014. Initial Report on Experiences with Scanner Data in ONS. Report, Office for National Statistics, Newport, UK.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bode, B., and van J. Dalén. 2001. “Quality-Corrected Price Indexes of New Passenger Cars in the Netherlands, 1990–1999.” Paper presented at the Sixth Meeting of the International Working Group on Price Indices, Canberra, April 2–6. http://www.ottawagroup.org.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Boettcher, I. 2015. “Automatic Data Collection on the Internet (Web Scraping).” Statistic Austria. Paper presented at the Fourteen Meeting of the International Working Group on Price Indices, Tokyo, May 20–22. http://www.ottawagroup.org.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Böhm-Bawerk, E. V. 1891. The Positive Theory of Capital. Translated from the original German edition of 1888 by W. Smart. New York: G. E. Stechert.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bortkiewicz, L. V. 1923. “Zweck und Struktur einer Preisin-dexzahl.” Nordisk Statistisk Tidsskrift 2: 369408.

  • Boskin, M. J. (Chair), E. R. Dullberger, R. J. Gordon, Z. Griliches, and D. W. Jorgenson. 1996. Final Report of the Commission to Study the Consumer Price Index, U.S. Senate, Committee on Finance. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Boskin, M. J. (Chair), E. R. Dullberger, R. J. Gordon, Z. Griliches, and D. W. Jorgenson. 1998. “Consumer Prices in the Consumer Price Index and the Cost of Living.” Journal of Economic Perspectives 12 (1): 326.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Böttcher, I., and S. Sergeev. 2014. “Austrian Scanner Data Project—Report Multipurpose Consumer Price Statistics: The Use of Scanner Data.” Paper presented at the UNECE/ILO Meeting of the Group of Experts on Consumer Price Indices, Geneva, May 26–8. https://www.unece.org.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bowley, A. L. 1899. “Wages, Nominal and Real.” In Dictionary of Political Economy, Volume 3, edited by R. H. I. Palgrave. London: Macmillan, pp. 64051.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bowley, A. L. 1901. Elements of Statistics. Westminster: Orchard House.

  • Bowley, A. L. 1919. “The Measurement of Changes in the Cost of Living.” Journal of the Royal Statistical Society 82: 34361.

  • Bradley, R. 1995. “The Use of Scanner Data as a Means to Reduce the Mean Squared Error in the CPI.” Working paper, U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, DC.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bradley, R. 2007. “Analytical Bias Reduction for Small Samples in the U.S. Consumer Price Index.” Journal of Business & Economic Statistics 25: 33746.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bradley, R., B. Cook, S. E. Leaver, and B. R. Moulton. 1997. “An Overview of Research on Potential Uses of Scanner Data in the U.S. CPI.” Paper presented at the Third Meeting of the International Working Group on Price Indices, Voorburg, April 16–18. http://www.ottawagroup.org.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Braithwait, S. D. 1980. “The Substitution Bias of the Laspeyres Price Index: An Analysis Using Estimated Cost-of-Living Indexes.” American Economic Review 70 (1): 6477.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Brand, M., C. Vermeulen, D. Fischbach, and Y. Carpy. 2017. “Swiss Residential Property Price Index: The Use of Geolocal-ised Information for Quality Adjustment in Location.” Paper presented at the Fifteenth Meeting of the International Working Group on Price Indices, Eltville, May 10–12. http://www.ottawagroup.org.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bresnahan, T. F. 1997. “Comment.” In The Economics of New Goods, NBER Studies in Income and Wealth, edited by T. F. Bresnahan and R. J. Gordon. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, pp. 23747.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Breton, R., G. Clews, L. Metcalfe, N. Milliken, C. Payne, J. Winton, and A. Woods. 2016. “Research Indices Using Web Scraped Data.” Paper presented at the UNECE/ILO Meeting of the Group of Experts on Consumer Price Indices, Geneva, May 2–4. https://www.unece.org.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Brown, C., and A. Stockburger. 2006. “Item Replacement and Quality Change in Apparel Price Indexes.” Monthly Labor Review (December): 3545. https://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2006/12/art3full.pdf.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Burnett-Isaacs, K. 2015. “Using Hedonics to Create Land and Structure Indexes for the Ottawa Condominium Market.” Paper presented at the Fourteen Meeting of the International Working Group on Price Indices, Tokyo, May 20–22. http://www.ottawagroup.org.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cage, R., J. S. Greenlees, and P. Jackman. 2003. “Introducing the Chained Consumer Price Index.” In International Working Group on Price Indices (Ottawa Group): Proceedings of the Seventh Meeting, edited by Thierry Lacroix. Paris: INSEE, pp. 21346.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Canning, J. B. 1929. The Economics of Accountancy. New York: The Ronald Press Co.

  • Carli, G.-R. 1804. “Del valore e della proporzione dei metallic monetati.” In Scrittori classici italiani di economia politica, Vol. 13. Milano: G. G. Destefanis, pp. 297366; originally published in 1764.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Carruthers, A. G., D. J. Sellwood, and P. W. Ward. 1980. “Recent Developments in the Retail Prices Index.” The Statistician 29: 132.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cassel, E., and R. Mendelsohn. 1985. “On the Choice of Functional Forms for Hedonic Price Equations: Comment.” Journal of Urban Economics 18 (September): 13542.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Castles, I. 1997. The OECD–EUROSTAT PPP Program: Review of Practice and Procedures. Paris: OECD.

  • Cavallo, A. 2016. “Are Online and Offine Prices Similar? Evidence from Large Multi-Channel Retailers.” Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Paper presented at the UNECE/ILO Meeting of the Group of Experts on Consumer Price Indices, Geneva, May 2–4. https://www.unece.org.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cavallo, A., and R. Rigobon. 2016. “The Billion Dollar Project. Using Online Data for Measurement and Research.” MIT & NBER. Paper presented at the UNECE/ILO Meeting of the Group of Experts on Consumer Price Indices, Geneva, May 2–4. https://www.unece.org.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cavallo, A., and R. Rigobon. 2016. “The Billion Prices Project: Using Online Prices for Measurement and Research.” Journal of Economic Perspectives 30 (2): 15178.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Caves, D. W., L. R. Christensen, and W. E. Diewert. 1982a. “The Economic Theory of Index Numbers and the Measurement of Input, Output and Productivity.” Econometrica 50: 1393414.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Caves, D. W., L. R. Christensen, and W. E. Diewert. 1982b. “Multilateral Comparisons of Output, Input and Productivity Using Superlative Index Numbers.” Economic Journal 92: 7386.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cecchetti, S. G. 1997. “Measuring Inflation for Central Bankers.” Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis Review 79: 14355.

  • Chessa, A. G. 2017. “Comparisons of QU-GK Indices for Different Lengths of the Time Window and Updating Methods.” Paper prepared for the Second Meeting on Multilateral Methods Organised by Eurostat, Luxembourg, March 14–15, Statistics Netherlands.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Chessa, A. G. 2020. “A Comparison of Multilateral Index Extension Methods on Transaction Data of Seasonal Items.” Paper presented at the meeting of the Ottawa Group, Rio de Janeiro, May 8–10, 2019.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Chessa, A. G., and R. Griffoen. 2016. “A New Methodology for Processing Scanner Data in the Dutch CPI.” Eurona 1: 4969.

  • Chessa, A. G., J. Verburg, and L. Willenborg. 2017. “A Comparison of Price Index Methods for Scanner Data.” Paper presented at the Fifteen Meeting of the International Working Group on Price Indices, Eltville am Rhein, May 10–12. http://www.ottawagroup.org.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Christensen, L. R., and D. W. Jorgenson. 1969. “The Measurement of U.S. Real Capital Input, 1929–1967.” Review of Income and Wealth 15 (4): 293320.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Christensen, L. R., D. W. Jorgenson, and L. J. Lau. 1971. “Conjugate Duality and the Transcendental Logarithmic Production Function.” Econometrica 39: 25556.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Church, A. H. 1901. “The Proper Distribution of Establishment Charges, Part III.” The Engineering Magazine 21: 90412.

  • Clements, K. W., and H. Y. Izan. 1981. “A Note on Estimating Divisia Index Numbers.” International Economic Review 22: 74547.

  • Clements, K. W., and H. Y. Izan. 1987. “The Measurement of Inflation: A Stochastic Approach.” Journal of Business and Economic Statistics 5: 33950.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cobb, C., and P. H. Douglas. 1928. “A Theory of Production.” American Economic Review 18: 39165.

  • Cochran, W. G. 1977. Sampling Techniques, 3rd edition. New York: Wiley.

  • Cockburn, I. M., and A. H. Anis. 1998. “Hedonic Analysis and Arthritic Drugs.” Working Paper 6574, National Bureau of Economic Research, Cambridge, MA.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Coggeshall, F. 1887. “The Arithmetic, Geometric and Harmonic Means.” Quarterly Journal of Economics 1: 836.

  • Combris, P., S. Lecocqs, and M. Visser. 1997. “Estimation of a Hedonic Price Equation for Bordeaux Wine: Does Quality Matter?Economic Journal 107 (441): 390402.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Commission of the European Communities (Eurostat), International Monetary Fund, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, United Nations, and World Bank. 1993. System of National Accounts 1993. Brussels/Luxembourg, New York, Paris, Washington, DC: United Nations.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Congressional Budget Office (CBO). 1994. “Is the Growth of the CPI a Biased Measure of Changes in the Cost of Living?CBO Paper, October, Washington, DC.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Crawford, A. 1998. “Measurement Biases in the Canadian CPI: An Update.” Bank of Canada Review (Spring): 3956.

  • Cropper, M. L., L. L. Deck, and K. E. McConnell. 1988. “On the Choice of Functional Form for Hedonic Price Functions.” Review of Economics and Statistics 70 (4): 66875.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Crump, N. 1924. “The Interrelation and Distribution of Prices and Their Incidence upon Price Stabilization.” Journal of the Royal Statistical Society 87: 167206.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cunningham, A. W. F. 1996. “Measurement Bias in Price Indices: An Application to the UK’s RPI, Bank of England.” Working Paper 47, Bank of England, London.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Curry, B., P. Morgan, and M. Silver. 2001. “Hedonic Regressions: Mis-specification and Neural Networks.” Applied Economics 33: 65971.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Czinkota, M. R., and I. Ronkainen. 1997. “International Business and Trade in the Next Decade: Report from a Delphi Study.” Journal of International Business Studies 28 (4): 82744.