Chapter

Middle East, North Africa, Afghanistan, and Pakistan

Author(s):
International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
Published Date:
April 2011
Share
  • ShareShare
Show Summary Details

Sources: IMF Regional Economic Outlook database; and Microsoft Map Land.

Note: The country names and borders on this map do not necessarily reflect the IMF’s official position.

MENAP Highlights

The Middle East and North Africa is going through a period of unprecedented change. Even though it is clear today that the popular uprisings are born of a desire for greater political, social, and economic freedom, their timing came as a surprise to everyone, including the IMF. The roots of these uprisings are political, but economic causes are inextricably entwined.

Until late 2010, the region was on track for a recovery from the global crisis. Growth accelerated to 3.9 percent in 2010 from 2.1 percent in 2009, mainly driven by the region’s oil exporters. Nevertheless, the slow growth equilibrium of the past years did not generate enough jobs for the growing labor force.

The unfolding events make it clear that reforms, and even rapid economic growth as seen periodically in Tunisia and Egypt, cannot be sustained unless they create jobs for the rapidly growing labor force and are accompanied by social policies for the most vulnerable. For growth to be sustainable, it must be inclusive and broadly shared, and not just captured by a privileged few. Endemic corruption in the region is an unacceptable affront to the dignity of its citizens, and the absence of transparent and fair rules of the game will inevitably undermine inclusive growth.

At the same time, a socially inclusive agenda will not survive unless macroeconomic and financial stability prevails. Its absence can test even countries with strong institutions, as the recent global crisis has shown. During the current period of turmoil and uncertainty in the region, it is all the more vital to contain rising fiscal imbalances, growing debt and debt-servicing costs, inflation, and capital flight. These threats to macroeconomic and financial stability—if not arrested quickly—could undermine confidence and derail the pursuit of any new social agenda.

Two developments mark the outlook: the unrest in the region and the surge in global fuel and food prices. As a result, the near-term economic outlook is subject to unusually large uncertainties stemming from the fluid political and security situation in a number of countries.

For most oil exporters, the expected increase in oil prices—from US$79 per barrel to US$107 per barrel—and production volumes will lead to higher growth in 2011 and stronger fiscal and external balances, notwithstanding recent increases in government spending. Average real GDP growth (excluding Libya) is projected to reach 4.9 percent in 2011 compared with 3.5 percent in 2010, while non-oil growth is projected to stay at 3.5 percent in 2011. For the GCC, growth is projected to reach 7.8 percent in 2011 as oil production expands to stabilize global oil supply in the face of supply disruptions elsewhere. GCC non-oil growth is set to accelerate by more than 1 percentage point to 5.3 percent in 2011. The oil exporters’ combined external current account surplus is estimated to increase from US$172 billion to US$378 billion (excluding Libya), and for the GCC from US$136 billion to US$304 billion.

The economic outlook for the oil importers is mixed. For Egypt and Tunisia we project this year’s growth to be 2½–4 percentage points lower than in 2010, reflecting disruptions to economic activity during the protests, a decline in tourism, and lower investment. Political uncertainty is also weighing on Lebanon’s economy, and growth in Pakistan is still held back by the effects of last year’s floods. In most other countries, however, growth has continued to pick up, with Jordan, Mauritania, and Morocco benefiting from high prices for phosphate and iron ore.

Governments across the region are responding to political developments—and higher commodity prices—with expansions of fuel and food subsidies, civil service wage and pension increases, additional cash transfers, tax reductions, and other spending increases. The size of the national fiscal packages in 2011 ranges from less than ½ percent of GDP in some MENA oil importers to about 22 percent of GDP in Saudi Arabia (with the spending spread over several years). While some countries can easily afford this extra spending, others will find it straining public finances and debt levels: support from the international community would help bridge financing needs and contain the buildup of debt.

Headline inflation has accelerated across the region, mainly driven by higher international commodity prices. However, there are indications that food and fuel inflation are spilling over into core inflation. More generally, with food and fuel accounting for about half of MCD countries’ consumer price indices, and commodity price shocks likely to be rather persistent, regional central banks will need to pay greater attention to headline inflation when setting policy rates and the overall stance of monetary policy. Upward pressure on policy rates will also come from a rising global interest rate environment and increasing sovereign risk premiums.

Beyond the immediate challenges, the recent uprisings provide a great opportunity to lay the foundation for a socially inclusive growth agenda for the Middle East. Each country must find its own homegrown path for change that is broadly owned, but all will need to respond to some common goals to realize the region’s longer-term potential: a stable macroeconomic environment to provide confidence and attract investment; enough private-sector jobs to absorb the currently unemployed and a fast-growing labor force; access to economic opportunity for citizens to realize their potential; social protection for the vulnerable; and strong and transparent institutions that ensure accountability and good governance. The aim is not just sustained high growth, but also growth that is more inclusive and results in broadly shared development gains.

At the time of writing this Regional Economic Outlook, there were many uncertainties about the MENA region’s future. Nonetheless, the region has many strengths on which to build: a dynamic and young population, vast natural resources, a large regional market, an advantageous geographic position, and access to key markets. While the months ahead will be challenging and inevitably marked by setbacks, there is a momentum for change to build upon.

MENAP Region: Selected Economic Indicators, 2000–11(Percent of GDP, unless otherwise indicated)
AverageProj.
2000–072008200920102011
MENAP1
Real GDP (annual growth)5.44.72.13.93.9
Current Account Balance9.513.31.75.911.7
Overall Fiscal Balance3.26.7-3.6-0.22.4
Inflation, p.a. (annual growth)6.214.37.67.510.8
MENAP Oil Exporters1
Real GDP (annual growth)5.64.70.73.54.9
Current Account Balance13.418.84.29.216.9
Overall Fiscal Balance7.312.9-2.73.07.5
Inflation, p.a. (annual growth)6.914.85.86.810.9
Of Which: Gulf Cooperation Council
Real GDP (annual growth)5.67.20.25.07.8
Current Account Balance15.722.57.612.521.7
Overall Fiscal Balance11.924.7-0.87.212.6
Inflation, p.a. (annual growth)2.211.03.03.25.3
MENAP Oil Importers
Real GDP (annual growth)4.84.84.74.72.3
Current Account Balance-0.8-4.6-4.6-3.3-4.1
Overall Fiscal Balance-5.1-5.4-5.2-6.0-6.8
Inflation, p.a. (annual growth)4.713.311.18.810.7
Memorandum
MENA1
Real GDP (annual growth)5.45.11.83.84.1
Current Account Balance10.414.92.46.512.7
Overall Fiscal Balance4.18.6-3.40.63.3
Inflation, p.a. (annual growth)6.214.56.17.010.2
MENA Oil Importers
Real GDP (annual growth)4.76.44.84.51.9
Current Account Balance-1.0-3.1-4.2-3.8-5.2
Overall Fiscal Balance-6.6-4.5-5.4-6.2-7.9
Inflation, p.a. (annual growth)4.213.57.07.68.3
Sources: National authorities; and IMF staff calculations and projections.

2011 data exclude Libya.

MENAP: (1) Oil Exporters: Algeria, Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, the United Arab Emirates, and Yemen; (2) Oil Importers: Afghanistan, Djibouti, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Mauritania, Morocco, Pakistan, Syria, and Tunisia.

MENA: MENAP excluding Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Sources: National authorities; and IMF staff calculations and projections.

2011 data exclude Libya.

MENAP: (1) Oil Exporters: Algeria, Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, the United Arab Emirates, and Yemen; (2) Oil Importers: Afghanistan, Djibouti, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Mauritania, Morocco, Pakistan, Syria, and Tunisia.

MENA: MENAP excluding Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Principaux points

La région du Moyen-Orient et de l’Afrique du Nord (MOAN) traverse une période de transformation sans précédent. Bien qu’il soit clair aujourd’hui que les soulèvements populaires sont nés de l’aspiration à plus de liberté politique, sociale et économique, tout le monde, y compris le FMI, a été pris par surprise. Les raisons profondes de ces soulèvements sont politiques, mais elles sont inextricablement liées à des causes économiques.

Jusqu’aux derniers mois de 2010, la région était en bonne voie pour se relever de la crise mondiale. La croissance, principalement tirée par les pays exportateurs de pétrole de la région, est passé d’un taux de 2,1 pour cent en 2009 à 3,9 pour cent en 2010. Néanmoins, la croissance tendancielle lente des années précédentes n’a pas créé suffisamment d’emplois pour la population active grandissante.

Les événements actuels montrent clairement que les réformes, voire les périodes de croissance rapide observées en Tunisie et en Égypte, ne peuvent être durables à moins qu’elles ne créent des emplois pour une population active qui augmente à vive allure et ne s’accompagnent de mesures sociales pour les couches les plus vulnérables. Pour que la croissance soit durable, il faut qu’elle soit inclusive et largement partagée, et non accaparée par quelques privilégiés. La corruption endémique dans la région constitue un affront inacceptable à la dignité de ses citoyens, et l’absence de règles du jeu transparentes et équitables mine inévitablement la croissance inclusive.

Cependant, un programme social et inclusif ne peut survivre sans que la stabilité macroéconomique et financière ne soit au rendez-vous. Si elle fait défaut, même les pays dotés de solides institutions peuvent être mis à rude épreuve, comme l’a montré la récente crise mondiale. En ces temps de turbulences et d’incertitudes dans la région, il n’est que plus crucial de contenir la vague montante des déséquilibres budgétaires, de la dette et du service y afférent, de l’inflation et de la fuite de capitaux. Ces menaces qui pèsent sur la stabilité macroéconomique et financière pourraient—si elles ne sont pas stoppées rapidement—saper la confiance et faire dérailler les nouvelles réformes sociales.

Les perspectives sont marquées par deux courants d’évolution: l’agitation qui règne dans la région et l’envolée des cours mondiaux des produits pétroliers et des denrées alimentaires. La conjoncture économique à court terme est donc inhabituellement incertaine à cause de la situation politique et sécuritaire très fluide présente dans un certain nombre de pays.

Pour la plupart des pays exportateurs de pétrole, la hausse prévisible des cours pétroliers – de 79 à 107 dollars EU le baril – et des volumes de production se traduira par une accélération de la croissance en 2011 et une amélioration des soldes budgétaires et extérieurs, en dépit de l’augmentation récente des dépenses publiques. Les projections tablent sur un taux de progression moyen du PIB réel (Libye non comprise) à 4,9 pour cent en 2011, contre 3,5 pour cent en 2010, le taux de croissance hors pétrole restant à 3,5 pour cent en 2011. Pour le Conseil de Coopération du Golfe (CCG), la prévision de croissance est de 7,8 pour cent en 2011, du fait que la production de pétrole va être accrue pour stabiliser l’offre perturbée ailleurs par des ruptures d’approvisionnement. Le taux de croissance hors pétrole du le CCG gagnerait 1 pour cent, passant à 5,3 pour cent en 2011. D’après les estimations, l’excédent global des comptes extérieurs courants des pays exportateurs de pétrole passerait de 172 à 378 milliards de dollars EU (Libye non comprise) et celui du CCG de 136 à 304 milliards de dollars EU.

L’évolution économique des pays importateurs de pétrole s’annonce plus nuancée. Pour l’Égypte et la Tunisie, nos projections donnent la croissance en recul de 2½ à 4 points de pourcentage par rapport à 2010, en raison des perturbations de l’activité économique pendant les protestations, de la diminution du tourisme et de la baisse des investissements. L’incertitude politique pèse aussi sur l’économie du Liban et la croissance du Pakistan qui est encore freinée par les effets des inondations de l’an dernier. Dans la plupart des autres pays, toutefois, la croissance continue à progresser, la hausse des cours des phosphates et du minerai de fer jouant au profit de la Jordanie, du Maroc et de la Mauritanie.

Face aux événements politiques—ainsi qu’à la hausse des cours des matières de base—les autorités gouvernementales de l’ensemble de la région ont réagi en accroissant les subventions des produits pétroliers et alimentaires, en relevant les salaires et les retraites des fonctionnaires, en augmentant les transferts en espèces, en réduisant les impôts et en accroissant les dépenses publiques dans d’autres domaines. Les plans nationaux de relance budgétaire pour 2011 se situent entre moins de 0,5 pour cent du PIB dans certains pays importateurs de pétrole du Moyen-Orient et d’Afrique du Nord à 22 pour cent du PIB environ en Arabie Saoudite (les dépenses s’étalant sur plusieurs années). Alors que certains pays peuvent facilement se permettre ce surcroît de dépenses, d’autres en ressentiront le poids sur la dette et les finances publiques: le soutien de la communauté internationale aiderait à combler les besoins de financement et à contenir la hausse de l’endettement.

L’inflation globale s’est accélérée dans l’ensemble de la région, principalement sous l’effet de la hausse des cours internationaux des matières de base. Il semble toutefois que la hausse des prix des denrées alimentaires et des produits pétroliers déteigne sur l’inflation de base. Plus généralement, étant donné que les denrées alimentaires et produits pétroliers pèsent pour près de la moitié dans les indices des prix à la consommation des pays du Moyen-Orient et d’Asie centrale, et que le renchérissement des produits de base risque d’être assez persistant, les banques centrales de la région vont devoir prêter davantage d’attention à l’inflation globale lors de la fixation de leurs taux directeurs et de l’orientation générale de la politique monétaire. Les taux directeurs seront aussi poussés à la hausse par le contexte d’augmentation des taux d’intérêt mondiaux et des primes de risque sur les emprunts souverains.

Au-delà des enjeux immédiats, les récents soulèvements offrent une belle occasion de jeter les bases d’un programme de croissance inclusive et respectueux de la solidarité sociale au Moyen-Orient. Chaque pays devra définir sa propre feuille de route en vue d’une transformation largement consensuelle, mais ils devront tous tendre vers des objectifs communs pour réaliser le potentiel à long terme de la région: un climat de stabilité macroéconomique pour inspirer la confiance et attirer les investissements; la création de suffisamment d’emplois dans le secteur privé pour résorber le chômage et absorber la population active en rapide essor; des débouchés économiques pour que l’ensemble des citoyens puissent réaliser leur potentiel; la protection sociale des plus vulnérables; et des institutions solides et transparentes tenues de rendre compte de leurs actions et de garantir une bonne gouvernance. Le but n’est pas seulement une croissance plus vigoureuse, mais aussi une croissance plus inclusive et des gains en matière de développement qui soient largement partagés.

Au moment de la préparation de cette édition du Rapport sur les perspectives économiques régionales, de nombreuses incertitudes pesaient sur l’évolution future de la région MOAN. Elle a cependant de nombreux points forts sur lesquels construire son avenir: une population jeune et dynamique, d’abondantes ressources naturelles, un vaste marché régional, une situation géographique avantageuse et des débouchés sur les principaux marchés mondiaux. Alors que les mois à venir seront difficiles et inévitablement marqués par des revers, il y a une dynamique de changement prometteuse à développer.

Région MOANAP: Principaux indicateurs économiques, 2000–11(En pourcentage du PIB, sauf indication contraire)
MoyenneProj.
2000–072008200920102011
MOANAP1
PIB réel (croissance annuelle)5.44.72.13.93.9
Solde des transactions courantes9.513.31.75.911.7
Solde budgétaire global3.26.7-3.6-0.22.4
Inflation (croissance annuelle)6.214.37.67.510.8
Pays exportateurs de pétrole de la région MOANAP1
PIB réel (croissance annuelle)5.64.70.73.54.9
Solde des transactions courantes13.418.84.29.216.9
Solde budgétaire global7.312.9-2.73.07.5
Inflation (croissance annuelle)6.914.85.86.810.9
Dont: Conseil de Coopération du Golfe
PIB réel (croissance annuelle)5.67.20.25.07.8
Solde des transactions courantes15.722.57.612.521.7
Solde budgétaire global11.924.7-0.87.212.6
Inflation (croissance annuelle)2.211.03.03.25.3
Pays importateurs de pétrole de la région MOANAP
PIB réel (croissance annuelle)4.84.84.74.72.3
Solde des transactions courantes-0.8-4.6-4.6-3.3-4.1
Solde budgétaire global-5.1-5.4-5.2-6.0-6.8
Inflation (croissance annuelle)4.713.311.18.810.7
Pour mémoire
MOAN1
PIB réel (croissance annuelle)5.45.11.83.84.1
Solde des transactions courantes10.414.92.46.512.7
Solde budgétaire global4.18.6-3.40.63.3
Inflation (croissance annuelle)6.214.56.17.010.2
Pays importateurs de pétrole de la region MOAN
PIB réel (croissance annuelle)4.76.44.84.51.9
Solde des transactions courantes-1.0-3.1-4.2-3.8-5.2
Solde budgétaire global-6.6-4.5-5.4-6.2-7.9
Inflation (croissance annuelle)4.213.57.07.68.3
Sources: autorités nationales; et calculs et projections des services du FMI.

Les données de 2011 excluent la Libye.

MOANAP: (1) Exportateurs de pétrole: Algérie, Arabie Saoudite, Bahreïn, Émirats arabes unis, Iran, Iraq, Koweït, Libye, Oman, Qatar, Soudan et Yémen; (2) Importateurs de pétrole:

Afghanistan, Djibouti, Égypte, Jordanie, Liban, Maroc, Mauritanie, Pakistan, Syrie et Tunisie.

MOAN: MOANAP à l’exclusion de l’Afghanistan et du Pakistan.

Sources: autorités nationales; et calculs et projections des services du FMI.

Les données de 2011 excluent la Libye.

MOANAP: (1) Exportateurs de pétrole: Algérie, Arabie Saoudite, Bahreïn, Émirats arabes unis, Iran, Iraq, Koweït, Libye, Oman, Qatar, Soudan et Yémen; (2) Importateurs de pétrole:

Afghanistan, Djibouti, Égypte, Jordanie, Liban, Maroc, Mauritanie, Pakistan, Syrie et Tunisie.

MOAN: MOANAP à l’exclusion de l’Afghanistan et du Pakistan.

Other Resources Citing This Publication