Chapter

Contributors

Author(s):
Ana Corbacho, and Shanaka Peiris
Published Date:
October 2018
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Mia Frances R. Agcaoili is on secondment as economic analyst at the IMF Resident Representative Office in Manila, Philippines, where her primary task is to write the ASEAN-5 financial markets developments section of the ASEAN-5 Economic Monitor and provide research and statistical support to the IMF country team on the Philippines. She has also conducted some econometric work on tax reform and monetary policy. Before being detailed to the IMF Resident Representative Office, she was a bank officer at the Department of Economic Statistics of the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas. She specialized in external debt and balance of payments and spearheaded the central bank’s initiative in refining the central bank’s debt sustainability model. She obtained her undergraduate degree in statistics in 2011 and master’s in technology management in 2015—both from the University of the Philippines.

Julian T. S. Chow is a senior economist in the IMF Monetary and Capital Markets Department. His surveillance work on emerging market banking and the corporate sector has been published in the IMF’s Global Financial Stability Report and Spillover Report as well as in the Financial Stability Board’s Report on Corporate Funding Structures and Incentives. He has also worked extensively in the IMF Financial Sector Assessment Program in various capacities, as deputy mission chief for Azerbaijan, stress tester for Mexico, and financial sector expert for India and Malaysia. He started his career at Bank Negara Malaysia, the central bank, where he was acting manager for foreign exchange in the Investment Operations and Financial Markets Department. He has also worked in the private sector as a senior fixed income fund manager. He holds a chartered financial analyst (CFA) charter and postgraduate degrees in finance and economics from the London School of Economics and the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology.

Ana Corbacho is currently head of the Strategy Unit of the IMF. When this book was under preparation, she was division chief in the IMF Asia and Pacific Department (APD), where she led the country team on Thailand, the APD Fiscal Group, and the APD ASEAN Group. She has also led IMF operations on a range of countries in Latin America and the Caribbean and has overseen various high-profile regional projects. These include APD’s participation in the first joint test run of the IMF and the Chiang Mai Initiative Multilateralization, a financial network report on Central America and Colombia, and work on the IMF’s Regional Economic Outlook for the Western Hemisphere during the global financial crisis. Between 2010 and 2013, she was the principal economic advisor for the Institutions for Development Sector at the Inter-American Development Bank, responsible for research and dissemination. Her areas of expertise include macroeconomic analysis, fiscal policy, public-private partnerships, financial networks, household survey analysis, and crime and violence. She received her PhD in economics from Columbia University and her Licentiate in economics from Universidad de San Andrés.

Geraldine Dany-Knedlik since 2018 has held a postdoctoral position at DIW Berlin conducting research on empirical monetary economics and macroeconomics in the Macroeconomics Department. She also participates in the joint economic forecast, commissioned by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy, and is instrumental in evaluation of the overall economic situation and development in Germany, the euro area, and the rest of the world. Before joining DIW Berlin she was a PhD student at the Halle Institute of Economic Research, in the Macroeconomics Department. She was also an economist at the Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg and a research intern at the IMF and the European Central Bank in 2016. Her main research interests are monetary policy and economics, dynamic macroeconomics, and applied time series econometrics. She received an MSc in economics and international economics from the University of Nottingham.

Ding Ding is a senior economist in the IMF Asia and Pacific Department. He is currently the senior desk economist for the China team, as well as mission chief for Kiribati. He previously worked on several advanced and emerging market economies, including Australia, Korea, New Zealand, and Sri Lanka, and has published on a variety of topics, including macro-financial linkages, monetary policy transmission, and macroeconomic modeling and forecasting. He obtained a PhD in economics from Cornell University.

Ichiro Fukunaga is senior economist in the Strategy, Policy, and Review Department of the IMF, where he works on various areas of IMF policy. He is also on the IMF country team for Thailand in the Asia and Pacific Department. Before joining the IMF in 2015, he was senior economist at the Bank of Japan, where he worked on macroeconomic projections and modeling, economic analysis, and financial market analysis. He received his PhD in economics from the London School of Economics and his MA and BA in economics from the University of Tokyo.

Juan Angel Garcia is currently senior economist for the Thailand team in the Asia and Pacific Department of the IMF. Before joining the IMF, he worked at the European Central Bank in several departments and divisions, including Directorate General Research, Capital Markets and Financial Structure, and Euro Area Macroeconomic Developments. His areas of expertise are macroeconomics, asset pricing, and inflation expectations. He obtained his PhD in economics from the University of Warwick, United Kingdom.

David Grigorian is a senior economist in the IMF Asia and Pacific Department, on secondment from the Monetary and Capital Markets Department. He holds a PhD in economics from the University of Maryland at College Park, MA in economics from the Central European University, and MSc in industrial engineering from the American University of Armenia. Throughout his career in the Monetary and Capital markets Department (2009–16), he dealt with a wide array of emerging and advanced market countries (including The Bahamas, Barbados, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Greece, Jamaica, Kuwait, Morocco, Tunisia, and Vietnam) on issues such as sovereign and corporate debt restructuring, debt market development, and financial crisis management. In his previous position as desk economist on Iraq (2006–09), he helped the authorities prepare the macroeconomic framework under occupation and draft federal budgets for 2007, 2008, and 2009. He has published on a range of issues, including banking and capital markets, growth and institutions, remittances, and fiscal performance, and his research is cited widely.

Jaime Guajardo is a senior economist in the IMF Asia and Pacific Department. He works in the ASEAN-4 Division as a desk economist for Indonesia. He has been at the IMF for 13 years and in his current department for the past 4. Before that he worked in the Research Department, IMF Institute, and European Department. He did his undergraduate and master level studies at the Universidad de Chile, and he has a PhD in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles. He is a citizen of Chile.

Hoe Ee Khor is chief economist and a senior management member of the ASEAN+3 Macroeconomic and Research Office (AMRO). He is responsible for the surveillance function of AMRO and for leading and managing the macroeconomic and financial market surveillance work on the ASEAN+3 region and its member economies. His previous positions include deputy director of the IMF Asia and Pacific Department, assistant managing director of the Monetary Authority of Singapore, and chief economist of the Abu Dhabi Council for Economic Development. He holds a PhD in economics from Princeton University.

Minsuk Kim is an economist at the IMF. Since joining the IMF in 2011, he has worked extensively in the areas of multilateral surveillance and structural reform and served as a member of IMF missions to several member countries, most recently to the Philippines, Canada, and Pakistan. He holds a PhD in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Rui C. Mano is an economist in the IMF Asia and Pacific Department. He covers China and Hong Kong SAR and previously worked on Mongolia, Korea, and the Philippines. He started his IMF career in the Research Department analyzing multilateral external sector topics, including global imbalances. His research interests are exchange rate risk, foreign exchange intervention, and global imbalances, among others. He holds a PhD in economics from the University of Chicago.

Dirk Muir is a senior economist in the IMF Asia and Pacific Department, where he works in the Australia–New Zealand Division. Previously, he was a long-standing member of the Research Department’s Economic Modeling Division, focused on developing and using large-scale macroeconomic models. He has worked on a large variety of issues in international economics using models, including Australian links with China, oil markets, and global rebalancing, as well as Australian fiscal policy, Italian and European structural reform, and issues more generally related to fiscal consolidation and multipliers. He holds an MA in economics from Queen’s University (Canada). He held a variety of positions before joining the IMF, at the Bank of Canada, the Department of Finance of Canada, the Norges Bank, the European Central Bank, and Deutsche Bank Global Markets London.

Pablo Lopez Murphy is deputy division chief in the Regional Studies Division of the IMF Asia and Pacific Department. He leads the IMF country team on Fiji. Before taking this position, he was senior economist for the team that followed Greece during 2014–16 and for the Spain team during 2012–14, in the European Department. Between 2009 and 2011 he was in the Fiscal Affairs Department, where he worked on the teams that followed Mexico and Lebanon. He also participated in technical assistance missions to Hungary, Jordan, Botswana, and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. His areas of expertise are international macroeconomics and public finance. He received a PhD in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles, and a Licenciate in economics from the Universidad Nacional de La Plata in 1998.

Shanaka Jayanath (Jay) Peiris is currently the IMF Asia and Pacific Department’s mission chief for Myanmar and deputy division chief of the ASEAN-2 Division, covering ASEAN macro-financial surveillance for the Asia and Pacific Department. Previously he was the IMF’s resident representative in the Philippines, senior economist in the Asia and Pacific and Monetary and Capital Markets Departments covering Association of Southeast Asian Nation countries and south Asia, and mission chief to Pacific island countries, and he led a sub-working group on asset price risks for the G20 Mutual Assessment Process. He has also worked on eastern and southern Africa. He joined the IMF in 2001 after receiving his PhD in economics at Oxford University. He was a lecturer in mathematical economics and econometrics at Sommerville College and Jesus College, Oxford. Earlier, he interned at Deutsche Bank AG and the World Bank.

Aubrey Poon is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Strathclyde and a research associate at the Centre of Applied Macroeconomic Analysis at the Australian National University. His main field of research is applied macroeconometrics, especially in the application of time-varying parameters and stochastic volatility models to macroeconomic issues, such as business cycle analysis, forecasting, and inflation modeling. He received both his PhD and master’s in economics at the Australian National University.

Khristine L. Racoma is an economic analyst on secondment in the IMF Resident Representative Office in Manila, Philippines, where she conducts research and works on analytical notes provided to the IMF mission team. She handles requests for collection of information and analysis on the tax reform and fiscal and real policy issues. Before coming to the IMF, she worked as an economist II in the Research and Information Office of the Department of Finance of the Philippines. Her major tasks included quantitative analysis of the department’s comprehensive tax reform program. She received her bachelor’s in economics from the University of Santo Tomas.

Sohrab Rafiq is an economist in the IMF Asia and Pacific Department. In addition to participation in surveillance missions to member countries, he has been involved in supporting and negotiating a number of IMF-led programs. He previously worked as an economist for the European Central Bank in Frankfurt and the government of Malaysia’s sovereign wealth fund (Khazanah Nasional) in Kuala Lumpur. He holds a PhD in economics from the University of Nottingham, with a specialization in macroeconometrics. He has published numerous peer-reviewed journal articles in the areas of macroeconomics and macroeconometrics.

Sherillyn R. Raga was a research associate at the IMF Resident Representative Office in Manila, Philippines, on secondment with the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas in 2015–16, where she drafted the ASEAN-5 financial market page for a monthly regional economic monitor, contributed to the IMF Cluster Report on the Evolution of Monetary Policy Frameworks in the ASEAN-5, and was a team member for the IMF Article IV Mission to the Republic of Palau. Previously she worked more than five years in the Bangko Sentral International Relations Department, where she prepared the central bank’s positions regarding Association of Southeast Asian Nations financial integration, the World Trade Organization, bilateral central bank cooperation initiatives, and regional capacity-building activities, among others. She obtained her economics degree from the University of the Philippines and is currently a candidate for an MSc in economics for development at Oxford University.

Umang Rawat is an economist in the Monetary and Capital Markets Department of the IMF, where he works on issues related to monetary, macroprudential, and exchange rate policies. Previously, he worked in the Asia and Pacific Department covering monetary and financial sector issues for Singapore and as part of the IMF’s Regional Economic Outlook for Asia and the Pacific in 2017. He has also worked extensively on issues related to the IMF’s special drawing rights (SDRs), including review of the renminbi’s inclusion in the SDR basket. His areas of expertise include macroeconomic analysis, business cycle dynamics, monetary policy, and macro-financial linkages. He holds a PhD and bachelor’s in economics from the University of Cambridge.

Manrique Sáenz is currently senior economist for the Thailand team in the Asia and Pacific Department of the IMF. During his IMF career, he has gained ample experience on emerging market issues, including fiscal sustainability, international capital flows, and the impact of the global financial crisis on emerging markets. During 2011–14 he was senior advisor for the minister of finance of Costa Rica, where he worked on fiscal reform, social security issues (health insurance and pensions system), and domestic fiscal financing, among others. Before joining the IMF in 2005, he worked at the Central Bank of Costa Rica as a researcher and advisor to the governor. His areas of expertise are macroeconomics and fiscal policy. He obtained his PhD in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Xiaohui Wu was a summer intern in the IMF Asia and Pacific Department in 2017 and is a PhD candidate at George Washington University. Her research interests include international finance and nonlinear econometrics models. She has done research on nonlinear behavior of capital flows and exchange rates. She received her MA in economics from George Washington University in 2014. Before that, she worked in the audit department of KPMG China from 2008 to 2011, where she specialized in financial auditing of the manufacturing and telecommunications sectors. She received a BA in economics and law from Xiamen University in 2008.

Yiqun Wu is currently an economist in the ASEAN-2 Division of the IMF Asia and Pacific Department, covering Myanmar and Thailand. Previously, he was the main desk economist for the Solomon Islands, a program country under the Extended Credit Facility. He has worked in the Asia and Pacific Department’s Regional Studies Division and coauthored several cross-country analytical chapters in the Asia and Pacific Regional Economic Outlook. His country experience at the IMF includes Kiribati, Palau, and Papua New Guinea, and he has contributed to the IMF’s research and policy agenda in small states, including two IMF Board papers and several policy papers. His areas of expertise include macroeconomics, international economics, and economic growth and development. He obtained his PhD in economics from the State University of New York, Buffalo.

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