Chapter

Appendix I Hydrocarbon- and Mineral-Rich Countries, 2000–05

Author(s):
International Monetary Fund
Published Date:
October 2007
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Table 1.Hydrocarbon-Rich Countries, 2000–051, 2
Average Annual Hydrocarbon Revenues 2000–05Average Annual Hydrocarbon Exports (Goods) 2000–05Energy Depletion (2004)4Oil Proved Reserves (2004)5Gas Proved Reserves(2004)5
In percent of total fiscal revenue3In percent of GDPIn percent of total exports (goods)In percent of GDPIn percentof gross national incomeIn percent of world reservesIn percent of world reserves
Algeria*70.526.397.636.835.20.992.54
Angola79.833.491.868.045.00.76
Azerbaijan*33.38.587.336.154.60.590.77
Bahrain71.323.274.453.735.70.05
Brunei Darussalam87.740.590.158.60.090.19
Cameroon*27.74.844.78.310.8
Colombia*10.03.026.74.47.20.120.07
Congo, Republic of69.622.288.368.754.10.15
Ecuador26.06.646.911.819.00.42
Equatorial Guinea*85.224.496.893.10.15
Gabon*60.119.281.747.525.50.18
Indonesia*30.35.522.87.39.40.361.55
Iran, Islamic Rep. of*65.514.782.224.236.011.1214.94
Iraq679.269.597.069.49.631.77
Kazakhstan*25.16.352.624.139.93.321.68
Kuwait74.746.192.245.146.88.500.88
Libya80.243.297.153.660.73.280.83
Mexico*33.37.517.23.07.41.240.23
Nigeria78.932.397.246.249.13.002.92
Norway24.013.060.019.810.90.811.33
Oman83.438.680.945.358.80.470.56
Qatar68.426.078.546.81.2714.40
Russia*19.57.354.017.929.76.0726.70
Saudi Arabia83.131.388.839.850.122.133.82
Sudan49.88.380.612.915.10.54
Syrian Arab Republic46.312.870.224.638.60.260.17
Trinidad and Tobago36.49.359.928.446.20.070.30
Turkmenistan43.28.783.528.70.051.62
United Arab Emirates66.119.742.432.629.28.193.39
Uzbekistan59.30.051.04
Venezuela48.815.882.525.834.76.682.39
Vietnam31.27.421.311.09.50.260.13
Yemen71.524.988.132.744.20.240.27
Average55.020.671.135.234.42.933.25
Countries with potentially large medium- and long-term hydrocarbon revenue
Bolivia20.95.623.05.015.40.42
Chad731.03.880.842.979.10.08
Mauritania*
São Tomé and Príncipe857.773.4
Timor-Leste63.838.872.126.0
Sources: IMF, Executive Board documents, World Economic Outlook (WEO) database, and staff estimates; World Bank, World Development Indicators.

For countries with an asterisk (*), a fiscal Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes (ROSC) has been published by the IMF.

Table 1 includes all countries that are considered rich in hydrocarbons and/or mineral resources on the basis of the following criteria: (i) an average share of hydrocarbon and/or mineral fiscal revenues in total fiscal revenue of at least 25 percent during the period 2000-05 or (ii) an average share of hydrocarbon and/or mineral export proceeds in total export proceeds of at least 25 percent.

Revenues including grants.

World Bank World Development Indicators definition. Energy depletion is equal to the product of unit resource rents and the physical quantities of energy extracted. It covers coal, crude oil, and natural gas.

Source: BP, 2006.

Fiscal information available for 2004–05.

Information available for 2004–05.

Information available for 2005.

Sources: IMF, Executive Board documents, World Economic Outlook (WEO) database, and staff estimates; World Bank, World Development Indicators.

For countries with an asterisk (*), a fiscal Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes (ROSC) has been published by the IMF.

Table 1 includes all countries that are considered rich in hydrocarbons and/or mineral resources on the basis of the following criteria: (i) an average share of hydrocarbon and/or mineral fiscal revenues in total fiscal revenue of at least 25 percent during the period 2000-05 or (ii) an average share of hydrocarbon and/or mineral export proceeds in total export proceeds of at least 25 percent.

Revenues including grants.

World Bank World Development Indicators definition. Energy depletion is equal to the product of unit resource rents and the physical quantities of energy extracted. It covers coal, crude oil, and natural gas.

Source: BP, 2006.

Fiscal information available for 2004–05.

Information available for 2004–05.

Information available for 2005.

Table 2.Mineral-Rich Countries, 2000–051, 2
Average Annual Mineral Revenues 2000–05Average Annual Mineral Exports 2000–05Mineral Depletion (2004)4
CountryMineralIn percent of total fiscal revenue3In percent of GDPIn percent of total exports (goods)In percent of of GDPIn percent of gross national income
BotswanaDiamonds62.520.679.532.3
Chile*Copper9.42.239.111.710.8
Dem. Republic of CongoDiamonds52.711.9
Ghana*Gold33.411.00.2
GuineaBauxite/aluminum17.82.487.719.01.9
Indonesia*Tin, copper, gold, silver7.32.31.6
Jordan*Phosphates, potash0.70.212.43.50.1
Kyrgyz Republic*Gold1.70.339.112.5
LiberiaDiamonds
MauritaniaIron ore53.416.210.9
Mongolia*Copper, gold8.22.951.226.38.4
NamibiaDiamonds5.91.959.920.0
Papua New Guinea*Gold17.95.677.647.925.1
Peru*Gold, copper, silver3.31.550.88.12.1
Sierra LeoneDiamonds, bauxite, rutile0.90.287.010.1
South AfricaGold, platinum, coal27.26.40.6
UzbekistanGold29.88.6
ZambiaCopper60.516.63.7
Average12.83.849.915.66.0
Sources: IMF, Executive Board documents, World Economic Outlook (WEO) database, and staff estimates; World Bank, World Development Indicators.

For countries with an asterisk (*), a fiscal Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes (ROSC) has been published by the IMF.

Table 2 includes countries that are considered rich in hydrocarbons and/or mineral resources on the basis of the following criteria: (1) an average share of hydrocarbon and/or mineral fiscal revenues in total fiscal revenue of at least 25 percent during the period 2000–05 or (2) an average share of hydrocarbon and/or mineral export proceeds in total export proceeds of at least 25 percent during the period 2000-05. Two countries (Indonesia and Jordan) do not meet the data criteria to be in the list but are included owing to the relevant importance of minerals in their economies. Indonesia, Mauritania, and Uzbekistan have substantial hydrocarbon resources.

Revenues including grants.

World Bank World Development Indicators definition. Mineral depletion is equal to the product of unit resource rents and the physical quantities of minerals extracted. It refers to tin, gold, lead, zinc, iron, copper, nickel, silver, bauxite, and phosphate.

Sources: IMF, Executive Board documents, World Economic Outlook (WEO) database, and staff estimates; World Bank, World Development Indicators.

For countries with an asterisk (*), a fiscal Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes (ROSC) has been published by the IMF.

Table 2 includes countries that are considered rich in hydrocarbons and/or mineral resources on the basis of the following criteria: (1) an average share of hydrocarbon and/or mineral fiscal revenues in total fiscal revenue of at least 25 percent during the period 2000–05 or (2) an average share of hydrocarbon and/or mineral export proceeds in total export proceeds of at least 25 percent during the period 2000-05. Two countries (Indonesia and Jordan) do not meet the data criteria to be in the list but are included owing to the relevant importance of minerals in their economies. Indonesia, Mauritania, and Uzbekistan have substantial hydrocarbon resources.

Revenues including grants.

World Bank World Development Indicators definition. Mineral depletion is equal to the product of unit resource rents and the physical quantities of minerals extracted. It refers to tin, gold, lead, zinc, iron, copper, nickel, silver, bauxite, and phosphate.

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