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At a Glance

Author(s):
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
Published Date:
January 2006
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Key IMF indicators(as of July 31, 2005, unless indicated)
Membership184 countries
HeadquartersWashington DC
Executive Board24 members
Total staff2,700
Total quotas$310 billion (SDR 213.5 billion)
Quotas
LargestUnited States (17.5% of total)
SmallestPalau (0.001% of total)
Lending resources
Available resources1$169 billion (SDR 116.2 billion)
One-year forward
commitment capacity2$133 billion (SDR 91.8 billion)
Credit lines3
Credit available under
borrowing arrangements$49 billion (SDR 34 billion)
Reserves
Precautionary balances4$11 billion (SDR 7.4 billion)
Other assets
Gold holdings103.4 million fine ounces
Value on IMF books$8 billion (SDR 5.9 billion)
Market value$44 billion (at $429/oz.)
Credit outstanding
Total credit5$73 billion (SDR 49.8 billion)
To low-income countries on special terms$10 billion (SDR 6.6 billion)
To other member countries$63 billion (SDR 43.2 billion)
Current lending arrangements
Stand-By Arrangements11
Extended Fund Facility2
Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility27
Biggest borrowers
Turkey$17 billion (SDR 12 billion)
Brazil$16 billion (SDR 10.8 billion)
Argentina$11 billion (SDR 7.6 billion)
Indonesia$8 billion (SDR 5.9 billion)
Uruguay$2 billion (SDR 1.7 billion)
Debt relief for Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPCs)
Full debt relief, having met all criteria18 countries
Some debt relief, but must meet
additional criteria for full debt relief10 countries
Still to be considered10 countries
Total debt relief for HIPC6$58 billion at end-2004
Cost to IMF6$5 billion at end-2004
Note:

The gross amount of money the IMF has available for lending minus money that has been committed, but not yet paid out, under existing loan programs with member countries.

The primary measure of IMF liquidity. It is calculated by adding loan repayments scheduled in the coming year to available resources and then subtracting a prudential balance set at $52 billion (SDR 34.0 billion) for fiscal year 2005.

The IMF has two credit lines it can access if it needs additional liquidity. These are known as the General Arrangements to Borrow (GAB) and the New Arrangements to Borrow (NAB). The last time these credit lines were activated was in 1998.

The IMF accumulates reserves to protect itself and its creditor members from losses in the event of nonpayment of loans. This figure does not include the IMF’s gold holdings.

Details may not add as a result of rounding.

Net present value.

Data: IMF Finance Department.
Note:

The gross amount of money the IMF has available for lending minus money that has been committed, but not yet paid out, under existing loan programs with member countries.

The primary measure of IMF liquidity. It is calculated by adding loan repayments scheduled in the coming year to available resources and then subtracting a prudential balance set at $52 billion (SDR 34.0 billion) for fiscal year 2005.

The IMF has two credit lines it can access if it needs additional liquidity. These are known as the General Arrangements to Borrow (GAB) and the New Arrangements to Borrow (NAB). The last time these credit lines were activated was in 1998.

The IMF accumulates reserves to protect itself and its creditor members from losses in the event of nonpayment of loans. This figure does not include the IMF’s gold holdings.

Details may not add as a result of rounding.

Net present value.

Data: IMF Finance Department.

SDRs explained

Special Drawing Rights or SDRs are an international reserve asset, created by the IMF in 1969 to supplement the existing official reserves of member countries. SDRs are allocated to member countries in proportion to their quotas. The SDR also serves as the unit of account of the IMF. Its value is based on a basket of key international currencies. U.S. dollar amounts are calculated at the rate of SDR 1 = $1.45186 (July 31, 2005) and are rounded.

Finding out more …

The best way to find out more about the IMF is to look at its website (www.imf.org). The biweekly IMF Survey and the quarterly Finance & Development are also good sources of information about policies and research.

Critical assessments of IMF policies and procedures can be found on the website of the Independent Evaluation Office (www.imf.org/external/np/ieo/index.htm).

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