Back Matter

Back Matter

Author(s):
International Monetary Fund
Published Date:
September 1960
Share
  • ShareShare
Show Summary Details

INDEX

  • Administrative Budget, Fund—159, 180, 181

  • Advance Deposits for Imports—116, 117, 123, 128, 131, 135

  • Agricultural Surpluses—11

  • Argentina—advance deposits for imports, 128;

    • balance of payments, 60, 69 (table), 70 (table), 106-07;

    • exchange system, 106, 127-28;

    • gold and foreign exchange reserves, 54, 107;

    • monetary policy, 58, 106;

    • money supply, 55 (table);

    • stabilization program, effects of, 106;

    • stand-by arrangement with Fund, 18

  • Articles VIII and XIV—7-8, 29-31

  • Assets, Fundsee Fund’s Resources

  • Audit Committee, Fund—159

  • Australia—balance of payments, 59, 71 (table), 72 (table), 104-05;

    • financial policy, 104-05;

    • Fund quota, increase in, 14;

    • gold production, 143;

    • gold subsidy program, 144;

    • interest rates, 40 (table)

  • Austria—balance of payments, 46 (table), 68 (table);

    • cost of living, employment, industrial production, and wages, 35 (table)

  • Balance of Payments—developments in 1959-60, 2-4, 58-74;

    • effect of external convertibility, 2, 16, 122-23;

    • liberalization of payments, 38;

    • measures to meet imbalances, 4, 5, 63;

    • see also entries under various countries

  • Balance Sheets—Fund, 186-87;

    • Staff Retirement Fund, 202

  • Banks, Commercialsee Commercial Banks

  • Belgium-Luxembourg—balance of payments, 46 (table), 68 (table);

    • cost of living, employment, industrial production, and wages, 35 (table);

    • financial policy, 39, 42, 43;

    • gold and gold coins, prices in Brussels, 153, 155;

    • interest rates, 40 (table)

  • Bilateral Payments Arrangements—11, 29, 123

  • Bolivia—balance of payments, 69 (table), 70 (table);

    • currency purchase from Fund, 15;

    • exchange rate, 127;

    • money supply, 55 (table);

    • stand-by arrangement with Fund, 18

  • Brazil—balance of payments, 69 (table), 70 (table), 107-08;

    • exchange system, 107, 128-29;

    • financial policy, 58, 107;

    • money supply, 55 (table)

  • Budget, Fund—159, 180, 181

  • Burma—balance of payments, 71 (table), 72 (table);

    • exports, 51;

    • money supply, 55 (table)

  • Butter Prices—51

  • Canada—balance of payments, 73 (table), 102-04;

    • commercial banks, loan to Venezuela, 19, 120;

    • cost of living, employment, industrial production, and wages, 35 (table);

    • exchange rate, 125-26;

    • financial policy, 39, 41, 102;

    • gold certificates, 150-51;

    • gold production, 143;

    • gold subsidy program, 144;

    • interest rates, 40 (table), 51, 102, 126

  • Capital and Money Markets—interdependence of, 4-5

  • Capital Payments, Liberalization of—2, 4, 38, 123

  • Central American Common Market—139-40

  • Ceylon—balance of payments, 71 (table), 72 (table);

    • fiscal policy, 57;

    • money supply, 55 (table);

    • tea exports and prices, 50

  • Charges, Fund—25-26

  • Chile—advance deposits for imports, 116;

    • balance of payments, 69 (table), 70 (table), 115-16;

    • exchange rate, 127;

    • financial policy, 116;

    • industrial production, 116;

    • inflation, 116;

    • monetary unit, escudo, establishment of, 127;

    • prices, 115, 116

  • China (Taiwan)—balance of payments, 73 (table);

    • exchange system, 129

  • Cocoa Exports and Prices—50

  • Coffee—exports and prices, 50;

  • international agreement, 50

  • Colombia—advance deposits for imports, 117;

    • balance of payments, 69 (table), 70 (table), 116-17;

    • coffee stockpiling, financing of, 117;

    • exchange system, 117, 129-30;

    • financial policy, 54, 117;

    • gold production, 143;

    • gold subsidy program, 144;

    • money supply, 55 (table);

    • stand-by arrangement with Fund, 18

  • Commercial Banks—bank balances, movements of, 5;

    • competitiveness in commercial financing, 5;

    • foreign exchange holdings, 5, 65;

    • foreign exchange transactions, freedom in, 5, 79

  • Compensatory Financing of Commodity Fluctuations, Fund Study—9

  • Competitiveness of Industrial Countries—2-3, 5, 48, 81

  • Consultations of Members with Fund—7-8, 28-30

  • Contracyclical Policy—37

  • Convertibility of Currenciessee Exchange Convertibility

  • Copper Prices and Production—51-52

  • Cost of Living—1, 35 (table), 36

  • Costa Rica—balance of payments, 69 (table), 70 (table)

  • Cotton—exports and prices, 51;

    • U.S. export subsidy, 51, 82

  • Credit Policy—37-44, 53-58

  • Cuba—balance of payments, 69 (table), 70 (table);

    • exchange system, 130;

    • gold imports, controls on, 152

  • Currency Holdings, Fundsee Fund’s Resources

  • Currency Purchases and Repurchasessee Fund’s Resources

  • Denmark—balance of payments, 46 (table), 68 (table);

    • cost of living, employment, industrial production, and wages, 35 (table);

    • financial policy, 39, 42, 43;

    • interest rates, 40 (table)

  • Discount Ratessee Interest Rates

  • Discriminatory Exchange Practices—2, 26-29, 179

  • Dominican Republic—balance of payments, 69 (table), 70 (table);

    • fiscal policy, 57;

    • money supply, 55 (table);

    • stand-by arrangement with Fund, 18

  • Economic Associations, Regional—11, 137-40

  • Ecuador—balance of payments, 69 (table), 70 (table);

    • money supply, 55 (table)

  • Egyptian Region, U.A.R.—balance of payments, 73 (table), 74 (table), 108-09;

    • cotton export policy, 109;

    • currency purchase from Fund, 15;

    • financial policy, 109;

    • money supply, 55 (table);

    • trade and exchange system, 134-35

  • El Salvador—balance of payments, 69 (table), 70 (table);

    • stand-by arrangement with Fund, 18, 21

  • Employment—4, 34-37

  • Ethiopia—balance of payments, 73 (table), 74 (table)

  • Europe—balance of payments, 58-67;

    • balance of payments equilibrium, measures to maintain, 4, 63;

    • capital payments, liberalization of, 4, 123;

    • competitive strength, 3, 48, 81;

    • exchange convertibility, 2, 66-67, 122-23;

    • exchange rates, 31, 123;

    • financial policy, 37-44;

    • gold reserves, 64, 145-49;

    • industrial production, prices, and employment, 34-37

  • European Economic Community—137

  • European Free Trade Association—138

  • European Fund—17, 18, 136

  • European Monetary Argeement—135-36

  • European Payments Union—effects of termination, 65-66

  • Exchange Convertibility—convertibility of currencies of Fund members, 122;

    • effect on capital and money markets, 4-5;

    • effect on international payments position, 2, 16, 122-23;

    • effect on usability of Fund’s holdings of members’currencies, 66-67

  • Exchange Margins—31

  • Exchange Practices—developments in 1959, 122-35;

    • discriminatory practices, 2, 26-29, 179

  • Exchange Rates—changes in 1959, 124-35;

    • par values, 124-27;

    • Western European currencies, 31, 123

  • Exchange Reservessee Reserves

  • Exchange Restrictions—consultations on, 28-30;

    • reduction of, 28, 122

  • Exchange Systems—28, 122-35

  • Executive Board Decisions—Articles VIII and XIV, 7, 29-31;

    • bilateral payments arrangements, 29;

    • discrimination for balance of payments reasons, 2, 26-29, 179;

    • exchange margins, 31;

    • investment of Fund assets, 26, 178;

    • multiple rate systems, 28

  • Executive Board Membership and Voting Power—172-76

  • Expenditure, Fund—158, 180-82, 188

  • Fiji—gold subsidy program, 144

  • Financial Policy—3, 4, 36, 37-44, 53-58; see also entries under various countries

  • Financial Statements, Fund—180-205

  • Finland—balance of payments, 73 (table), 74 (table)

  • Foreign Exchange Reservessee Reserves

  • Franc Area—balance of payments, 73 (table), 94-95;

    • official foreign exchange position, 94

  • France—assistance from Fund and OEEC, 32;

    • balance of payments, 46 (table), 61, 68 (table), 93-96;

    • competitive position, 49;

    • cost of living, employment, industrial production, and wages, 35 (table), 93, 95;

    • currency repurchase from Fund, 94;

    • devaluation of franc, effects of, 48, 49, 95;

    • export prices, 48;

    • financial policy, 94-95;

    • gold and gold coins, prices in Paris, 154, 155;

    • gold purchases from U.S., 147;

    • interest rates, 40 (table), 41;

    • money supply, 94;

    • “new franc,”127

  • Fund Liquidity—20

  • Fund Members—consultations with Fund, 7-8, 28-30;

    • geographical distribution of members purchasing and repurchasing currencies and concluding stand-by arrangements, 14, 15, 21;

    • list, 163-66;

    • obligations under Articles VIII and XIV, 7, 29-31;

    • subscriptions to capital, status of, 196-97

  • Fund Staff—158

  • Fund Studies—compensatory financing of commodity fluctuations, 9;

    • payments problems within Latin American Free Trade Area, 139

  • Fund Technical Assistance to Members—158

  • Fund’s European Office—158

  • Fund’s Resources—availability of, 10;

    • charges on use of, 25-26;

    • contribution to consolidation of world payments system, 5-6;

    • currencies purchased, 21, 22 (table), 24 (table);

    • currency purchases, 14-26, 66, 177 (table);

    • currency purchases owing to decline in export earnings, 9;

    • currency purchases, use of waiver, 21;

    • currency repurchases, 14-26, 66, 94, 115, 119, 177 (table);

    • gold and currency holdings, 6, 20, 63, 66, 146, 191, 192-95;

    • investment of, 26, 178;

    • revolving character of, 6-7, 20, 25, 67;

    • significance of, 6;

    • stand-by arrangements, 15 (table), 16-22, 23 (table), 58, 112, 120, 121;

    • support to stabilization programs, 10, 16;

    • use of, 6-7, 14-26

    • GATT—Fund cooperation, 32-33;

    • statement on discriminatory exchange practices, 2, 27

  • Germany, Federal Republic of—balance of payments, 46 (table), 68 (table), 89-93;

    • capital movements, discouragement of, 4, 43;

    • 90, 92;

    • cost of living, employment, industrial production, and wages, 35 (table), 37, 90;

    • gold and foreign exchange reserves, 60 (table), 92-93;

    • gold and gold coins, transactions in, 154;

    • gold certificates, 151;

    • gold coins, price in Frankfurt, 155;

    • monetary policy and interest rates, 39, 40 (table), 41, 43, 90-92

  • Ghana—balance of payments, 71 (table), 72 (table);

    • gold production, 142;

    • treasury bills, 58

  • Gold—absorption by arts, industries, and private holders, 145, 152;

    • certificates, transferable, 150-51;

    • coins, prices of, 155;

    • earmarked, 148;

    • markets and prices, 149-55;

    • production, 141-45;

    • production costs, 143-45;

    • reserves, 63, 64 (table), 145-49;

    • reserves, official, versus hoarded gold, 152;

    • sales to private purchasers, 144, 150-51;

    • subsidy programs, 144-45;

    • transactions service, Fund, 156

  • Gold and Foreign Exchange Reservessee Reserves, Gold and Foreign Exchange

  • Gold Holdings, Fund—6, 20, 63, 66, 146, 191

  • Governors, Board of—membership and voting power, 163-71

  • Greece—balance of payments, 73 (table), 74 (table);

    • credit from European Fund, cancellation of, 136;

    • exchange rate, 125

  • Guatemala—balance of payments, 69 (table), 70 (table)

  • Haiti—balance of payments, 69 (table), 70 (table);

    • currency purchase from Fund, 15;

    • fiscal policy, 57;

    • stand-by arrangement with Fund, 18, 21

  • Honduras—balance of payments, 69 (table), 70 (table);

    • financial policy, 54, 57;

    • gold and foreign exchange reserves, 57;

    • money supply, 55 (table);

    • stand-by arrangement with Fund, 18

  • Hong Kong—balance of payments, 71 (table), 72 (table);

    • gold price, 154

  • “Hot Money”—5

  • Iceland—assistance from Fund and OEEC, 32;

    • balance of payments, 71 (table);

    • currency purchase from Fund, 18;

    • loan from European Fund, 18, 136;

    • par value, 18, 125;

    • stabilization program, 18, 125;

    • stand-by arrangement with Fund, 18

  • Income, Fund—158, 182, 188

  • India—agricultural and industrial production, 100;

    • balance of payments, 59, 71 (table), 72 (table), 100-01;

    • gold price in Bombay, 154;

    • gold production, 154;

    • gold supply, 154;

    • monetary policy, 58, 101;

    • money supply, 55 (table), 101;

    • tea exports and prices, 50;

    • wholesale prices, 101

  • Indonesia—advance deposits for imports, 131;

    • balance of payments, 73 (table), 74 (table);

    • exchange system, 130-31;

    • financial policy, 57;

    • money supply, 55 (table)

  • Industrial Countries—balance of payments, 2-4, 44-49, 58-68;

    • competitiveness, 2-3, 5, 48, 81;

    • cost of living, 35 (table);

    • employment, 34-37;

    • financial policies, 3-5, 37-44;

    • gold and foreign exchange reserves, 3, 38, 60 (table);

    • industrial production, 1, 34-37;

    • measures to maintain international payments equilibrium, 4, 63;

    • prices, 1, 34-37;

    • responsibility to less developed countries, 11;

    • tariff and other trade policies, 11-12;

    • wages, 35 (table)

  • Industrial Countries Other than United States—aid to less developed countries, 4;

    • debt repayment, 4, 63;

    • discrimination against dollar goods, removal of, 4, 63;

    • financial policies, 3-5, 37-44;

    • gold and foreign exchange reserves, 59, 60 (table), 64;

    • gold reserves, official, 64 (table);

    • industrial expansion, effects of, 4

  • Industrial Production—1, 34-37

  • Inflation—1, 11, 56

  • Interest Rates—5, 37-44, 58

  • International Coffee Agreement—50

  • International Organizations—Fund cooperation, 32-33;

    • gold holdings, 64 (table);

    • interest in problems of primary producing countries, 8-9

  • International Paymentssee Balance of Payments

  • Iran—balance of payments, 73 (table), 74 (table), 111;

    • financial policy, 111

  • Iraq—balance of payments, 73 (table), 74 (table)

  • Ireland—balance of payments, 71 (table), 72 (table)

  • Israel—balance of payments, 73 (table), 74 (table);

    • financial policy, 54;

    • money supply, 55 (table)

  • Italy—balance of payments, 46 (table), 61, 68 (table), 96-98;

    • cost of living, employment, industrial production, and wages, 35 (table), 97, 98;

    • financial policy and interest rates, 40 (table), 41, 43, 96-98;

    • gold and foreign exchange reserves, 60 (table), 62, 96, 97;

    • gold and gold coins, prices in Milan, 153, 155;

    • par value, 125

  • Japan—balance of payments, 46 (table), 61, 68 (table), 98-100;

    • cost of living, employment, industrial production, and wages, 34, 35 (table), 98;

    • competitive strength, 3, 48, 81;

    • exchange convertibility, 99;

    • financial policy, 39, 98-100;

    • gold production, 143

  • Jordan—balance of payments, 71 (table)

  • Korea—balance of payments, 73 (table);

    • exchange system, 131-32;

    • money supply, 55 (table)

  • Laos—Fund membership, application for, 13

  • Latin America—balance of payments, 60, 69 (table), 70 (table);

    • currency purchases from Fund, 14;

    • gold reserves, 146, 147, 148;

    • terms of trade, 53

  • Latin American Free Trade Area and Free Trade Association—138-39

  • Lebanon—exchange rate, 126;

    • gold and gold coins, prices in Beirut, 153, 155

  • Less Developed Countriessee Primary Producing Countries

  • Libya—balance of payments, 71 (table);

    • par value, 124

  • Liquidity, World—3, 65-67

  • Livestock Products—prices, 51

  • London Gold Market—149-50, 152-53, 155

  • Luxembourgsee Belgium-Luxembourg

  • Malaya, Federation of—balance of payments, 71 (table), 72 (table), 113;

    • exchange rate, 125;

    • financial policy, 58, 113

  • Manufacturing Countriessee Industrial Countries

  • Meat Prices—51

  • Members, Fundsee Fund Members

  • Metals Prices—51

  • Mexico—balance of payments, 69 (table), 70 (table), 117-18;

    • financial policy, 118;

    • gold production, 143;

    • money supply, 55 (table), 118

  • Monetary Policy—3, 4, 36, 37-44, 53-58

  • Monetary Reserves—computation of, for determining repurchase obligations of Fund members, 7;

    • reports by Fund members, 26

  • Money and Capital Markets—interdependence of, 4-5

  • Morocco—balance of payments, 73 (table), 74 (table);

    • par value, 124;

    • stand-by arrangement with Fund, 19

  • Multilateral Payments System—progress toward, 27-28

  • Multiple Rate Systems—Executive Board decision, 28

  • Nepal—Fund membership, application for, 13

  • Netherlands—balance of payments, 46 (table), 68 (table);

    • cost of living, employment, industrial production, and wages, 35 (table);

    • exports, 49;

    • interest rates, 40 (table)

  • New Zealand—balance of payments, 71 (table), 72 (table);

    • interest rates, 40 (table)

  • Nicaragua—balance of payments, 69 (table), 70 (table);

    • financial policy, 54;

    • money supply, 55 (table)

  • Nigeria—foreign trade, 72 (table);

    • Fund membership, application for, 13;

    • treasury bills, 58

  • Norway—balance of payments, 46 (table), 68 (table);

    • cost of living, employment, production, and wages, 35 (table);

    • interest rates, 40 (table)

  • OEEC—Fund cooperation, 32

  • Pakistan—balance of payments, 71 (table), 72 (table), 112-13;

    • financial policy, 112;

    • money supply, 55 (table);

    • stand-by arrangement with Fund, cancellation of, 16, 112

  • Panama—balance of payments, 69 (table), 70 (table)

  • Par Values—17, 18, 124-27, 206-11

  • Paraguay—balance of payments, 69 (table), 70 (table), exchange rate, 127;

    • money supply, 55 (table);

    • stand-by arrangement with Fund, 18

  • Peru—balance of payments, 69 (table), 70 (table), 118-20;

    • currency repurchase from Fund, 119;

    • exchange system, 119, 120, 132;

    • financial policy, 58, 118-20;

    • money supply, 55 (table);

    • stabilization measures, 119;

    • stand-by arrangement with Fund, 18, 120

  • Petroleum Prices and Production—52

  • Philippines—balance of payments, 73 (table), 74 (table), 113-14;

    • exchange system, 113, 132-34;

    • financial policy, 113-14;

    • gold production, 143;

    • “margin fee,” 113, 132-34;

    • money supply, 55 (table), 114

  • Portugal—balance of payments, 73 (table), 74 (table);

    • Fund membership, application for, 13

  • Prices—developments in 1959, 1, 8, 34-37;

    • Fund assistance in connection with price fluctuations, study of, 9;

    • stability, attainment of, 1

  • Primary Producing Countries—balance of payments, 45 (table), 49-53, 69-74 (tables), 100-21;

    • financial policies, 53-58;

    • money supply, 55 (table);

    • prices, 1, 8-9, 49-53;

    • remedies for problems resulting from price fluctuations, 8-12

  • Publications, Fund—158

  • Purchases of Currencysee Fund’s Resources

  • Quotas of Fund Members—aggregate, 14, 163-66;

    • consent to increases in, 13;

    • currency purchases related to increases, 15;

    • payment of increases, 13, 66

  • Regional Arrangements—11, 137-40

  • Repurchases of Currencysee Fund’s Resources

  • Reserves, Goldsee Gold

  • Reserves, Gold and Foreign Exchange—58-67, 69-74 (tables), 80 (table), 85 (table), 91 (table), 103 (table)

  • Rhodesia and Nyasaland—balance of payments, 71 (table), 72 (table)

  • Rhodesia, Southern—gold production, 143

  • Rice Prices—51

  • Rubber Prices and Production—52

  • Saudi Arabia—financial rehabilitation program, 56-57;

    • foreign trade, 74 (table);

    • par value, 124;

    • restrictions on imports and payments, abolition of, 124

  • Security Holdings, Fund—with depositories, 192-95

  • South Africasee Union of South Africa

  • Southern Rhodesiasee Rhodesia

  • Spain—assistance from Fund and OEEC, 32;

    • balance of payments, 73 (table), 74 (table);

    • currency purchase from Fund, 17;

    • loan from European Fund, 17, 136;

    • loan from U.S. banks, 17;

    • par value, 17, 124;

    • stabilization program, 16-17;

    • stand-by arrangement with Fund, 17

  • Stabilization Policies—Argentina, 106;

    • Iceland, 18, 125;

    • obstacles to enforcement, 56;

    • Peru, 119;

    • progress of countries, 56;

    • Spain, 16-17;

    • support from Fund and other sources, 10, 16-18;

    • Turkey, 110-11

  • Staff, Fund—158

  • Stand-By Arrangementssee Fund’s Resources

  • Sterling Area, Overseas—balance of payments, 71 (table), 72 (table);

    • exports, 53;

    • imports, 47;

    • sterling balances, 88;

    • terms of trade, 53

  • Sudan—balance of payments, 73 (table), 74 (table), 110;

    • currency purchase from Fund 15;

    • financial policy, 110

  • Sugar Prices—51

  • Sweden—balance of payments, 46 (table), 68 (table);

    • cost of living, employment, production, and wages, 35 (table);

    • interest rates, 40 (table)

  • Switzerland—balance of payments, 46 (table), 68 (table);

    • gold certificates, 151;

    • gold price in Zürich, 153;

    • interest rates, 40 (table)

  • Syrian Region, U.A.R.—balance of payments, 73 (table), 74 (table), 109-10;

    • exchange rate, 126

  • Tanganyika—gold production, 143

  • Technical Assistance, Fund—158

  • Thailand—balance of payments, 73 (table), 74 (table);

    • exports, 51

  • Tin Prices—51

  • Trade and Tariff Policies—11-12, 137-40

  • Trade, Worldsee World Trade Training Program, Fund—157

  • Transactions, Fundsee Fund’s Resources

  • Treaty of Economic Association, Central American Countries—139-40

  • Treaty of Montevideo—138-39

  • Tunisia—balance of payments, 73 (table), 74 (table)

  • Turkey—assistance from Fund and OEEC, 32;

    • balance of payments, 73 (table), 74 (table), 110-11;

    • exchange system, 134;

    • loan from European Fund, 136;

    • stabilization program, 110-11

  • Underdeveloped Countriessee Primary Producing Countries

  • Unemployment Compensation Payments—“built-in” stabilizing effects, 43

  • Union of South Africa—balance of payments, 71 (table), 72 (table), 114-15;

    • currency repurchase from Fund, 115;

    • financial policy, 114-15;

    • gold bar sales to private purchasers, 144, 151;

    • gold certificates, 150-51;

    • gold mining costs and profits, 143-44;

    • gold production, 115, 141-42;

    • gold sales abroad, widening of, 151;

    • interest rates, 40 (table);

    • uranium industry, 143

  • U.S.S.R.—gold sales, 145, 149;

    • sugar purchases, 51

  • United Arab Republicsee Egyptian Region;

    • Syrian Region

  • United Kingdom—balance of payments, 46 (table), 59, 84-89;

    • cost of living, employment, industrial production, and wages, 35 (table), 86;

    • financial policy, 37-49, 84-89;

    • gold certificates, 150-52;

    • gold exports and imports, 145, 149;

    • gold purchases from U.S., 147;

    • gold reserves, 64, 146, 148, 149;

    • gold sovereigns, price in London, 155;

    • London gold market, 149-50, 152-53;

    • “special deposits”scheme, 89;

    • stand-by arrangement with Fund, termination of, 16;

    • sterling balances, 84, 88

  • United Nations—Fund cooperation, 32

  • United States—balance of payments, 3, 4, 45-49, 58-64, 78-84;

    • balance of payments equilibrium, measures to maintain, 3, 63;

    • budget, 3, 77;

    • commercial banks, loan to Spain, 17;

    • commercial banks, loan to Venezuela, 19, 120;

    • competitive position, 2, 48;

    • construction, 76;

    • cost of living, employment, industrial production, and wages, 35 (table), 36, 47, 76;

    • cotton exports, subsidy on, 51, 82;

    • financial policy, 3, 37-44, 75-78;

    • gold, earmarked, 148;

    • gold production, 142;

    • gold reserves, 3, 146, 147, 148;

    • gross national product, 75-76;

    • investment, private, abroad, 83;

    • loans and grants, 61, 83;

    • postwar international economic policy, 62;

    • prices, 35 (table), 36, 76;

    • trade balance, 45-49, 61

  • Uranium Industry, South Africa—143

  • Uruguay—balance of payments, 69 (table), 70 (table);

    • exchange system, 135

  • Vegetable Oil Prices—51

  • Venezuela—balance of payments, 69 (table), 70 (table), 120-21;

    • financial policy, 57-58, 120-21;

    • Fund quota, increase in, 19;

    • loan from Canadian and U.S. banks, 19, 120;

    • money supply, 55 (table);

    • stand-by arrangement with Fund, 19, 58, 121

  • Viet-Nam—balance of payments, 73 (table), 74 (table)

  • Wages—35 (table), 37

  • Wheat Prices—51

  • Wool Prices—51, 105

  • World Liquidity—3, 65-67

  • World Paymentssee Balance of Payments

  • World Trade—1, 11-12, 44-49

  • Yugoslavia—balance of payments, 73 (table)

  • Zinc Prices—51

Annual Report, 1956, pages 147-48.

Annual Report, 1958, pages 155-56.

Annual Report, 1955, pages 123-24.

    Other Resources Citing This Publication