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International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
After almost a decade of strong growth, the WAEMU region is facing severe challenges from a triple crisis impacting the health, economic and security situations. Both fiscal and monetary policies were relaxed significantly in 2020 to contain the pandemic and support the economy. A gradual fiscal consolidation is expected to start in 2021 and bring back the aggregate fiscal deficit towards the 3 percent of GDP regional ceiling within three years. Growth is expected to recover swiftly in 2021–22 to pre-crisis levels, but the economic outlook is still uncertain.
Huy Nguyen and Miss Randa Sab
This study focuses on identifying the main factors that influenced country-specific and aggregate demand for IMF concessional financing between 1986 and 2018 and makes within-period and out-of-period forecasts. We find that the external debt level, inflation, and real effective exchange rate are the main economic variables influencing concessional borrowing for most eligible countries. Finally, our approach is able to provide quite accurate country-level and aggregate forecasts for historical financing events prior to the COVID-19 pandemic.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
With one of the world’s lowest levels of human development, Niger has enormous needs but only limited own resources to meet them. Insecurity in the Sahel, climate change, and low prices for its uranium exports are further challenges. Niger’s economy performed reasonably well before the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. GDP growth exceeded 6 percent and large foreign projects were attracted, notably a pipeline for the export of crude oil. A new government will take office in April 2021.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
With one of the world’s lowest levels of human development, Niger has enormous needs but only limited own resources to meet them. Insecurity in the Sahel, climate change, and low prices for its uranium exports are further challenges. Niger’s economy performed reasonably well before the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. GDP growth exceeded 6 percent and large foreign projects were attracted, notably a pipeline for the export of crude oil. A new government will take office in April 2021.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This paper discusses Niger’s Requests for Disbursement Under the Rapid Credit Facility and for Rephasing of Access Under the Extended Credit Facility. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is inflicting significant damage on Niger’s economy at a time when the government is already faced with the deteriorating security situation across the Sahel region. A first local infection was reported on March 19, 2020 and a state of emergency was declared on March 27, 2020. The authorities adopted a comprehensive response plan, comprising health care measures and steps to alleviate the social and economic fallout from the crisis. The 5th program review was concluded on January 8, 2019. Performance has since been mixed. Difficulties to reliably recalibrate program parameters while the global COVID-19 crisis is still unfolding preclude the conduct of the 6th program review on the regular schedule. As a result, the authorities previously requested an extension of the program and now request rephasing the final disbursement due to the delay.