Business and Economics > Natural Resource Extraction

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International Monetary Fund. Fiscal Affairs Dept.
In October 2021, the MEF asked Congress for the delegation of powers to legislate on tax matters with the aim of increasing tax collections and doing so by adding progressivity to the Peruvian tax system. The initiative being developed by the MEF contains (tentatively, to date) around 40 specific measures—some administrative, others related to tax policy—that the MEF hopes will, as a whole, generate additional revenue for the treasury. The tax collection impact of quite a few of the measures (including those pertaining to the mining sector) has not been estimated, whereas the measures for which there is a calculation are estimated to bring in a little over 1 percent of GDP in revenues. Given Peru’s low level of tax collections, both relative to its own historical trends as well as those of other countries in the region, the amount expected to be collected with the proposed reform is modest. However, increasing tax collections by enhancing progressivity would appear to be the right approach.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
While the non-mining sector was severely impacted by the COVID-19 crisis, overall growth in Guinea remains strong, reaching 7 percent in 2020, driven by booming mining production. Inflation exceeded 12 percent as a result of COVID-related supply disruptions and the ongoing monetary and fiscal response. The already weak social indicators have deteriorated further.
Ms. Alpa Shah
Mexico has large extractive industries and it traditionally has raised sizable fiscal revenues from the oil and gas sector. A confluence of factors—elevated commodity prices, financial challenges of the state-owned oil company Pemex, and revenue needs for financing social and public investment spending over the medium term—suggest that a review of Mexico’s taxation regimes for natural resources would be opportune, against the backdrop of a comprehensive approach to tackling Mexico’s challenges. This paper identifies opportunities for redesigning mining taxation to increase somewhat the revenue intake while maintaining the favorable investment profile of the sector. It also discusses recent reforms to the oil and gas fiscal regime and future reform considerations, with attention to the attractiveness of investment on commercial terms—an issue that should be placed in the context of an overall reform of Pemex’s business strategy and possibly of the energy sector more generally.