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Mrs. Esther Perez Ruiz and Mauricio Soto
Raising living standards continues to be the main challenge facing Guatemala, as a matter of economic success and social cohesion. This paper discusses the spending, financing, and delivery capacity aspects of a viable development strategy for Guatemala couched within the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) agenda. Overall, Guatemala faces additional spending of about 8½ percent of GDP in 2030 to attain health, education, and roads, water, and sanitation infrastructure SDGs. While substantial, these cost estimates are commensurate with a well-defined financing strategy encompassing continuing tax administration efforts, broad-based tax reform, scaled-up private sector participation, and greater spending efficiency. Improving delivery capacities is also essential to secure access of those public goods to all Guatemalans, irrespective of their place of residence, ethnic group, or ability to pay.
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses key findings of the Second Review Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF) program for Sierra Leone. Performance under the IMF-supported program was mixed. Output growth was strong at 6.8 percent and broad-based, but key fiscal revenue and spending objectives were missed, and progress on the structural reform front was slow. The authorities’ program for 2008 aims to mobilize more domestic revenue; reorient public spending to infrastructure projects and poverty-reducing programs; prevent rapid accumulation of public debt; and accelerate implementation of structural reforms.
International Monetary Fund

This paper discusses key findings of the Second Review Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF) program for Sierra Leone. Performance under the IMF-supported program was mixed. Output growth was strong at 6.8 percent and broad-based, but key fiscal revenue and spending objectives were missed, and progress on the structural reform front was slow. The authorities’ program for 2008 aims to mobilize more domestic revenue; reorient public spending to infrastructure projects and poverty-reducing programs; prevent rapid accumulation of public debt; and accelerate implementation of structural reforms.

International Monetary Fund

This paper discusses key findings of the Second Review Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF) program for Sierra Leone. Performance under the IMF-supported program was mixed. Output growth was strong at 6.8 percent and broad-based, but key fiscal revenue and spending objectives were missed, and progress on the structural reform front was slow. The authorities’ program for 2008 aims to mobilize more domestic revenue; reorient public spending to infrastructure projects and poverty-reducing programs; prevent rapid accumulation of public debt; and accelerate implementation of structural reforms.

International Monetary Fund

This paper discusses key findings of the Second Review Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF) program for Sierra Leone. Performance under the IMF-supported program was mixed. Output growth was strong at 6.8 percent and broad-based, but key fiscal revenue and spending objectives were missed, and progress on the structural reform front was slow. The authorities’ program for 2008 aims to mobilize more domestic revenue; reorient public spending to infrastructure projects and poverty-reducing programs; prevent rapid accumulation of public debt; and accelerate implementation of structural reforms.

International Monetary Fund

This paper discusses key findings of the Second Review Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF) program for Sierra Leone. Performance under the IMF-supported program was mixed. Output growth was strong at 6.8 percent and broad-based, but key fiscal revenue and spending objectives were missed, and progress on the structural reform front was slow. The authorities’ program for 2008 aims to mobilize more domestic revenue; reorient public spending to infrastructure projects and poverty-reducing programs; prevent rapid accumulation of public debt; and accelerate implementation of structural reforms.