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The Spring-Summer 2019 issue of the IMF Research Perspectives explores how technology deals with old questions. Articles discuss the ways technological progress and the increased availability of data have helped in some areas, while presenting new challenges for analyzing various matters. The issue also includes an interview with Gita Gopinath, the new director of the IMF Research Department.

that I had no idea about. In hindsight that was a very risky move, but thankfully it turned out fne. Y: Chemistry, physics, biology—everything is related to mathematics, which is fundamental for studying economics . G : Yes. Thankfully I liked math the most. That was helpful. I liked how economics uses math to tackle social questions. Y: Are those areas related to your dream job when you were young? G : I don’t think I had a dream job. It was basically the favor of the month. For some time, it was joining the Indian administrative service. A few years

Irma Boracic-Suman, Ahmed Hassan, Takumi Sato, and Alexa Clay

Chioma Nwasonye from southern Nigeria, who had been job hunting since her university graduation and had decided to attend graduate school in the meantime . Here are the latest developments in the lives of the four young people we interviewed . Finding a Dream Job in Bosnia Irma Boracic-Suman graduated from the Sarajevo University Law School in 2009. It took four years and 385 job applications before she found her dream job in March 2013. While Boracic-Suman, 28, is happy at her new job at the Sarajevo municipal court, she said she knows that many other young

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
This chapter discusses the impact of global recession on the working population and looks at the future of work in the global economy from a variety of angles. IMF economist Prakash Loungani leads off with an overview of the global jobs landscape and examines the reasons behind the slow recovery of jobs in the wake of the global financial crisis. The chapter also highlights an argument for a jobs- and wage-led global recovery, while IMF researchers probe the relationship between declining trade union membership and inequality.