Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 95 items for :

  • "cultivable land" x
Clear All
Evangelos Ap. Eliades

THE NATURAL RESOURCES of Greece are still largely unexploited. The cultivable land is only one third of the total area, and the land actually cultivated is even less. Moreover, the soil is poor. Income per capita has been very low by European standards (equivalent to some US$80 per annum before the war); this factor and the relatively rapid population growth have been responsible both for widespread unemployment, open and concealed, and for emigration. The economy, despite a considerable industrial expansion during the interwar years, is still

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
This paper describes what the limits to growth are. The paper highlights that many critical variables in global society—particularly population and industrial production—have been growing at a constant percentage rate so that, by now, the absolute increase each year is extremely large. Such increases will become increasingly unmanageable unless deliberate action is taken to prevent such exponential growth. The paper also underscores that physical resources—particularly cultivable land and nonrenewable minerals—and the earth’s capacity to “absorb” pollution are finite.
Robert O. Blake

inputs (pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers) may be too expensive, unavailable, and, in the case of misused pesticides, dangerous for the farmers in developing countries. Yet, much of the increased world food production must come from these farmers. Very little additional irrigated land can be brought into production, barely making up for the cultivable land being lost to salinity and waterlogging. Too many national agricultural research and extension systems in the developing world have become underfunded, overly politicized, and hence, ineffective, over the

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper describes what the limits to growth are. The paper highlights that many critical variables in global society—particularly population and industrial production—have been growing at a constant percentage rate so that, by now, the absolute increase each year is extremely large. Such increases will become increasingly unmanageable unless deliberate action is taken to prevent such exponential growth. The paper also underscores that physical resources—particularly cultivable land and nonrenewable minerals—and the earth’s capacity to “absorb” pollution are finite.

Peter F. Gourley and Mr. Patrick Honohan

This paper describes what the limits to growth are. The paper highlights that many critical variables in global society—particularly population and industrial production—have been growing at a constant percentage rate so that, by now, the absolute increase each year is extremely large. Such increases will become increasingly unmanageable unless deliberate action is taken to prevent such exponential growth. The paper also underscores that physical resources—particularly cultivable land and nonrenewable minerals—and the earth’s capacity to “absorb” pollution are finite.