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International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Abstract

The future of finance, and in particular saving it from a popular backlash against the global financial crisis and related crisis management policies, has become a matter of great concern. In this brochure, which presents in written form a lecture from the Per Jacobsson Foundation’s lecture series, former Reserve Bank of India Governor Y. V. Reddy explores three interrelated issues of particular concern to central bankers in the search for good finance for the future: how to ensure that the financial sector serves the society better, how to integrate financial sector policies better with national economic policies, and how to ensure that the financial industry functions as a means and not as an end in itself. The question-and-answer session following the lecture is also included in the brochure.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Since the grave disruption of the subprime market at the start of the global financial crisis triggered major turbulences in the functioning of money markets in all large advanced economies, central bankers have experienced extraordinarily demanding and difficult times, characterized by a succession of shocks unseen, in the advanced economies, since World War II. Given the structurally very different economies that central banks were dealing with, one could have expected that the shock of the crisis would have accentuated their differences and given rise to an even more diverse setof central bank policies, conceptual references, and measures in a selfish, inward-looking mode. Instead, however, a phenomenon of “practical and conceptual rapprochement” took place between central banks, amidst the economic and financial turmoil, with the closest central bank cooperation ever, as symbolically illustrated by the coordinated decrease of interest rates in October 2008. The crisis also started or accelerated a multidimensional process of convergence of key elements of monetary policy thinking and policymaking—“conceptual convergence”—that is far from being achieved, but calls for great attention from both academia and policymakers. This Per Jacobsson Lecture concentrates on this convergence process, reflecting as well on some theoretical and practical issues that are associated with unconventional monetary policy liquidity and quantitative measures and the forward guidance generalization, themselves part of the conceptual convergence phenomenon.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Abstract

The future of finance, and in particular saving it from a popular backlash against the global financial crisis and related crisis management policies, has become a matter of great concern. In this brochure, which presents in written form a lecture from the Per Jacobsson Foundation’s lecture series, former Reserve Bank of India Governor Y. V. Reddy explores three interrelated issues of particular concern to central bankers in the search for good finance for the future: how to ensure that the financial sector serves the society better, how to integrate financial sector policies better with national economic policies, and how to ensure that the financial industry functions as a means and not as an end in itself. The question-and-answer session following the lecture is also included in the brochure.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Abstract

Dr. Yaga Venugopal Reddy was Governor, Reserve Bank of India, from 2003 to 2008. Subsequently, he was a member of the UN Commission of Experts to the President of the UN General Assembly on Reforms of the International Monetary and Financial System. Dr. Reddy was also a member of an informal international group of prominent persons on international monetary reforms (Palais Royal Initiative). He is Professor Emeritus at the University of Hyderabad and Distinguished Professor at the Indian Institute for Technology (IIT) Madras, as well as an honorary fellow of the London School of Economics and Political Science, and is on the Advisory Board of the Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET).

Y. V. Reddy

Abstract

I am grateful to the Per Jacobsson Foundation, in particular Chairman Ortiz, for conferring on me the honor of delivering the Per Jacobsson Foundation Lecture for 2012. I did not have the good fortune to meet Per Jacobsson, so my familiarity with him is primarily through the references made to him in the second volume of the history of the Reserve Bank of India. He came across as a forceful personality, who had an excellent grasp of India’s economic policies and problems.1 He was obviously a forthright person with impressive foresight. I am wondering what Per Jacobsson would say if he were to comment on recent developments in the financial sector.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Abstract

JAIME CARUANA: Welcome all of you to the BIS on the occasion of the Per Jacobsson Lecture. And it is a particular pleasure to welcome Dr. Reddy back to Basel, where he has so many friends. As you know, Dr. Reddy has a long record dedicated to public service. As a senior official in the Ministry of Finance he took a leading part in the liberalization of the Indian economy that began in the early 1990s. And in later years as Governor of the Reserve Bank, he did much to ensure that the Indian banks avoided these precrisis excesses. And therefore, he knows very well from personal experience how difficult it is to constrain this process, and he showed really great fortitude during this difficult period and under heavy pressure. So after the excellent Per Jacobsson Lecture last year with Andrew Crockett, I think this year we have also an excellent panelist, an excellent presenter.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Abstract

The Per Jacobsson Lectures are available on the Internet at www.perjacobsson.org, which also contains further information on the Foundation. Copies of the Per Jacobsson Lectures may be acquired without charge from the Secretary. Unless otherwise indicated, the lectures were delivered in Washington, D.C.