Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 39 items for :

  • "EEC Treaty" x
Clear All
JEAN-VICTOR LOUIS

I. Introduction: The General Context The realization of a global banking market is one of the elements of the program provided by the oft-cited White Paper entitled Completing the Internal Market , adopted in 1985 by the European Council and confirmed by the conference that negotiated the Single European Act of 1986 (SEA). As is well known, the SEA includes a revision of the EEC Treaty. This revision appears modest in its content, at least as compared with the draft European Union Treaty prepared by the European Parliament in 1984. But it has proved to be

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

established the European Economic Community and the European Atomic Energy Community. The Rome and Paris Treaties together form the constitution of the European Community. The immediate objectives of the EEC Treaty were the establishment of a customs union (with a common external tariff, in due course) with free movement of goods between Member States, the dismantling of quotas and barriers to trade, and the free movement of persons, services, and capital among the members of the Community. The Treaty also provided for common policies on economic matters (e

International Monetary Fund

agreed in principle to form a common market, which envisaged the free movement of goods, services, labor, and capital—the “four freedoms.” The founding document of the European Economic Community (EEC)—the EEC Treaty, signed in March 1957—embodied a vision for broadly based economic integration going well beyond simple cooperation on trade issues. Talks on a larger Western European free trade zone—instigated by the United Kingdom—failed in 1958, partly because of British insistence on preferential treatment of its Commonwealth ties and its special relationship with

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
This paper examines the trade and pricing policies in world agriculture. In the United States, the government pays farmers not to grow cereals and in the European Community, farmers are paid to grow more. Many have raised nominal producer prices but followed macroeconomic and exchange rate policies that left real producer prices unchanged or lower than before. Many have set up complex systems of producer taxation, and then established equally complex and frequently ineffectual systems of subsidies for inputs to offset that taxation.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
David Bock and Constantine Michalopoulos

This paper examines the trade and pricing policies in world agriculture. In the United States, the government pays farmers not to grow cereals and in the European Community, farmers are paid to grow more. Many have raised nominal producer prices but followed macroeconomic and exchange rate policies that left real producer prices unchanged or lower than before. Many have set up complex systems of producer taxation, and then established equally complex and frequently ineffectual systems of subsidies for inputs to offset that taxation.

Mohsin S. Khan and and Mr. Abbas Mirakhor

This paper examines the trade and pricing policies in world agriculture. In the United States, the government pays farmers not to grow cereals and in the European Community, farmers are paid to grow more. Many have raised nominal producer prices but followed macroeconomic and exchange rate policies that left real producer prices unchanged or lower than before. Many have set up complex systems of producer taxation, and then established equally complex and frequently ineffectual systems of subsidies for inputs to offset that taxation.

Alan Armstrong-Wright

This paper examines the trade and pricing policies in world agriculture. In the United States, the government pays farmers not to grow cereals and in the European Community, farmers are paid to grow more. Many have raised nominal producer prices but followed macroeconomic and exchange rate policies that left real producer prices unchanged or lower than before. Many have set up complex systems of producer taxation, and then established equally complex and frequently ineffectual systems of subsidies for inputs to offset that taxation.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper examines the trade and pricing policies in world agriculture. In the United States, the government pays farmers not to grow cereals and in the European Community, farmers are paid to grow more. Many have raised nominal producer prices but followed macroeconomic and exchange rate policies that left real producer prices unchanged or lower than before. Many have set up complex systems of producer taxation, and then established equally complex and frequently ineffectual systems of subsidies for inputs to offset that taxation.

Shinji Takagi

This paper examines the trade and pricing policies in world agriculture. In the United States, the government pays farmers not to grow cereals and in the European Community, farmers are paid to grow more. Many have raised nominal producer prices but followed macroeconomic and exchange rate policies that left real producer prices unchanged or lower than before. Many have set up complex systems of producer taxation, and then established equally complex and frequently ineffectual systems of subsidies for inputs to offset that taxation.