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Mr. Michael Sarel

Authors of Working Papers are normally staff members of the Fund or consultants, although on occasion outside authors may collaborate with a staff member in writing a paper. The views expressed in the Working Papers or their summaries are, however, those of the authors and should not necessarily be interpreted as representing the views of the Fund. Copies of individual Working Papers and information on subscriptions to the annual series of Working Papers may be obtained from IMF Publication Services, International Monetary Fund, 700 19th Street, Washington, D.C. 20431. Telephone: (202) 623-7430 Telefax: (202) 623-7201 This compilation of summaries of Working Papers released during July-December 1994 is being issued as a part of the Working Paper series. It is designed to provide the reader with an overview of the research work performed by the staff during the period.

International Monetary Fund
The purpose of the monitoring and evaluation process is to determine to what extent proposed actions/sub-actions have been accomplished, and to take policy corrective action to accomplish the objectives of the National Development Strategy. Monitoring and evaluation is done on the basis of process and performance indicators. The monitoring process will generate progress reports and will be reported at sixth-month intervals. A report on the evaluation of the National Development Strategy will be prepared at the end of each year of implementation.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper discusses origins of recent estimates of capital requirements for development and highlights some of the issues involved. The paper highlights that there are two possible approaches to making estimates of capital requirements for development. Both approaches are based on the idea that increased income and wealth depend fundamentally upon the application of more capital, either to increase output directly when used in combination with local resources, or indirectly when the use of such capital will lead to a more effective use of other resources.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper analyzes how increasing population will impact the lives of people in the world in 2000. It underscores that in 2000, there will be more people, many living in crowded towns, suffering from even greater difficulties of transport and urban sprawl, both upward and outward. The provision of satisfactory housing for the mass of the population will be difficult, because, without subsidy, its construction would demand rentals equal at least to the occupant’s annual income, while to subsidize so many tenants would be impossible.