Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 71 items for :

  • Keyword: deposit guarantee x
  • Annual Report on Exchange Arrangements and Exchange Restrictions x
Clear All Modify Search
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Abstract

Annual Report on Exchange Arrangements and Exchange Restrictions 1953

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The Annual Report on Exchange Arrangements and Exchange Restrictions has been published by the IMF since 1950. It draws on information available to the IMF from a number of sources, including that provided in the course of official staff visits to member countries, and has been prepared in close consultation with national authorities.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Abstract

Annual Report on Exchange Arrangements and Exchange Restrictions 1950

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Abstract

Annual Report on Exchange Arrangements and Exchange Restrictions 1964

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Abstract

Annual Report on Exchange Arrangements and Exchange Restrictions 1956

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Abstract

Annual Report on Exchange Arrangements and Exchange Restrictions 1962

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Abstract

This paper analyses relatively little overall progress in the formal relaxation of restrictions. Certainly, progress in this respect was much less than in the immediately preceding years. On the other hand, there was a significant strengthening of most internationally traded currencies, particularly in the opening months of 1958. The rates in free markets began to approximate the rates in official markets. In this respect, there was continued progress toward what is commonly called external convertibility, although the present position still falls short of formal external convertibility. In some countries, restrictions were relaxed to only a limited extent, partly because earlier relaxations had left only restrictions of a protective nature and partly because of the more complex nature of the economic trends which characterized the period. In the light of these trends and, more particularly, of the currency speculation which arose during the middle of the period, it is notable that most countries were able to defend the progress toward freer trade and payments which had been made earlier.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The Annual Report on Exchange Arrangements and Exchange Restrictions has been published by the IMF since 1950. It draws on information available to the IMF from a number of sources, including that provided in the course of official staff visits to member countries, and has been prepared in close consultation with national authorities.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Abstract

This paper discusses that total world trade rose significantly, particularly because of sustained European demand. With some exceptions, prices of basic products fell during the period. In this economic environment, developments in exchange markets became of focal interest to the IMF. The cumulative effect during recent years of relaxing surrender requirements and restrictions on payments has been very largely to restore to exchange markets their traditional function of reflecting the trend of international financial pressures. The difficulties that several countries faced in coordinating their internal and external monetary policies accentuated the international movements of short-term funds which had become increasingly important in preceding years. In particular, the Federal Republic of Germany and Switzerland received large amounts of foreign funds. Some countries continued to reduce their restrictions, particularly in the direction of simplifying exchange systems and liberalizing imports. These moves made a contribution toward sustaining the volume of world trade.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Abstract

This paper outlines the changes that took place in restrictive systems were largely a reflection of shifts in the balance of payments positions and outlook of member countries. The country surveys show that these changes were numerous. Several countries, including the United Kingdom and the United States, took steps to moderate capital outflows. The range of restrictive devices applied by some countries appears to have widened in recent years. The use of advance import deposit requirements has spread, and more countries are applying surcharges to imports when in balance of payments difficulties. In contrast, a number of member countries whose restrictive systems have been progressively liberalized in recent years have relied on internal measures to meet temporary balance of payments difficulties rather than resort to restrictions. By making use of the IMF’s resources several member countries have been able to maintain or extend their liberalization policies.