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International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept

Tuvalu is a fragile micro state. The country's remoteness, narrow production base, and weak banking sector constrain private sector activity.

International Monetary Fund
This paper shows how the internal job market for participants in the IMF Economist Program (EPs) could be redesigned to eliminate most of the shortcomings of the current system. The new design is based on Gale and Shapley's (1962) Deferred Acceptance Algorithm (DAA) and generates an efficient and stable outcome. An Excel-based computer program, EPMatch, implements the algorithm and applies it to the internal job market for EPs. The program can be downloaded from http://www.people.hbs.edu/gbarron/EPMatch_ for_Excel.html
International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept

Tuvalu is a fragile micro-state facing tremendous challenges from its remoteness, lack of scale economies, weak institutional capacity, and above all, climate change, which threatens the country's very existence. Thanks to buoyant fishing licensing fees and grants, Tuvalu has accumulated fiscal buffers in recent years, but it is now incurring significant costs rebuilding after the devastating Cyclone Pam in March 2015. Looking ahead, Tuvalu faces substantial long-run costs in improving its infrastructure to mitigate the effects of climate change.

International Monetary Fund
In March 2009, the Fund established a new Framework Administered Account to administer external financial resources for selected Fund Activities (the “SFA Instrument”). The financing of activities under the terms of the SFA Instrument is implemented through the establishment and operation of a subaccount within the SFA. This paper requests Executive Board approval to establish the United States Subaccount for Selected Fund Activities (the “Subaccount”) under the terms of the SFA instrument.
International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept

Tuvalu is one of the smallest and most isolated countries in the world. With a population of some 11,000 people living on 26 square kilometers, Tuvalu is more than 3,000 kilometers away from its nearest major external market (New Zealand). The country faces tremendous challenges stemming from its remoteness, lack of scale economies, weak institutional capacity, and, above all, climate change and rising sea levels, which threaten the country’s very existence. (Appendix III)

International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept

Tuvalu is one of the smallest and most isolated countries in the world. With a population of some 11,000 people living on 26 square kilometers, Tuvalu is more than 3,000 kilometers away from its nearest major external market (New Zealand). The country faces tremendous challenges stemming from its remoteness, lack of scale economies, weak institutional capacity, and, above all, climate change and rising sea levels, which threaten the country’s very existence. (Appendix III)

International Monetary Fund

This paper discusses Tuvalu’s economic condition, internal happenings, external linkages, and climate. The country has reported slow economic growth after the global crisis. The export and economic expansions have been minimal with many of its goods imported. The main source of income for the country continue to be remittances from its citizens working abroad and donor assistance. The government has laid out a rigid agenda for improving fiscal strength, literacy rate, power, health, and reducing nonpriority expenditure. The authorities believe that these challenges have given a fighting spirit to the country.

International Monetary Fund

Recent economic developments of Tuvalu were discussed. Major construction projects to build a wharf and a power station have been completed, and seafarer employment—Tuvalu’s main foreign exchange earning source for the private sector—is weak. The Consolidated Investment Fund (CIF) available for budget financing will be depleted. Freezing wages and reducing travel costs will also be important. Improvements in the banking sector and credit culture will help to support private-sector development. Executive Directors agreed to ensure fiscal sustainability.

International Monetary Fund

This paper discusses Tuvalu’s economic condition, internal happenings, external linkages, and climate. The country has reported slow economic growth after the global crisis. The export and economic expansions have been minimal with many of its goods imported. The main source of income for the country continue to be remittances from its citizens working abroad and donor assistance. The government has laid out a rigid agenda for improving fiscal strength, literacy rate, power, health, and reducing nonpriority expenditure. The authorities believe that these challenges have given a fighting spirit to the country.

International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept

Tuvalu is a fragile micro-state facing tremendous challenges from its remoteness, lack of scale economies, weak institutional capacity, and above all, climate change, which threatens the country's very existence. Thanks to buoyant fishing licensing fees and grants, Tuvalu has accumulated fiscal buffers in recent years, but it is now incurring significant costs rebuilding after the devastating Cyclone Pam in March 2015. Looking ahead, Tuvalu faces substantial long-run costs in improving its infrastructure to mitigate the effects of climate change.