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Antu Panini Murshid and Mr. Ashoka Mody
Recent commentary has downplayed the growth dividend from international financial integration, highlighting the possibly negative correlation between capital inflows and long-run growth. This paper presents new evidence consistent with standard economic theory and a more benign interpretation of cross-border private capital flows. The key observation is that a country’s growth volatility changes over time. With volatility below a threshold, an inflow of foreign capital has promoted growth. However, during periods of volatile growth, more flows have been associated with slower growth. Volatility levels and changes reflect an interaction of domestic production and institutional structures with global factors.
International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.
This Technical Assistance Report on Suriname constitutes technical advice provided by the staff of the IMF to the authorities of Suriname in response to their request for technical assistance. The mission discussed issues concerning the consumer price index (CPI), the producer price index (PPI) and export price index (XPI). On the CPI, the mission reviewed current practices and provided some recommendations. The main recommendations are to switch from a Dutot to a Jevons index on the elementary aggregate level and to start publishing the CPI according to the Classification of Individual Consumption according to Purpose on a class level provided the number of items permits. On the planned PPI and XPI, the discussion focused on available data sources and next steps for developing a PPI for Suriname. Reliable price statistics are essential for informed economic policymaking by the authorities. They also provide the private sector, foreign investors, rating agencies, and the public in general with important inputs in their decision-making, while informing both domestic economic policy and IMF surveillance.
International Monetary Fund

This 2004 Article IV Consultation highlights that tighter fiscal and monetary policies in Suriname helped stabilize the exchange rate and moderate inflation pressures in 2003 and 2004. The fiscal deficit narrowed from 6.5 percent of GDP in 2002 to near balance in 2003, while a tighter monetary policy helped to reduce inflation from 28 percent in 2002 to 13 percent in 2003. The financial system has become increasingly dollarized in recent years, reflecting the lingering effects on confidence of earlier episodes of price instability, as well as regulatory changes favoring foreign currency intermediation.

International Monetary Fund

In this paper, the economic growth of Suriname is discussed. The fiscal deficit shifted from 2.2 percent to 3.3 percent of GDP during 2009–10. In 2010, CLICO-Suriname was acquired by a local insurance company. The need to rein in current expenditure and avoid development of wage–price inflation and strengthen the social support programs are stressed by the authorities. The introduction of VAT and other systems are discussed. Finally, improvement over the business environment to facilitate the development of the private sector and global economy was encouraged.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

This 2013 Article IV Consultation highlights that Suriname’s macroeconomic performance has strengthened markedly over the past decade. Since 2000, stronger policies and buoyant commodity prices, supported by political stability, have helped improve macroeconomic performance, enabling Suriname to enjoy several recent upgrades from major ratings agencies. With gold prices declining after a long upswing, the main challenges are to strengthen institutions and adjust policies to avoid the onset of a boom–bust cycle. Growth remains robust although inflation has declined considerably. In 2012 GDP grew an estimated 4.75 percent, similar to 2011 and among the highest in the region, supported by buoyant commodity prices, particularly gold.

International Monetary Fund

In this paper, the economic growth of Suriname is discussed. The fiscal deficit shifted from 2.2 percent to 3.3 percent of GDP during 2009–10. In 2010, CLICO-Suriname was acquired by a local insurance company. The need to rein in current expenditure and avoid development of wage–price inflation and strengthen the social support programs are stressed by the authorities. The introduction of VAT and other systems are discussed. Finally, improvement over the business environment to facilitate the development of the private sector and global economy was encouraged.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

This 2013 Article IV Consultation highlights that Suriname’s macroeconomic performance has strengthened markedly over the past decade. Since 2000, stronger policies and buoyant commodity prices, supported by political stability, have helped improve macroeconomic performance, enabling Suriname to enjoy several recent upgrades from major ratings agencies. With gold prices declining after a long upswing, the main challenges are to strengthen institutions and adjust policies to avoid the onset of a boom–bust cycle. Growth remains robust although inflation has declined considerably. In 2012 GDP grew an estimated 4.75 percent, similar to 2011 and among the highest in the region, supported by buoyant commodity prices, particularly gold.