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International Monetary Fund
This Technical Note presents a targeted review and a follow-up on the implementation of the recommendations of the 2002 assessment of Lithuania’s compliance with the Basel Core Principles for Effective Banking Supervision. It was found that banking supervision arrangements in Lithuania were of a high standard and either fully or largely complied with the Core Principles. On one Core Principle, Lithuania was judged to be noncompliant at that time, which concerned the lack of explicit legal protection for Bank of Lithuania board members and supervisory staff.
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This paper discusses findings of the Detailed Assessment of Observance of the Basel Core Principles (BCP) for Effective Banking Supervision in Romania. The supervisory approach of the National Bank of Romania (NBR) has been changing toward a more risk based approach since the previous BCP assessment, but more needs to be done. Further development of the NBR’s supervisory approach will make supervision more effective and in line with the requirements of the 2012 BCP. The NBR may need to devote more supervisory attention to banks’ risk models and building up further expertise in specialized areas such as information technology and market risk. In the area of corrective actions and sanctions, the NBR should review its framework to ensure it is protected from undue legal challenges.
Miss Eva Gutierrez
This paper argues that the governance framework of cooperative banks may hamper raising capital, particularly at time of distress, complicating the bank resolution process ?specially for large banks?and may not provide adequate incentives to control banks' management. Reforms should preserve the positive characteristics that make cooperative banks a valuable addition to the Italian financial system, while providing enough flexibility and incentives for banks to adopt a suitable governance model. Our empirical analysis suggests that cooperative banks may enjoy a higher degree of monopoly power than commercial banks. Thus, regulations and the enforcement of antitrust policies should ensure a leveled playing field.
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses key findings of the Detailed Assessment of Basel Core Principles (BCPs) for Effective Banking Supervision on the Republic of Serbia. The assessment reveals that Serbia has made considerable progress toward enhanced compliance with the BCPs and with international standards. A major overhaul of the legal framework—the enactment of the new laws on banks in 2005 and the issuance of new regulations—has provided the basis for this improvement, which are reflected in upgraded scores for a considerable number of BCPs.
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This paper presents an assessment of compliance with the Basel Core Principles for Effective Banking Supervision in El Salvador. The regulatory authority Superintendencia del Sistema Financiero (SSF) has taken a number of initiatives to strengthen and upgrade supervision. This includes, among others, a risk unit with specialized expertise and continued efforts to foster cross-border cooperation and coordination. Despite considerable efforts, for the SSF is commended for its efforts, the lack of regulation in practically all risk categories is a major impediment to further progress. The lack of standards in those areas, combined with severe shortcomings in legal protection and deficiencies in the remedial action framework for addressing minor transgressions, limits the SSF’s ability to address imprudent behavior by banks.
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This Technical Assistance Report discusses the main findings and recommendations made by the IMF Mission regarding the development of risk-based supervision (RBS) in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic. Over the past few months, the Bank of Lao has made great strides in preparing for implementation of risk-based supervision of banks. A new supervisory manual reflecting key principles of risk-based approach to supervision has been drafted. The new draft template of the Report of Onsite Examination is broadly in line with the past technical assistance recommendations. Some improvements could support the analysis of trends over longer periods of time, and emphasize exceptions to prudential and/or regulatory norms. Planning an onsite examination using new RBS methods is a logical next step.
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This Technical Assistance report on the Lao People’s Democratic Republic provides advice toward implementing risk-based supervision (RBS). Special attention needs to be given to expediting the formal approval of the RBS manual and fully implementing RBS methods in practice. Although this could be delayed due to other supervisory priorities, it is considered essential as the quality of supervision is improved by the practical application of RBS tools and learning-by-doing. The root causes of risks should be better identified, and greater attention should be paid to well-reasoned analysis of risks and the accompanied supervisory action. In addition, the mission advised additional modification of these documents to enhance its usefulness and quality. With respect to foreign-branch supervision, special consideration should be given to the extent of adequate oversight by the branch head office, supervision by the home supervisor, and overall financial condition of the foreign banking group. The mission provided examples of qualitative criteria for foreign-branch rating.
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This paper presents an assessment of the level of observance of the Basel Core Principles for Effective Banking Supervision (BCPs) in China. The China Banking Regulatory Commission (CBRC) has maintained its momentum in regulation and supervision in the face of exceptional growth in scale and increasing complexity of the banking system. The CBRC has also achieved a high degree of compliance with the BCPs. However, several dimensions of credit risk, including treatment of problem assets, concentration risk and related party exposures have aspects in which they lag international best practices and standards. Failure to resolve these issues may hamper the CBRC in its task of assessing the nature and scale of credit risk in the system and within individual institutions.