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International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

Abstract

The global economy is emerging from recession, but the recovery is expected to be sluggish. While financial conditions have continued to improve, many markets remain highly dependent on public support, and downside risks prevail. In the United States and many advanced economies, growth and employment will remain weak in coming years. In turn, Canada has shown comparative resilience despite sizable shocks. A permanent loss in potential output, weak private consumption, and much higher debt levels in the United States will be negative legacies of the crisis that could adversely affect the Latin America and Caribbean region.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

Abstract

The LAC region is doing considerably better than in past crises, but there is growing heterogeneity within the region. External shocks to remittances and tourism are still playing out and will continue to affect countries in Central America and the Caribbean. In contrast, some of the larger economies have already bottomed out. These varying output dynamics, coupled with differing room for policy maneuver, are shaping policy challenges in the near term. In addition, long-lasting legacies from the global crisis will have significant implications for the region.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

Abstract

Although it has faced larger external shocks this time, the Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) region has fared noticeably better than in the earlier three global downturns since the 1980s. It has also fared better than other emerging markets. This better performance can be attributed to stronger and more credible policy frameworks, which led to lower banking, external, and fiscal vulnerabilities and allowed some LAC countries to react with monetary or fiscal policy easing.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

Abstract

The global crisis put fiscal policymaking at the forefront, highlighting differences in policy frameworks and preparedness within the region. Countries' circumstances prior to the crisis, largely reflecting past fiscal behavior, shaped the varied fiscal policy responses that Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) governments have recently taken. The experience of 2009 confirms that some LAC governments do have “space” to support economic activity during a major downturn. But the experience also draws attention to limits on such space, as well as the need for fiscal policymaking and frameworks to evolve—to be prepared for future shocks.

Ms. Dora M Iakova, Mr. Luis M. Cubeddu, Gustavo Adler, and Mr. Sebastian Sosa

Abstract

En los últimos 15 años, los países de América Latina realizaron enormes avances en el fortalecimiento de sus economías y la mejora de las condiciones de vida. Si bien el producto cayó temporalmente durante la crisis financiera mundial, la mayoría de las economías registraron una rápida recuperación. Sin embargo, la actividad económica en toda la región se ha estado enfriando y la región se enfrenta a un período de desafíos crecientes. Este libro argumenta que América Latina puede estar a la altura de estos desafíos, y las autoridades de la región ya están implementando reformas en educación, energía y otros sectores. Pero es necesario, y posible, profundizar la búsqueda de mejores condiciones de vida para los habitantes de América Latina.

International Monetary Fund

This Selected Issues paper on Chile assesses the long-term outlook of Chile’s private pension system. The paper provides an overview of Chile’s recent experience with public–private partnerships (PPPs), focusing on the design of its institutional framework. The paper discusses that Chile’s experience with PPPs, currently covering 44 projects, has been successful. It also analyzes bank profitability and competition in Chile from an international perspective. It also compares Chile’s external private debt across industrial and emerging market economies and analyzes implications for external vulnerability.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
Colombia’s very strong track record of macroeconomic policy management, underpinned by robust fiscal and monetary policy frameworks, has reduced vulnerabilities in recent years and helped weather the global financial crisis. The authorities’ policy focus has shifted from supporting the recovery through appropriate countercyclical measures to rebuilding policy buffers through fiscal consolidation, the normalization of monetary policy, and a strengthening of the reserve position.
International Monetary Fund
In this study, economic developments of India are discussed. Growth is among the fastest-growing in the world, social indicators are improving, and medium-term economic prospects are favorable. The Reserve Bank of India’s (RBI) efforts are used to tighten monetary conditions. The measures taken to increase the availability of long-term finance for infrastructure, especially, are helping to develop the corporate bond market. Executive Directors commended the introduction of the RBI’s financial stability report, the review of financial laws, and the creation of financial stability and development council.
International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.
The Mundell-Fleming model of international macroeconomic originated in the early 1960s and has been extended during the ensuing quarter century. This paper develops an exposition that integrates the various facets of the model and incorporates its extensions into a unified analytical framework. Attention is given to (1) the distinction between short-run and long-run effects of policies, (2) the implications of debt and tax financing of government expenditures, and (3) the role of the exchange rate regime in this regard. By identifying the key mechanisms operating in the model, the exposition clarifies the model’s limitations and facilitates comparison with other, more current approaches.
Mr. R. G Gelos, Mr. Guido M Sandleris, and Ms. Ratna Sahay
What determines the ability of governments from developing countries to access international credit markets? We examine this question using detailed data on sovereign bond issuances and public syndicated bank loans since 1982. We find that traditional measures of a country’s links with the rest of the world (such as trade openness) and traditional liquidity and macroeconomic indicators do not help much in explaining market access. However, a country’s vulnerability to shocks and the perceived quality of its policies and institutions appear to be important determinants of its government’s ability to tap the markets. We are unable to detect strong punishment of defaulting countries by credit markets.