Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 32 items for :

  • Economic sectors x
  • Real sector x
  • Agricultural Policy; Food Policy x
Clear All
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

04/235: IMF Managing Director Rodrigo de Rato’s Statement at the Conclusion of His Visit to Mexico, November 9

Barbara Herz

For the latest thinking about the international financial system, monetary policy, economic development, poverty reduction, and other critical issues, subscribe to Finance & Development (F&D). This lively quarterly magazine brings you in-depth analyses of these and other subjects by the IMF’s own staff as well as by prominent international experts. Articles are written for lay readers who want to enrich their understanding of the workings of the global economy and the policies and activities of the IMF.

Mr. Hans O. Schmitt

The author outlines the main issues involved in negotiating British accession to the European economic Community.

Mr. Sanjeev Gupta, Mr. Leslie Lipschitz, and Mr. Thomas H. Mayer

For the latest thinking about the international financial system, monetary policy, economic development, poverty reduction, and other critical issues, subscribe to Finance & Development (F&D). This lively quarterly magazine brings you in-depth analyses of these and other subjects by the IMF’s own staff as well as by prominent international experts. Articles are written for lay readers who want to enrich their understanding of the workings of the global economy and the policies and activities of the IMF.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This chapter discusses principles and consequences of the common agricultural policy (CAP) of the European Community (EC). It shows that agricultural pricing policies aimed at supporting farm incomes were already in place in EC member countries before the inception of the CAP; indeed, in the presence of these policies, the CAP was a logical consequence of the extension of the common market to the agricultural sector. Thus, the flaws of the CAP can be traced back to national policies and attitudes toward agriculture. Recognition of the burden of agricultural support on the rest of the economy, as well as the growing budgetary costs, has elicited a greater public interest in the CAP. Equally, the trade frictions caused by export subsidies have underlined the CAP's international implications. For these reasons, the member states appear more determined than hitherto to bring agricultural expenditure under control. Given the wider effects of the CAP both on EC economies and the international community, it is to be hoped that current efforts at reform will be successful.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This chapter discusses principles and consequences of the common agricultural policy (CAP) of the European Community (EC). It shows that agricultural pricing policies aimed at supporting farm incomes were already in place in EC member countries before the inception of the CAP; indeed, in the presence of these policies, the CAP was a logical consequence of the extension of the common market to the agricultural sector. Thus, the flaws of the CAP can be traced back to national policies and attitudes toward agriculture. Recognition of the burden of agricultural support on the rest of the economy, as well as the growing budgetary costs, has elicited a greater public interest in the CAP. Equally, the trade frictions caused by export subsidies have underlined the CAP's international implications. For these reasons, the member states appear more determined than hitherto to bring agricultural expenditure under control. Given the wider effects of the CAP both on EC economies and the international community, it is to be hoped that current efforts at reform will be successful.

M.M.M. van Gent

Agriculture is receiving increasing attention in economic development, and consulting services play an increasingly important part in its progress.

Mr. H. Vittas

THIS PAPER DISCUSSES in somewhat theoretical terms the probable primary effects of a change in the exchange rate of the currency of any country in the European Economic Community on the level of prices, production, and trade of agricultural commodities within the EEC, in the absence of official measures especially designed to prevent or mitigate such effects. 2 A distinction is drawn between de facto changes in the exchange rate that may arise when countries cease to observe the established limits around parity and de jure changes in the exchange rate when the official parity itself is altered. Discussion in the paper is further limited to cases where the currency of one or more of the EEC countries appreciates in terms of all other currencies. Such cases are of interest in view of the recent floating of several EEC currencies, resulting in an appreciation in relation to their official parity in terms of the common EEC unit of account.

KAREN BROOKS and ZVI LERMAN

THE CREATION of new farms on privately owned land holds the key to agricultural recovery in countries abandoning collectivized agriculture in favor of the market. The job to be done is mammoth, because the inherited collective farm is flawed as an organizational form for agriculture. Transfer of ownership must therefore be accompanied by farm restructuring, a process for which no well-tried formula exists.