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International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

(www.imf.org)

Mrs. Ruby Randall, Mr. Jorge Shepherd, Mr. Frits Van Beek, Mr. J. R. Rosales, and Ms. Mayra Rebecca Zermeno

Abstract

The Eastern Caribbean Central Bank is one of just a few regional central banks in the world and the only one where the member countries have pooled all their foreign reserves, the convertability of the common currency is fully self-supported, and the parity of the exchange rate has not changed. This occasional paper reviews recent developments, policy issues, and institutional arrangements in the member countries of the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union, and looks at the regional financial system, its supervision, and the central bank's initiatives to establish a single financial space. The paper includes a large amount of statistical information that is not readily available elsewhere from a single source.

International Monetary Fund

This paper presents key findings of the Second Review for Grenada under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF). Grenada’s economic outlook has deteriorated somewhat, mainly reflecting the global financial turmoil and slowing global growth. Financial turmoil and the global economic slowdown are expected to slow tourism demand, FDI, and remittances, and could also negatively affect grants from some donors. The authorities are moving forward with a policy framework that provides for needed fiscal consolidation, addresses financial sector vulnerabilities, and reinvigorates the structural agenda.

Mrs. Ruby Randall, Mr. Jorge Shepherd, Mr. Frits Van Beek, Mr. J. R. Rosales, and Ms. Mayra Rebecca Zermeno

Abstract

Eastern Caribbean countries institutionalized political and economic cooperation through the establishment of the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) with the Treaty of Basseterre in 1981. Two years later they set up the Eastern Caribbean Central Bank (ECCB), which replaced the Eastern Caribbean Currency Authority. The eight member countries and territories of the ECCB are Antigua and Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines, which are independent states and members of the IMF, and Anguilla and Montserrat, which are territories of the United Kingdom,1 The six independent OECS states and Montserrat are also members of the Caribbean Common Market, CARICOM, established in 1973.

Mrs. Ruby Randall, Mr. Jorge Shepherd, Mr. Frits Van Beek, Mr. J. R. Rosales, and Ms. Mayra Rebecca Zermeno

Abstract

The establishment of the Eastern Caribbean Central Bank (ECCB) in 1983 was the culmination of a long period of monetary cooperation dating back to 1950 when the British Caribbean Currency Board (BCCB) was created (Box 2). The BCCB, which functioned as a currency board proper and maintained a foreign exchange cover of 100 percent of the currency issue, was replaced by the Eastern Caribbean Currency Authority (ECCA) in 1965, when the Eastern Caribbean dollar (EC$) was introduced and pegged to the pound sterling at a rate of EC$4.80 = £1. Under the ECCA, the foreign exchange backing was set at 70 percent and then reduced to 60 percent in 1975. Following a series of depreciations of the pound, the Eastern Caribbean dollar was pegged to the U.S. dollar in July 1976 at the then prevailing market cross-rate of EC$2.70 per U.S. dollar. The parity has remained fixed at that level.

Mrs. Ruby Randall, Mr. Jorge Shepherd, Mr. Frits Van Beek, Mr. J. R. Rosales, and Ms. Mayra Rebecca Zermeno

Abstract

The goal of the money and capital markets development initiatives being sponsored by the ECCB is to create a “single financial space” within the Eastern Caribbean region. This is seen as the fulfillment of the objective set in Article 4. Section 3 of the ECCB Agreement requiring the Bank to “promote credit and exchange conditions and a sound financial structure conducive to … balanced growth and development.” The program seeks to achieve greater economies of scale in the region’s financial operations by integrating the regions’ financial markets. It also aims to broaden and deepen the financial markets and to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of the mobilization of domestic and foreign savings to foster economic growth.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

The arrangement was approved on June 26, 2014 and the fourth review completed on May 18, 2016. Disbursements equivalent to SDR 10.04 million (about US$14.3 million) have been made to Grenada so far under the arrangement and the equivalent of SDR 2 million (about US$2.9 million) will be made available upon Executive Board completion of the Fifth Review. Grenada's comprehensive public debt restructuring is nearing completion. Agreements implementing the 2015 Paris Club Agreed Minute were signed with two creditors and the authorities have reached agreement with a domestic bank holding T-bills and government-guaranteed debt. Overall program implementation remains solid. All quantitative performance criteria for the Fifth Review were met. There have been delays with some of the structural benchmarks, but corrective actions have been taken. The authorities advanced reforms to strengthen tax administration, improve public finance management, and strengthen the business environment.

International Monetary Fund

This 2009 Article IV Consultation highlights that economic activity in Grenada is slowing significantly, reflecting the drag of the global crisis on tourism receipts, foreign direct investment, and remittances. Commercial banks have remained resilient, but the intervention of the Trinidad and Tobago-based CL Financial Group has heightened financial uncertainty. All quantitative targets for end-June 2009 were met. Executive Directors have commended the Grenadian authorities for the satisfactory performance of their economic program under these highly challenging circumstances.

International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses key findings of the Third Review under the three-year arrangement for Grenada. All end-2008 quantitative targets were met. Meeting structural benchmarks on submitting investment legislation and a new Excise Bill and on completing a Country Poverty Assessment has been delayed owing to the time required to consult stakeholders, to finalize the list of excisable goods, and to complete the technical work and drafting, respectively. The performance criterion on initiating reorganization or liquidation of Capital Bank was met in November 2008.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This paper discusses Grenada’s Fifth Review Under the Extended Credit Facility (ECF), Request for Modification of Performance Criteria, and Financing Assurances review. Overall program implementation remains solid. All quantitative performance criteria for the Fifth Review were met. Some structural benchmarks have been delayed, but there has been corrective action. The authorities have advanced reforms to strengthen tax administration, improve public finance management, and bolster the business environment. The IMF staff supports the completion of the Fifth Review under the ECF arrangement.