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International Monetary Fund

This paper discusses Nicaragua’s 2005 Article IV Consultation and Seventh, Eighth, and Ninth Reviews Under the Three Year Arrangement Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF). The economy continued to perform well, notwithstanding pressure from higher oil prices. Strong performance under the program in 2003–04 allowed Nicaragua to reach the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries completion point in January 2004. Since then, growth has moderated toward 4.1 percent y/y in 2005. Key medium-term challenges include addressing vulnerabilities arising from weak balance sheets, reflected in high levels of debt and dollarization.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

This 2013 Article IV Consultation highlights that during the past two years, macroeconomic developments in Nicaragua have been generally favorable. Real GDP grew by an average of 5¼ percent during 2011–2012, and the annual average inflation was 7¼ percent during the same period. Looking ahead, the macroeconomic outlook also remains broadly positive. Real GDP is expected to grow by 4¼ percent in 2013 and then stabilize at its potential level of 4 percent over the medium-term. Inflation is projected to remain at about 7 percent supported by the crawling-peg exchange rate system that has helped anchor inflation expectations.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

Context. Commitment to macroeconomic stability has characterized government policies. Over the last three years, real GDP growth has averaged 4.8 percent, one of the highest in the region, while inflation has remained anchored by the exchange rate regime. The external current account deficit has declined, reflecting a smaller oil bill due to both lower oil prices and increased reliance on renewable energy sources. Outlook and Risks. A moderate deceleration in real growth is projected in 2015 followed by a small pickup in 2016, owing to the projected recovery in foreign demand and an increase in election-related spending. Poverty has fallen sharply but unemployment has edged up due in part to a decline in manufacturing activity. The fiscal stance has become modestly more expansionary and, as a result, public debt ratios are expected to stabilize in contrast with the reduction envisaged in previous consultations. Risks are, however, tilted to the downside. A deterioration in the financial terms or levels of the Venezuela oil cooperation could increase pressures to absorb quasi-fiscal spending into the budget. Structurally weak growth in key advanced and emerging economies and a persistent decline in prices of major export products would also negatively impact Nicaragua.

International Monetary Fund
This report assesses the Observance of Standards and Codes on the Fiscal Transparency Module for Nicaragua. Nicaragua has made notable progress in recent years in improving fiscal management and fiscal transparency. The public sector has been downsized and different branches and levels of government have been more clearly defined. The budget is providing more comprehensive information on the government’s fiscal activities in the framework of institutional, programmatic, and economic classifications. The implementation of a financial management information system and a treasury single account are providing timely and more reliable information on budget execution and borrowing.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This 2013 Article IV Consultation highlights that during the past two years, macroeconomic developments in Nicaragua have been generally favorable. Real GDP grew by an average of 5¼ percent during 2011–2012, and the annual average inflation was 7¼ percent during the same period. Looking ahead, the macroeconomic outlook also remains broadly positive. Real GDP is expected to grow by 4¼ percent in 2013 and then stabilize at its potential level of 4 percent over the medium-term. Inflation is projected to remain at about 7 percent supported by the crawling-peg exchange rate system that has helped anchor inflation expectations.
International Monetary Fund
This paper is a report of Nicaragua’s performance under the 2007–11 program. The period was marked by a stern financial crisis, price shocks, and disasters, but the program maintained the macroeconomic stability. Although the program had several hurdles, its achievements were remarkable—approval of tax reforms, improvements in banks' framework, power and electricity framework, dwindled poverty rate, and strong foreign relations. Overall, the Board is in high spirits in the triumph of the program in a critical situation though it had some flaws.
International Monetary Fund
This 2003 Article IV Consultation for Hungary highlights that developments in growth and inflation were broadly positive in 2002. Buoyed by domestic demand, real GDP growth increased to 3.5 percent (year-over-year) in the second half of 2002 from 3.0 percent in the first half. Headline inflation declined from its recent peak of 10.8 percent in May of 2001 to 4.8 percent at end-2002. The external current account deficit widened in 2002, although foreign direct investment fell off sharply.
International Monetary Fund
Nicaragua's economic performance in 2010 was satisfactory. Real GDP grew, supported by strong consumption and investment. Bank credit started recovering while the financial system remained liquid and profitable. Exchange-rate and monetary policy have contributed to macroeconomic stability. The authorities plan to improve public financial management and also to adopt a legal framework and remain committed to contain the macroeconomic risks from external aid flows. They also welcomed the sixth review and Financing Assurances under the Extended Credit Facility (ECF) arrangement.
International Monetary Fund
This paper examines Guatemala’s Request for a Stand-By Arrangement (SBA). The authorities are requesting a 12-month SBA in an amount equivalent to SDR 84 million (40 percent of quota) to support an economic program aimed at reducing the fiscal deficit and restructuring the financial system, while sustaining higher outlays on social and basic infrastructure as called for by the Peace Accords. The program assumes an acceleration of real GDP growth to 2.25 percent and a reduction in inflation to a 4–6 percent range.
International Monetary Fund
The Nicaraguan economy continued to post robust growth in the first half of 2011. The Seventh Review Under the Extended Credit Facility (ECF) and Financing Assurances Review highlights that all quantitative performance criteria for end-June 2011 were met and the structural agenda is broadly on track. The fiscal performance of the central government was stronger than envisaged. The deficit in the external current account is projected to remain large and to be financed by resilient capital flows.