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Mr. Mohsin S. Khan and Mr. Morris Goldstein

Abstract

One of the more important yet puzzling aspects of the recent global stagflation has been the rather surprising resiliency of growth rates of real income in non-oil developing countries during the 1973-80 period in the face of the marked slowdown of corresponding growth rates in the industrial world. The primary purpose of this paper is to shed some light on this phenomenon by examining the relationship between the rate of economic growth in the non-oil developing countries and that in the industrial countries over the past decade or so.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
This paper reviews the “significant impact” of World Bank lending for the rural poor. The paper highlights that a review of 130 World Bank lending operations has found that 94 percent of the total investments completed between 1976 and 1979 have appeared to achieve their major objectives or are well on their way to doing so. And the World Bank’s first projects for helping large numbers of poor small farmers have significantly improved farmers’ productivity and incomes. Most of the projects were launched in the 1970s.
Mr. Mohsin S. Khan and Mr. Morris Goldstein

Abstract

For the past hundred years the rate of growth of output in the developing world has depended on the rate of growth of output in the developed world. When the developed grow fast the developing grow fast, and when the developed slow down, the developing slow down. Is this linkage inevitable?1

Mr. Mohsin S. Khan and Mr. Morris Goldstein

Abstract

In this section we begin our investigation into how the rate of growth of real income in industrial countries affects the income growth rate in non-oil developing countries by considering the relationship between income growth in the former and export growth in the latter.

Mr. Mohsin S. Khan and Mr. Morris Goldstein

Abstract

This section focuses on the relationship between the export growth of non-oil developing countries and their economic growth rates. In brief, an attempt is made to identify the channels by which exports affect economic growth; whether the relationship between the two growth rates is rigid or subject to change; whether the relationship has strengthened or weakened over time; and how the relationship differs among the subgroups of non-oil developing countries.

International Monetary Fund
This report provides the IMF's projections and estimates on Thailand's expenditure on gross domestic product at current prices; balance of payments during 1995–2000; gross domestic product by industrial origin at current and constant prices during 1995–99; investment and savings at constant prices; gross domestic product at 1988 prices; selected energy prices; mining and agricultural productions during 1995–2001; central government fiscal accounts and revenue and grants; central government expenditure by economic classification,1995/96–1999/2000; summary of the central and local government tax system; financial and monetary surveys during 1996–2001, and so on.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
The Web edition of the IMF Survey is updated several times a week, and contains a wealth of articles about topical policy and economic issues in the news. Access the latest IMF research, read interviews, and listen to podcasts given by top IMF economists on important issues in the global economy. www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/survey/so/home.aspx
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

The Web edition of the IMF Survey is updated several times a week, and contains a wealth of articles about topical policy and economic issues in the news. Access the latest IMF research, read interviews, and listen to podcasts given by top IMF economists on important issues in the global economy. www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/survey/so/home.aspx

Mr. Mohsin S. Khan and Mr. Morris Goldstein

Abstract

This paper has examined the relationship between the rate of economic growth in the non-oil developing countries and that in industrial countries, with the intention of appraising the effects of slower industrial country growth on the non-oil developing countries during 1973—80. At the risk of oversimplifying the arguments and the evidence examined in the preceding sections, the principal conclusions emerging from our analysis can be summarized as follows: