Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 17 items for :

  • Financial Institutions and Services: General x
  • El Salvador x
Clear All
Mrs. Lynn Aylward

On November 4, Anne O. Krueger, professor of economics at Stanford University and Director of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, gave the Annual Ernest Sturc Memorial Lecture at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington, D.C. The webcast of the address, entitled “Whither the World Bank and the IMF in the Twenty-First Century?” is available on the SAIS website (www.sais-jhu.edu).

Mr. Prakash Loungani

Financial crises, particularly banking crises, have been common in recent years. While crises have occurred with somewhat greater frequency in developing and emerging market economies, industrial countries have not been spared either. Such crises impose significant costs on the economy. In the great majority of cases, for instance, banking crises are followed by recessions, with the cumulative loss in output sometimes running as high as 10 percent of GDP.

International Monetary Fund. Independent Evaluation Office

Abstract

The IMF’s surveillance framework encompasses a new focus on multilateral issues, and especially the spillovers from one economy onto others. This third Annual Report of the Independent Evaluation Office describes ongoing and recently completed evaluations and discusses additions to IEO’s work plan. General lessons pertaining to IMF surveillance emerging from recent evaluations are highlighted and discussed, namely the need for better integration of financial and macroeconomic factors as well as bilateral and multilateral policy analysis and policy prescriptions. The findings of an External Evaluation Panel charged with assessing the work of the IEO are also covered.

Mr. Jorge I Canales Kriljenko, Padamja Khandelwal, and Mr. Alexander Lehmann
We assess the current barriers to trade in financial services in the six Central American countries seeking a free trade agreement with the United States (the CAFTA) and examine the relative merits of regional and multilateral liberalization. Even though there are few formal barriers, deficiencies in regulatory and competition standards and in the judicial systems still restrict the participation of foreign institutions in the financial systems in the region. A greater presence of such institutions could support other objectives of trade and investment liberalization, though it would require several adjustments in prudential supervision at national levels and greater cooperation between members of the CAFTA.
International Monetary Fund
This paper examines Honduras’s 2005 Article IV Consultation and Second Review Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility. In the period 1960–2000, output growth in Honduras ranked among the lowest in the region. During the 1990s, when growth recovered in the rest of Central America, in Honduras it only kept pace with population growth. The authorities embarked on an economic reform program that focuses on ensuring macroeconomic stability and strengthening growth prospects through the development of human capital and basic infrastructure.
International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.
A Technical Assistance (TA) Mission from the Regional Technical Assistance Center for Central America, Panama, and the Dominican Republic, visited the city of San Salvador, El Salvador, on August 13–24, 2018, to provide TA to the Central Reserve Bank of El Salvador (BCRES) on compiling annual accounts by institutional sectors (AAIS) from 2014 onwards, as part of the data series from the base year of 2005. In March 2018, the BCRES published a dataset of quarterly and annual national accounts series by economic activity; a monthly volume indicator; backcasted series from 1990–2014; and Supply and Use Tables (SUT) from 2005 and 2014, with a base year of 2005. As part of the dataset to be prepared and disseminated in the new 2005 base year, the authorities requested TA to compile annual accounts focusing on institutional sectors starting in 2014.
International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.
This Technical Assistance report on El Salvador highlights analysis on the Monthly Volume Indicator of Economic Activity (IMVAE) and institutional sector accounts mission. The mission reviewed the process followed by the National Accounts Department team to consolidate the IMVAE and compile the economic activity indicators established in accordance with the recommendations of the previous mission carried out in September 2017. It found a very thorough analysis and review of the basic statistics available for measuring that indicator. Particularly noteworthy is the magnitude of the interinstitutional effort to provide new information gleaned from the results of the Monthly and Quarterly Economic Surveys, conducted by the Directorate General of Statistics and Censuses with Central Reserve Bank of El Salvador support. The mission suggested to continue to apply the methodology established for compiling and continuously updating the IMVAE, while constantly analyzing the consistency, quality, and timeliness of the calculation of the indicator and its alignment with quarterly data and ensuring that it is consistent with the concepts and guidelines underlying Quarterly National Accounts aggregates.
International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.
A Technical Assistance (TA) Mission from the Regional Technical Assistance Center for Central America, Panama, and the Dominican Republic, visited the city of San Salvador, El Salvador, on August 13–24, 2018, to provide TA to the Central Reserve Bank of El Salvador (BCRES) on compiling annual accounts by institutional sectors (AAIS) from 2014 onwards, as part of the data series from the base year of 2005. In March 2018, the BCRES published a dataset of quarterly and annual national accounts series by economic activity; a monthly volume indicator; backcasted series from 1990–2014; and Supply and Use Tables (SUT) from 2005 and 2014, with a base year of 2005. As part of the dataset to be prepared and disseminated in the new 2005 base year, the authorities requested TA to compile annual accounts focusing on institutional sectors starting in 2014.
Mr. Shaun K. Roache
The economies of Central America share a close relationship with the United States, with considerable comovement of GDP growth over a long period of time. Trade, the financial sector, and remittance flows are all potential channels through which the U.S. cycle could affect the region. But just how dependent is growth in the region on the U.S.? Using the common cycles method of Vahid and Engle (1993), this paper suggests that the business cycle is dominated by the U.S.; region-specific growth drivers tend to be long-lasting shocks, rather than temporary fluctuations. The most cyclically sensitive countries include Costa Rica, El Salvador, and Honduras.
Valentina Flamini, Pierluigi Bologna, Fabio Di Vittorio, and Rasool Zandvakil