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International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Abstract

This paper highlights the exchange rate for the pound sterling soon after it began to float, moved within a relatively narrow range in relation to other major currencies and unrest in the exchange markets moderated. In some countries, such as Australia and Spain, where outward capital movements were still subject to considerable restrictions, these were relaxed to various extents. In a number of primary producing as well as industrial countries, the control of inward capital movements was motivated not by their immediate balance of payments impact but by concern over the extent of foreign ownership of certain sectors of the economy. Contrary to expectations, the monetary unrest remained and capital movements increased. After moderating somewhat in the second half of 1972, late in the period gold prices started to rise again, and they reached new peaks in early 1973. Guatemala, Hong Kong, and Kuwait abolished exchange control. Germany, invoking Article 23 of the Foreign Trade and Payments Law, restricted additional types of capital transactions between residents and nonresidents in order to ward off capital inflows.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

This is the 64th issue of the AREAER. It provides a description of the foreign exchange arrangements, exchange and trade systems, and capital controls of all IMF member countries. It also provides information on the operation of foreign exchange markets and controls on international trade. It describes controls on capital transactions and measures implemented in the financial sector, including prudential measures. In addition, it reports on exchange measures imposed by member countries for security reasons. A single table provides a snapshot of the exchange and trade systems of all IMF member countries. The Overview describes in detail how the general trend toward foreign exchange liberalization continued during 2012, alongside a strengthening of the financial sector regulatory framework. The AREAER is available in several formats. The Overview in print and online, and the detailed information for each of the 191 member countries and territories is included on a CD that accompanies the printed Overview and in an online database, AREAER Online. In addition to the information on the exchange and trade system of IMF member countries in 2012, AREAER Online contains historical data published in previous issues of the AREAER. It is searchable by year, country, and category of measure and allows cross country comparisons for time series.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The AREAER provides a description of the foreign exchange arrangements, exchange and trade systems, and capital controls of all IMF Member countries.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

Published since 1950, this authoritative annual reference is based upon a unique IMF database that tracks exchange and trade arrangements for the 187 IMF member countries, along with Hong Kong SAR, Aruba, and Curaçao and St Maarten. The Annual Report on Exchange Arrangements and Exchange Restrictions (AREAER) draws together information on exchange measures in place, the structure and setting of exchange rates, arrangements for payments and receipts, procedures for resident and nonresident accounts, controls on capital transactions, and provisions specific to the financial sector. The 52 countries covered in this special supplement have been selected as those where expanded information on the regulatory framework for capital movements was readily available to the IMF. They include countries that participated in a pilot data collection project on the regulatory framework for capital transactions conducted by the IMF in 1996, and member countries of the OECD.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Abstract

Annual Report on Exchange Arrangements and Exchange Restrictions 1950

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Abstract

Annual Report on Exchange Arrangements and Exchange Restrictions 1956

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Abstract

Annual Report on Exchange Arrangements and Exchange Restrictions 1957

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Abstract

This paper analyses relatively little overall progress in the formal relaxation of restrictions. Certainly, progress in this respect was much less than in the immediately preceding years. On the other hand, there was a significant strengthening of most internationally traded currencies, particularly in the opening months of 1958. The rates in free markets began to approximate the rates in official markets. In this respect, there was continued progress toward what is commonly called external convertibility, although the present position still falls short of formal external convertibility. In some countries, restrictions were relaxed to only a limited extent, partly because earlier relaxations had left only restrictions of a protective nature and partly because of the more complex nature of the economic trends which characterized the period. In the light of these trends and, more particularly, of the currency speculation which arose during the middle of the period, it is notable that most countries were able to defend the progress toward freer trade and payments which had been made earlier.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Abstract

This paper focuses on progress in reducing or eliminating exchange restrictions that has been substantial and has been made on a wide front; retrogressions have been comparatively few. The beneficial effects of the widening scope of currency convertibility have been felt in many areas, and the evolution toward freer, more orderly, and less discriminatory trade and payments has been strongly supported by a high level of economic activity, expanding international trade, and the general maintenance of monetary stability. Recent developments in trade and payments have not merely reduced the scope of restrictions; they have also changed the nature of these restrictions. Of key importance was the introduction of external convertibility by several countries at the end of 1958. Quotations for externally convertible currencies in exchange markets throughout the world have shown only minor fluctuations in the past twelve months. Most Western European currencies have generally been strong in terms of the US dollar.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Abstract

This paper discusses that total world trade rose significantly, particularly because of sustained European demand. With some exceptions, prices of basic products fell during the period. In this economic environment, developments in exchange markets became of focal interest to the IMF. The cumulative effect during recent years of relaxing surrender requirements and restrictions on payments has been very largely to restore to exchange markets their traditional function of reflecting the trend of international financial pressures. The difficulties that several countries faced in coordinating their internal and external monetary policies accentuated the international movements of short-term funds which had become increasingly important in preceding years. In particular, the Federal Republic of Germany and Switzerland received large amounts of foreign funds. Some countries continued to reduce their restrictions, particularly in the direction of simplifying exchange systems and liberalizing imports. These moves made a contribution toward sustaining the volume of world trade.