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International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

99/26, June 7. IMF Executive Board Completes Indonesia Review and Approves $450 Million Credit Tranche

Mr. Peter S. Heller and Mr. Alan A. Tait

International expenditure norms could be used widely both for national budgeting and planning and for international comparisons of government outlays. The authors report on an exercise which derived workable norms based on the functional and economic expenditure patterns of over 90 countries and present some of the results of using these norms.

International Monetary Fund

This 2011 Article IV Consultation reviews Côte d’Ivoire’s economic condition. Côte d’Ivoire is emerging from a decade-long sociopolitical crisis that has held back its economic growth. In 2009, Côte d’Ivoire adopted an economic and financial program supported by a three-year Extended Credit Facility (ECF) arrangement with the aim of ensuring a stable macroeconomic framework, promoting sustained growth, and reducing poverty. Executive Directors have commended Côte d’Ivoire’s rapid progress in reviving the economy. Directors have also welcomed the authorities’ good performance under the economic recovery program, especially the prudent budgetary stance.

International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

The Côte d’Ivoire government is working to reform the security apparatus. Containing fiscal risks, strengthening revenue collection, improving public financial management, and creating a business-friendly environment, through regularization of arrears on domestic debt, are the focus of the reform agenda. Sizable debt relief as a result of reaching the HIPC completion has also provided scope for new borrowing to help finance the government’s public investment program. Progress on the structural reform agenda and macroeconomic prospects are positive.

Mr. Owen Evens, Mr. Thomas H. Mayer, Mr. Philip M Young, and Horst Ungerer

Abstract

This study reviews developments in the European Monetary System from the beginning of 1983 to August 1986; it updates and complements an earlier study prepared by staff members of the International Monetary Fund and published Occasional Paper No. 19, which covered the time period from the inception of the European Monetary System to the end of 1982.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This book is intended to provide the user of debt statistics with a comparative description fo the statistics collected by the Bank for International Settlements, the International Monetary Fund, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, and the World Bank. It discusses how these statistics are gathered, why they take the form they do, and how they relate to each other.

Graeme S. Dorrance

From the Foreword to the first issue: “Among the responsibilities of the International Monetary Fund, as set forth in the Articles of Agreement, is the obligation to fact as a center for the collection and exchange of information on monetary and financial problems,’ and thereby to facilitate ‘the preparation of studies designed to assist members in developing policies which further the purposes of the Fund.’ The publications of the Fund are one way in which this responsibility is discharged. “Through the publication of Staff Papers, the Fund is making available some of the work of members of its staff. The Fund believes that these papers will be found helpful by government officials, by professional economists, and by others concerned with monetary and financial problems. Much of what is now presented is quite provisional. On some international monetary problems, final and definitive views are scarcely to be expected in the near future, and several alternative, or even conflicting, approaches may profitably be explored. The views presented in these papers are not, therefore, to be interpreted as necessarily indicating the position of the Executive Board or of the officials of the Fund.”

International Monetary Fund. Fiscal Affairs Dept.

Abstract

Chapter 1 of the report draws some early lessons from governments’ fiscal responses to the pandemic and provides a roadmap for the recovery. Governments’ measures to cushion the blow from the pandemic total a staggering $12 trillion globally. These lifelines and the worldwide recession have pushed global public debt to an all-time high. But governments should not withdraw lifelines too rapidly. Government support should shift gradually from protecting old jobs to getting people back to work and helping viable but still-vulnerable firms safely reopen. The fiscal measures for the recovery are an opportunity to make the economy more inclusive and greener. Chapter 2 of this report argues that governments need to scale up public investment to ensure successful reopening, boost growth, and prepare economies for the future. Low interest rates make borrowing to invest desirable. Countries that cannot access finance will, however, need to do more with less. The chapter explains how investment can be scaled up while preserving quality. Increasing public investment by 1 percent of GDP in advanced and emerging economies could create 7 million jobs directly, and more than 20 million jobs indirectly. Investments in healthcare, housing, digitalization, and the environment would lay the foundations for a more resilient and inclusive economy.

International Monetary Fund

The report on the Observance of Standards and Codes (ROSC) data module provides a review of France’s data dissemination practices against the International Monetary Fund’s (IMF) Special Data Dissemination Standard (SDDS), complemented by an in-depth assessment of the quality of six sets of macroeconomic statistics: national accounts, consumer price and producer price indices, government finance statistics, monetary statistics, and balance of payments statistics. Then, it presents recommendations to achieve improvements in the framework. Serviceability focuses on aspects of datasets, and accessibility deals with the availability of information to users.

International Monetary Fund

The report on the Observance of Standards and Codes (ROSC) data module provides a review of France’s data dissemination practices against the International Monetary Fund’s (IMF) Special Data Dissemination Standard (SDDS), complemented by an in-depth assessment of the quality of six sets of macroeconomic statistics: national accounts, consumer price and producer price indices, government finance statistics, monetary statistics, and balance of payments statistics. Then, it presents recommendations to achieve improvements in the framework. Serviceability focuses on aspects of datasets, and accessibility deals with the availability of information to users.