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International Monetary Fund

Abstract

As FY2010 drew to a close,1 the global economy appeared to be emerging from the worst recession in over 60 years. The recovery remained uneven, however, with some economies growing very robustly, while others were experiencing more tepid rebounds, and downside risks were increasing-and continued to do so in early FY2011. Policies are needed to address these risks and set the stage for a return to strong and sustained global growth.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The past year has been a roller coaster for the global economy.4 The severe financial crisis that followed the collapse of Lehman Brothers in September 2008 had a significant negative effect on the world economy, with global output falling by ½ percent in 2009. Advanced economies were the most significantly affected by the financial crisis, having to deal with a serious credit crunch, battered balance sheets, and rising unemployment. In these countries, output fell by 3¼ percent in 2009. The crisis was transmitted swiftly across the globe through a number of channels-including a collapse in trade, a drying up of capital flows, and a drop in remittances. When the dust had settled, it became obvious that several emerging markets and low-income countries had been severely affected by the global crisis, the worst in over 60 years.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The global economy went through a period of unprecedented financial instability in 2008-09, accompanied by the worst global economic downturn and collapse in trade in many decades. The IMF played a leading role in helping its member countries deal with the immediate challenges posed by the crisis and begin to shape a new, stronger global financial system.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

At the October 2009 Annual Meetings, the IMFC endorsed the following broad priorities for the IMF for the period ahead: (1) reassessing the institution’s mandate to encompass the full range of macroeconomic and financial sector policies that bear on global stability; (2) continuing to strengthen its financing capacity, to help members cope with balance of payments problems, including financial volatility, and reduce the perceived need for excessive reserve accumulation; (3) sharpening multilateral surveillance and better integrating it into bilateral surveillance, and undertaking further strengthening of cross-country, regional, and multilateral surveillance; and (4) reforming Fund governance, to increase the institution’s legitimacy and effectiveness.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

In FY2010, the IMF continued the implementation of internal reforms approved in 2008. Work progressed on restructuring the income and expenditure sides of the IMF accounts. Sales of IMF gold envisioned in the 2008 reforms, with the intention of enabling a move to a new income model for the Fund and supplementing its resources for concessional lending, were approved by the Board and began. On the expenditure side, further progress was made in aligning the Fund’s medium-term budget with revised objectives involving permanent reductions in expenditures and numbers of staff.