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Atish R. Ghosh and Jonathan D. Ostry

Climate Change: Stimulating a Green Recovery” looks at the global problem of climate change. With the world apparently on an economic recovery path, policymakers are looking at ways to limit the impact of climate change through broad international action. One of the challenges is to balance actions to mitigate climate change with measures to stimulate growth and prosperity. This issue of F&D also examines a variety of issues raised by the crisis—including the future of macroeconomics, explored by William White, former chief economist at the Bank for International Settlements, and the longer-term impact of the crisis on the United States, the world’s largest economy. Our “People in Economics” profile spotlights Joseph Stiglitz, the Nobel Laureate who “can’t get any respect at home.” We also look at the need for rebalancing growth in Asia, which is leading the world out of recession, and we interview five influential Asians on the region’s fragile rebound. We turn our “Straight Talk” column over to Barbara Stocking of Oxfam, who makes a forceful case for stepping up help to the most vulnerable around the world. “Data Spotlight” looks at trends in inflation, which has fallen into negative territory in some countries during the crisis, and in “Point-Counterpoint,” two experts discuss the pros and cons of remittances—funds repatriated by migrant workers to family and friends back home. “Back to Basics” gives a primer on international trade.

H. Robert Heller

Countries may now select the exchange rate system that suits them best. This article finds that there are certain underlying economic characteristics that determine a country’s choice.

NATALIA T.TAMIRISA

This paper considers the effect of exchange and capital controls on trade in the gravity-equation framework, in which bilateral exports depend on the distance between countries, the countries’ size and wealth, tariff barriers, and exchange and capital controls. The extent of exchange and capital controls is measured by unique indices. In view of the degree to which countries have liberalized their exchange systems, controls on current payments and transfers are found to be a minor impediment to trade, while capital controls significantly reduce exports into developing and transition economies. Thus, further capital account liberalization could significantly foster trade.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
Prize or Penalty: When Sports Help Economies Score" looks at why countries vie to host the world's most costly sporting events. And, in a series of articles on "After the Crisis," we discuss why some countries were hit harder than others; how were shocks transmitted round the world, and whether protectionist pressures might intensify in 2010. As usual, we take on a number of hot topics, including housing prices, bankers' bonuses, Ponzi schemes, and inflation targeting. In "Picture This" we see that the number of hungry is on the rise, topping 1 billion. Our regular "People in Economics" column profiles Daron Acemoglu, the Turkish-born intellectual who won the American Economic Association's award in 2005 for the most influential U.S. economist under the age of 40. "Back to Basics" explains inflation; and "Data Spotlight" looks at how dollarization is declining in Latin America. Also includes articles by Nick Stern on climate change and Simon Johnson on bonuses and the "doomsday cycle
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
Prize or Penalty: When Sports Help Economies Score" looks at why countries vie to host the world's most costly sporting events. And, in a series of articles on "After the Crisis," we discuss why some countries were hit harder than others; how were shocks transmitted round the world, and whether protectionist pressures might intensify in 2010. As usual, we take on a number of hot topics, including housing prices, bankers' bonuses, Ponzi schemes, and inflation targeting. In "Picture This" we see that the number of hungry is on the rise, topping 1 billion. Our regular "People in Economics" column profiles Daron Acemoglu, the Turkish-born intellectual who won the American Economic Association's award in 2005 for the most influential U.S. economist under the age of 40. "Back to Basics" explains inflation; and "Data Spotlight" looks at how dollarization is declining in Latin America. Also includes articles by Nick Stern on climate change and Simon Johnson on bonuses and the "doomsday cycle
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
Au sommet de ce numéro, intitulé « La médaille et son revers : quand sport et économie font équipe » : pourquoi les pays se pressent pour accueillir les événements sportifs les plus coûteux du monde. En outre, dans une série d'articles sur le thème « Après la crise », nous examinons pourquoi certains pays ont été frappés plus durement que d'autres, comment les chocs se sont transmis au monde entier, et si les tentations protectionnistes pourraient s'intensifier en 2010. Comme de coutume, nous examinons un certain nombre de sujets d'actualité, tels que les prix de l'immobilier, les primes accordées aux banquiers, les systèmes de Ponzi, et le ciblage de l'inflation. La rubrique «Pleins feux» est consacrée à l’aggravation du problème de la faim dans le monde, qui touche plus d'un milliard de personnes. Dans «Paroles d’économistes», nous rencontrons Daron Acemoglu, intellectuel d’origine turque qui a reçu en 2005 le prix de l’American Economic Association, décerné à l’économiste américain de moins de 40 ans le plus influent. « L’ABC de l’économie » explique ce qu'est l'inflation, et la rubrique « Gros plan » se penche sur le recul de la dollarisation en Amérique latine. Aussi dans ce numéro : des articles de Nick Stern sur le changement climatique et de Simon Johnson sur les bonus et le « cycle apocalyptique ».
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
En “Gol a favor o en contra: Cuando los deportes refuerzan la economía” se estudia por qué los países compiten por albergar los eventos deportivos más costosos del mundo. Asimismo, en una serie de artículos titulada “Después de la crisis”, examinamos la razón por la cual algunos países sufrieron en forma más pronunciada que otros los efectos de la crisis; cómo se transmiten los shocks en el mundo, y la posibilidad de que el proteccionismo comercial se intensifique en 2010. Como es habitual pasamos revista a varios temas de plena actualidad, como los precios de la vivienda, las bonificaciones en el sector bancario, los esquemas de Ponzi y las metas de inflación. En “Bajo la lupa” observamos que la cantidad de personas que padecen hambre vuelve a aumentar en algunas regiones del mundo, alcanzando a más de 1.000 millones. En nuestra columna “Gente del mundo de la economía” trazamos una semblanza de Daron Acemoglu, el intelectual de origen turco que en 2005 ganó el premio de la American Economic Association al economista estadounidense menor de 40 años más influyente. En “Vuelta a lo esencial” estudiamos qué es la inflación, y en “Un vistazo a las cifras” se examina la disminución de la dolarización en América Latina. También se presentan artículos de Nick Stern sobre el cambio climático y de Simon Johnson sobre las bonificaciones y el "ciclo apocalíptico".
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
Prize or Penalty: When Sports Help Economies Score" looks at why countries vie to host the world's most costly sporting events. And, in a series of articles on "After the Crisis," we discuss why some countries were hit harder than others; how were shocks transmitted round the world, and whether protectionist pressures might intensify in 2010. As usual, we take on a number of hot topics, including housing prices, bankers' bonuses, Ponzi schemes, and inflation targeting. In "Picture This" we see that the number of hungry is on the rise, topping 1 billion. Our regular "People in Economics" column profiles Daron Acemoglu, the Turkish-born intellectual who won the American Economic Association's award in 2005 for the most influential U.S. economist under the age of 40. "Back to Basics" explains inflation; and "Data Spotlight" looks at how dollarization is declining in Latin America. Also includes articles by Nick Stern on climate change and Simon Johnson on bonuses and the "doomsday cycle