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International Monetary Fund
The staff report for The Bahamas’s 2009 Article IV Consultation examines economic developments and policies. The financial sector, including the offshore sector, accounts for about 20 percent of economic activity. Exchange controls are maintained on capital transactions, narrowing the field of investment opportunities for local wealth, largely to real estate and government debt. Macroeconomic policy has historically been geared to maintaining fiscal sustainability, attracting investment, and supporting the exchange rate peg.
International Monetary Fund
The Bahamas showed strong performance owing to its prudent macroeconomic management. Executive Directors welcomed this step, and emphasized the need to strengthen fiscal and international reserve positions, and diversify the economic base to maintain confidence and reduce economic vulnerabilities. They stressed the need to accelerate structural reforms, improve financial supervision and regulation, and to bring the regimes for combating money laundering and terrorism financing. They appreciated The Bahamas's participation in the General Data Dissemination System, and encouraged action to remove inconsistencies that exist in the economic data.
International Monetary Fund
Prudent macroeconomic management, strong growth, low inflation, small fiscal deficit, and public debt have helped The Bahamas attain the highest standard of living in the Caribbean. Executive Directors supported the government’s goals of balancing the budget and reducing debt. They encouraged the use of market-based monetary policy and tax administration. They emphasized the need of a macroeconomic policy framework, international reserves, and a strong financial framework. Directors appreciated the performance of the financial system and also for modernizing the regime to combat money laundering and terrorism financing.
International Monetary Fund
The Bahamas depends heavily on tourism and financial services. Executive Directors have commended the strong track record of prudent macroeconomic management, but have encouraged the government to broaden the domestic tax base, reduce distortions, increase the resilience of revenues to shocks, and specify contingency measures to reign in the growth in public debt. Greater transparency will underpin the medium-term fiscal strategy, and a higher international reserve coverage will help reduce vulnerabilities. Measures under way to strengthen the financial system have been commended.
International Monetary Fund
The Bahamian economy began a tepid recovery in 2010, following a sharp recession in 2008 and 2009 in the wake of the global financial crisis. Real GDP grew by about 1 percent. The rebound was driven by the trade, hospitality, transport, and government services sectors. Executive Directors welcomed the gradual recovery of the Bahamian economy. They also called for steadfast implementation of reforms to place public debt on a sustainable path, build fiscal buffers, and enhance medium-term growth prospects.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
The article highlights the economic condition, fiscal policies, external stability, and financial growth strategy of The Bahamas. The economy of The Bahamas showed gradual growth of about 2.5 percent by 2012, but there were challenges for the country. The nation has to rebuild macroeconomic buffers against external imbalances, regulate nonperforming loans, reduce unemployment, and increase the business sector. This assessment is an analysis of The Bahamas’ recent development and forthcoming plans to encounter global threats.
International Monetary Fund
This paper presents background on Caribbean small states as context for the main paper, “Macroeconomic Issues in Small States and Implications for Fund Engagement.” It draws on recent analytical work presented at a conference for policy makers in September 2012, in Trinidad and Tobago. Caribbean small states, while sharing many features of other small states (size-related macroeconomic vulnerabilities, lack of economies of scale, and capacity constraints) have specific characteristics which merit attention