Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 17 items for :

  • International trade x
  • Yemen, Republic of x
Clear All
Mr. Mohsin S. Khan and Mr. Morris Goldstein

Abstract

One of the more important yet puzzling aspects of the recent global stagflation has been the rather surprising resiliency of growth rates of real income in non-oil developing countries during the 1973-80 period in the face of the marked slowdown of corresponding growth rates in the industrial world. The primary purpose of this paper is to shed some light on this phenomenon by examining the relationship between the rate of economic growth in the non-oil developing countries and that in the industrial countries over the past decade or so.

Mr. P. van den Boogaerde

Abstract

Arab financial assistance to developing - particularly Arab - countries rose sharply between 1973 and 1980 but fell gradually through the 1980s, owing mainly to weakening oil prices. As a percent of GNP, however, Arab contributions remain the largest among major donors. This paper surveys the volume and distribution of Arab financing from 1973 to 1989.

Mr. Mohsin S. Khan and Mr. Morris Goldstein

Abstract

For the past hundred years the rate of growth of output in the developing world has depended on the rate of growth of output in the developed world. When the developed grow fast the developing grow fast, and when the developed slow down, the developing slow down. Is this linkage inevitable?1

Mr. Mohsin S. Khan and Mr. Morris Goldstein

Abstract

In this section we begin our investigation into how the rate of growth of real income in industrial countries affects the income growth rate in non-oil developing countries by considering the relationship between income growth in the former and export growth in the latter.

Mr. Mohsin S. Khan and Mr. Morris Goldstein

Abstract

This section focuses on the relationship between the export growth of non-oil developing countries and their economic growth rates. In brief, an attempt is made to identify the channels by which exports affect economic growth; whether the relationship between the two growth rates is rigid or subject to change; whether the relationship has strengthened or weakened over time; and how the relationship differs among the subgroups of non-oil developing countries.

International Monetary Fund
In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.
Mr. Robert L. Sharer, Ms. Nur Calika, John Starrels, Mr. Edouard Maciejewski, Klaus Enders, and Mr. David M. Cheney

25th Anniversary Year

Mr. Antonio Spilimbergo

IMF research summary on how globalization affects developing countries (by Prachi Mishra and Petia Topalova); country study on Croatia (by Athanasios Vamvakidis); listing of visiting scholars at the IMF during June 2007-January 2008; listing of contents of Vol. 54, Issue No. 3 of IMF Staff Papers; listing of recent IMF Working Papers; and listing of recent external publications by IMF staff members.

Ms. Helene Poirson Ward, Mr. Luca A Ricci, and Ms. Catherine A Pattillo
This paper assesses the non linear impact of external debt on growth using a large panel data set of 93 developing countries over 1969–98. Results are generally robust across different econometric methodologies, regression specifications, and different debt indicators. For a country with average indebtedness, doubling the debt ratio would reduce annual per capita growth by between half and a full percentage point. The differential in per capita growth between countries with external indebtedness (in net present value) below 100 percent of exports and above 300 percent of exports seems to be in excess of 2 percent per annum. For countries that are to benefit from debt reduction under the current HIPC initiative, per capita growth might increase by 1 percentage point, unless constrained by other macroeconomic and structural economic distortions. Our findings also suggest that the average impact of debt becomes negative at about 160–170 percent of exports or 35–40 percent of GDP. The marginal impact of debt starts being negative at about half of these values. High debt appears to reduce growth mainly by lowering the efficiency of investment rather than its volume.