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International Monetary Fund

This 2006 Article IV Consultation highlights that real GDP in the Federated States of Micronesia grew by only 1½ percent in FY2005 and declined by nearly 1 percent in FY2006. The underlying fiscal situation has deteriorated, despite a decline in the overall deficit. Executive Directors have recommended that spending cuts and comprehensive tax reforms be phased in to secure fiscal sustainability. Priority should be given to reducing the public sector wage bill, which is large by regional standards, possibly in the context of a broad reform of the public sector.

International Monetary Fund

The staff report for the 2008 Article IV Consultation of the Federated States of Micronesia examines economic developments and policies. Growth could recover modestly in the near term as falling commodity prices boost real incomes and progress is made on spending unused compact infrastructure grants. The authorities have limited tools to address risks from the global slowdown. Given the urgency of fiscal consolidation, expenditures should be streamlined and preparations for the comprehensive tax reform intensified.

International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept

The Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) is highly dependent on external aid. Following a recession in FY2006–08, the FSM economy has grown by 2–2½ percent for FY2010 and FY2011. The economy remains dependent on the large public sector, although the fisheries and agriculture sectors have shown signs of growth. Despite some deterioration in current account balance, external balance also has sustained a stable flow of official transfers. However, economic growth is likely to slow in the near term owing to a decline in public sector demand.

International Monetary Fund
This 2002 Article IV Consultation highlights that the economic activity in the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) is estimated to have slowed. Despite the use of the bump-up funds by some of the FSM’s four state governments to boost spending during FY2002, GDP is estimated to have grown only by 0.8 percent. The fiscal stimulus appears to have been mostly offset by an emerging fiscal crisis in Chuuk and a “wait and see” attitude of the private sector in the face of uncertainty associated with the new Compact of Free Association.
International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept
The Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) is highly dependent on external aid. Following a recession in FY2006–08, the FSM economy has grown by 2–2½ percent for FY2010 and FY2011. The economy remains dependent on the large public sector, although the fisheries and agriculture sectors have shown signs of growth. Despite some deterioration in current account balance, external balance also has sustained a stable flow of official transfers. However, economic growth is likely to slow in the near term owing to a decline in public sector demand.
International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept
This 2015 Article IV Consultation highlights that Micronesia’s economy is stagnating, as externally funded infrastructure projects are moving slowly. Difficulties in the business climate, in particular those related to land tenure issues, continue to hold back private sector development. Real GDP growth of about 0.1 percent is estimated for the fiscal year 2014. The Micronesian economy is projected to grow at 0.6 percent in the medium term, while risks on the outlook are tilted to the downside. Growth in 2015 is projected to remain subdued at 0.3 percent, while consumer prices are projected to further decline to negative 1.0 percent thanks to the continued pass through of low oil prices.
International Monetary Fund
This paper analyzes recent economic developments in the Federated States of Micronesia. Real GDP grew by a modest 1 percent in 1995, well below the average growth rate recorded during 1991–94, according to tentative estimates prepared by the IMF staff. The overall fiscal balance of the national government has registered surpluses for the past several years. Total revenue and grants have increased, mainly reflecting higher nontax revenue from fishing license fees from Korea and Taiwan, Province of China, and higher non-Compact grants.
International Monetary Fund
This paper reviews economic developments in the Federated States of Micronesia during 1994–97. Real GDP growth, which has been sluggish in recent years, contracted by 4 percent in FY1997. This mainly reflects a sharp reduction in government expenditures under the reform program implemented by the national and state governments since FY1996, the cornerstone of which is the reduction in workforce and wage levels of government employees. The 1996 official GDP data indicated that government services accounted for 42 percent of GDP, wholesale and retail trade for 22 percent, and agriculture, hunting, and forestry for 17 percent.
International Monetary Fund
The small states of the Asia and Pacific region face unique challenges in raising their growth potential and living standards. These countries are particularly vulnerable because of their small populations, geographical isolation and dispersion, narrow export and production bases, lack of economies of scale, limited access to international capital markets, exposure to shocks (including climate change), and heavy reliance on aid. In providing public services, they face higher fixed government costs relative to other states because public services must be provided regardless of their small population size. Low access to credit by the private sector is an impediment to inclusive growth. Capacity constraints are another key challenge. The small states also face more limited policy tools. Five out of 13 countries do not have a central bank and the scope for diversifying their economies is narrow. Given their large development needs, fiscal policies have been, at times, pro-cyclical. Within the Asia-Pacific small states group, the micro states are subject to more vulnerability and macroeconomic volatility than the rest of the Asia-Pacific small states.
International Monetary Fund

This 2002 Article IV Consultation highlights that the economic activity in the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) is estimated to have slowed. Despite the use of the bump-up funds by some of the FSM’s four state governments to boost spending during FY2002, GDP is estimated to have grown only by 0.8 percent. The fiscal stimulus appears to have been mostly offset by an emerging fiscal crisis in Chuuk and a “wait and see” attitude of the private sector in the face of uncertainty associated with the new Compact of Free Association.