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International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.

International Monetary Fund

This paper discusses key findings of the First Review Under the Stand-By Arrangement for Guatemala. The fiscal deficit is increasing owing to a sharp decline in revenues, associated with the contraction in imports and domestic demand. The policy interest rate has been cut. All quantitative performance criteria through June have been met. Inflation has fallen below the consultation band set in the program, triggering a consultation with IMF staff. Fiscal policy needs to continue striking a balance between avoiding a procyclical stance and maintaining debt sustainability.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

IMF Country Report No. 21/111

International Monetary Fund

The Guatemalan economy is recovering faster than anticipated during the previous program review. The economic outlook has improved since the second program review. The fiscal deficit in 2010 will decline somewhat. There was agreement that a comprehensive tax reform remains the key medium-term challenge. There was agreement that monetary policy should remain vigilant. There has been progress in advancing financial sector reforms, but key elements of the reform agenda are pending. The near-term outlook has improved since the second program review, and downside risks have declined further.

International Monetary Fund

This paper discusses a request from the Guatemalan authorities for an 18-month Stand-By Arrangement (SBA) with total access of SDR 630.6 million (about US$951 million). Guatemala has a strong track record of macroeconomic stability. The economy is open and hence vulnerable to external shocks. The authorities have taken a number of upfront measures to mitigate the impact of the external shock and preserve macroeconomic stability. The program will support the authorities’ policies and provide insurance against significant downside risks.

International Monetary Fund

The paper presents statistical data on comparative social indicators, selected economic indicators, selected national accounts aggregates, summary expenditure and savings, summary consumer price indices, summary operations of the combined public sector, and summary of central government operations of Guatemala. The data on real gross domestic expenditure, labor productivity indicators, trends in unit labor costs, real wages, productivity, and employment, nonfinancial public sector operations, summary accounts of the financial system, detailed balance of payments, and imports by origin, and related economic indices are also presented.

International Monetary Fund

This paper discusses key findings of the First Review Under the Stand-By Arrangement for Guatemala. The fiscal deficit is increasing owing to a sharp decline in revenues, associated with the contraction in imports and domestic demand. The policy interest rate has been cut. All quantitative performance criteria through June have been met. Inflation has fallen below the consultation band set in the program, triggering a consultation with IMF staff. Fiscal policy needs to continue striking a balance between avoiding a procyclical stance and maintaining debt sustainability.

International Monetary Fund

This paper reviews economic developments in Guatemala during 1990–95. In 1993–94, output growth was led by a buoyant services sector while activities in the primary and secondary sectors slowed. Domestic demand grew strongly in 1991–92 owing to a substantial expansion in private investment and an increase in consumption. Growth of domestic demand slowed in 1993–94 because of sluggishness in private fixed capital formation. The rate of inflation fell from 60 percent in 1990 to 11½ percent in 1993–94.