Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 31 items for :

  • Micronesia, Federated States of x
  • Macroeconomics x
Clear All
International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept

The Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) is highly dependent on external aid. Following a recession in FY2006–08, the FSM economy has grown by 2–2½ percent for FY2010 and FY2011. The economy remains dependent on the large public sector, although the fisheries and agriculture sectors have shown signs of growth. Despite some deterioration in current account balance, external balance also has sustained a stable flow of official transfers. However, economic growth is likely to slow in the near term owing to a decline in public sector demand.

International Monetary Fund

The staff report for the 2008 Article IV Consultation of the Federated States of Micronesia examines economic developments and policies. Growth could recover modestly in the near term as falling commodity prices boost real incomes and progress is made on spending unused compact infrastructure grants. The authorities have limited tools to address risks from the global slowdown. Given the urgency of fiscal consolidation, expenditures should be streamlined and preparations for the comprehensive tax reform intensified.

International Monetary Fund

This 2006 Article IV Consultation highlights that real GDP in the Federated States of Micronesia grew by only 1½ percent in FY2005 and declined by nearly 1 percent in FY2006. The underlying fiscal situation has deteriorated, despite a decline in the overall deficit. Executive Directors have recommended that spending cuts and comprehensive tax reforms be phased in to secure fiscal sustainability. Priority should be given to reducing the public sector wage bill, which is large by regional standards, possibly in the context of a broad reform of the public sector.

International Monetary Fund

This Selected Issues paper examines the reasons for the poor initial performance of the Compact Trust Fund (CTF) of Micronesia and the issues related to the governance framework. The design and recent implementation of the CTF raise concerns that Micronesia will still face a difficult transition after U.S. aid ends in FY2023. The paper provides forecasts for the fund over the medium term. It also examines the business environment in Micronesia and identifies possible areas for improvement.

International Monetary Fund

This 2002 Article IV Consultation highlights that the economic activity in the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) is estimated to have slowed. Despite the use of the bump-up funds by some of the FSM’s four state governments to boost spending during FY2002, GDP is estimated to have grown only by 0.8 percent. The fiscal stimulus appears to have been mostly offset by an emerging fiscal crisis in Chuuk and a “wait and see” attitude of the private sector in the face of uncertainty associated with the new Compact of Free Association.

International Monetary Fund

The staff report for the 2004 Article IV Consultation on the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) focuses on economic developments and policies. Fiscal and structural reforms are needed for the FSM to achieve self-sufficiency. The large government sector will be increasingly unsustainable given coming declines in grants. Fiscal adjustment will need to comprise both expenditure cuts and revenue measures. Structural reform priorities should include improvements to the legal framework for land use, foreign investment, and lending.

International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept

KEY ISSUES Context. Raising growth and ensuring long-term fiscal sustainability remain the two critical issues of the FSM. The reform agenda, in particular, the tax reform package and growth-enhancing reforms, hinges on achieving a national consensus in a loosely federated nation. Outlook. The economy stagnated in FY2014 (ending September) with real growth estimated at 0.1 percent, reflecting a slowdown in the implementation of infrastructure projects. Inflation dropped to 0.7 percent in FY2014 on account of falling oil prices. The current account strengthened due to a tax windfall from a company’s sale of shares launched on a foreign stock exchange and an increase in fishing license fees. Growth in FY2015 is expected to remain almost flat at 0.3 percent, while damages caused by the recent typhoon Maysak could dampen the economy. Fiscal sector. The authorities have started some reforms in view of the expiration in 2023 of grants provided under the Compact of Free Association with the U.S. State governments have started fiscal consolidation while the Unified Revenue Authority (URA) has been established. The authorities agreed that more needs to be done to achieve fiscal sustainability, in particular, by implementing the tax reform package that includes replacing the state sales taxes with a VAT. They noted that further reforms hinge on achieving a national consensus. Investment climate. Land tenure issues continue to constrain private sector development and the authorities should redouble efforts in expediting the land survey and registration process. On tourism, the authorities expressed optimism that the recent extension of the runway at the main island airport in Pohnpei could lead to more eco- tourism that preserves the cultural heritage and pristine nature of the country. Financial sector. Credit unions are currently not being supervised and a new legislation is underway to put them under the supervision of the Banking Board. The authorities have requested further TA from PFTAC and the Legal Department of the Fund.

International Monetary Fund

This 2002 Article IV Consultation highlights that the economic activity in the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) is estimated to have slowed. Despite the use of the bump-up funds by some of the FSM’s four state governments to boost spending during FY2002, GDP is estimated to have grown only by 0.8 percent. The fiscal stimulus appears to have been mostly offset by an emerging fiscal crisis in Chuuk and a “wait and see” attitude of the private sector in the face of uncertainty associated with the new Compact of Free Association.