Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 38 items for :

  • Bahamas, The x
  • Debts, Public x
Clear All
International Monetary Fund

The Bahamian economy began a tepid recovery in 2010, following a sharp recession in 2008 and 2009 in the wake of the global financial crisis. Real GDP grew by about 1 percent. The rebound was driven by the trade, hospitality, transport, and government services sectors. Executive Directors welcomed the gradual recovery of the Bahamian economy. They also called for steadfast implementation of reforms to place public debt on a sustainable path, build fiscal buffers, and enhance medium-term growth prospects.

International Monetary Fund

The Bahamian economy has experienced a sustained growth led by substantial inflows of foreign investment in tourism, shipping, and construction, and a steady expansion of financial services. Executive Directors commended the sound macroeconomic policies and the decline in unemployment, and emphasized the need for maintaining a prudent fiscal stance, enhancing competitiveness, and accelerating structural reforms. They commended the progress in eliminating the central government deficit and money laundering, and stressed the need to strengthen the country's statistical base.

International Monetary Fund

The Bahamas showed strong performance owing to its prudent macroeconomic management. Executive Directors welcomed this step, and emphasized the need to strengthen fiscal and international reserve positions, and diversify the economic base to maintain confidence and reduce economic vulnerabilities. They stressed the need to accelerate structural reforms, improve financial supervision and regulation, and to bring the regimes for combating money laundering and terrorism financing. They appreciated The Bahamas's participation in the General Data Dissemination System, and encouraged action to remove inconsistencies that exist in the economic data.

International Monetary Fund

The Bahamas depends heavily on tourism and financial services. Executive Directors have commended the strong track record of prudent macroeconomic management, but have encouraged the government to broaden the domestic tax base, reduce distortions, increase the resilience of revenues to shocks, and specify contingency measures to reign in the growth in public debt. Greater transparency will underpin the medium-term fiscal strategy, and a higher international reserve coverage will help reduce vulnerabilities. Measures under way to strengthen the financial system have been commended.

International Monetary Fund

The Bahamas’s 2005 Article IV Consultation reports that the economic slowdown has contributed to deterioration in the fiscal accounts. The Bahamas is a small, open, and relatively wealthy economy, which is highly dependent on tourism from the United States and offshore financial activities. Offshore financial activities have developed rapidly since the early 1990s and account for roughly 15 percent of GDP. This has reduced the economy’s dependence on the tourism sector, which is focused on the higher end of the U.S. market but still accounts for one-fourth of GDP.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

2019 Article IV Consultation-Press Release; and Staff Report

International Monetary Fund

This 1999 Article IV Consultation highlights that real GDP growth for The Bahamas accelerated from less than 1 percent a year in 1994–95 to 4 percent in 1996, but slowed somewhat in 1997–98 as construction work on a second phase of tourism projects led to a decline in the number of available hotel rooms and in tourist arrivals. Following the completion of the expansion projects in November–December 1998, tourist arrivals rose sharply in the first quarter of 1999.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

Context. Economic activity strengthened somewhat in 2014 while the external current account deficit worsened primarily as a result of Baha Mar construction-related imports. The authorities continue to make substantial progress on fiscal consolidation with successful VAT implementation in January 2015 setting the stage for continued improvements in the fiscal position. Lower oil prices helped keep inflation anchored in 2014. Still, notwithstanding the capital flow management (CFM) regime, international reserves remain low. Key policy advice: Despite the U.S. recovery and the imminent opening of the Baha Mar resort, the growth outlook remains well below pre-global crisis levels, and strong and timely measures should be implemented to strengthen competitiveness and raise potential growth. In addition, rebuilding fiscal and external buffers will be essential for sustaining macroeconomic stability: • Reigniting strong and inclusive medium-term growth. Structural reforms are needed to address longstanding competiveness issues including labor market impediments to growth. Energy sector reforms could substantially lower energy costs, boost productivity and facilitate economic diversification in the medium term. A diversification strategy should explore the potential for increasing value added in the tourism sector, including through deepening linkages with agriculture. • Rebuilding fiscal and external buffers. Notwithstanding the CFM regime, the fixed exchange rate peg constrains monetary policy, leaving fiscal policy as the main instrument for macroeconomic stabilization. Steadfast implementation of the VAT and expenditure rationalization in the context of a medium-term budgetary framework, together with public enterprise reforms, would help rebuild fiscal buffers and support international reserves. • Preserving financial sector stability. The pre-crisis credit boom has left the banking system with an overhang of non-performing loans, which will likely continue to generate headwinds for the economy. Despite this, the banking system remains very well capitalized and liquid. Measures should be put in place to resolve the debt overhang while further strengthening the regulatory and supervisory framework.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

This 2016 Article IV Consultation highlights that economic growth in The Bahamas is estimated to have stalled in 2015, as a modest increase in air tourism arrivals was not sufficient to offset a contraction in domestic demand and weak exports of goods. Private consumption and investment were weighed down by headwinds from fiscal consolidation, as well as an end to construction. Inflation was moderate at 1.9 percent on average in 2015. Growth is expected to strengthen to about 0.5 percent in 2016, supported by continued growth in air tourist arrivals and moderating headwinds to private consumption and investment.

International Monetary Fund

The Bahamas showed strong performance owing to its prudent macroeconomic management. Executive Directors welcomed this step, and emphasized the need to strengthen fiscal and international reserve positions, and diversify the economic base to maintain confidence and reduce economic vulnerabilities. They stressed the need to accelerate structural reforms, improve financial supervision and regulation, and to bring the regimes for combating money laundering and terrorism financing. They appreciated The Bahamas's participation in the General Data Dissemination System, and encouraged action to remove inconsistencies that exist in the economic data.