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International Monetary Fund

This paper assesses the link between public investment and economic growth in Burkina Faso. It also evaluates Burkina Faso's external competitiveness by using a comparison of REER to its equilibrium levels and a survey-based assessment of overall competitiveness. The report attempts to quantify the impact of rainfall and terms-of-trade shocks on the Burkinabe economy and draws policy measures to lessen external shocks. The report assesses that industrial mining has become a source of foreign exchange and government revenue, which requires transparent management and accountability.

International Monetary Fund

This Selected Issues and Statistical Appendix paper on Burkina Faso reviews background information and analytical support for key policy issues. This paper extends the results from the debt sustainability analysis for Burkina Faso and develops two alternative debt ratios that are suitable for assessing the impact of discount rate changes on the debt burden of the country. To better understand the implications of discount rate changes on the debt situation, the set of available debt ratios by developing two new measures of debt burden were extended.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

The IMF will continue to remind industrial countries of their responsibilities to provide more effective support to developing countries—both through higher, more predictable, and better coordinated aid and through more open trade polices, said IMF Managing Director Rodrigo de Rato on concluding a visit to Burkina Faso on September 9. This is the latest in a series of listening tours to IMF member countries undertaken by the IMF’s Managing Director to sound out governments and civil society about their priorities and main concerns. His most recent travel included stops in South America and sub-Saharan Africa.

Mark Baird and Sudhir Shetty

This paper describes why the international community needs to act now to stand a chance of meeting the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The paper gives example of Ethiopia, one of the poorest countries in the world, with an estimated per capita income of about US$100. According to the World Bank, recent national household surveys find 44 percent of the people in Ethiopia cannot meet basic needs. The paper discusses that Ethiopia in many ways epitomizes why the MDGs are important and why more money is needed to achieve them.

International Monetary Fund
Depuis plusieurs années, le FMI publie un nombre croissant de rapports et autres documents couvrant l'évolution et les tendances économiques et financières dans les pays membres. Chaque rapport, rédigé par une équipe des services du FMI à la suite d'entretiens avec des représentants des autorités, est publié avec l'accord du pays concerné.
International Monetary Fund
This paper assesses the link between public investment and economic growth in Burkina Faso. It also evaluates Burkina Faso's external competitiveness by using a comparison of REER to its equilibrium levels and a survey-based assessment of overall competitiveness. The report attempts to quantify the impact of rainfall and terms-of-trade shocks on the Burkinabe economy and draws policy measures to lessen external shocks. The report assesses that industrial mining has become a source of foreign exchange and government revenue, which requires transparent management and accountability.
International Monetary Fund
This abstract discusses Benin’s poverty reduction strategy (PRS1). The PRS1 serves as both a strategic frame of reference and a framework for dialogue with technical and financial partners (TFPs). The six major phases involved in the preparation of the growth and poverty reduction strategy (GPRS) and design of the macroeconomic and budgetary framework have been explained in this paper. The impact of macroeconomic and budgetary framework on the attainment of the MDGs and on the poverty reduction is also reviewed.
Mr. Montfort Mlachila and Mr. Tidiane Kinda
With the exception of Burkina Faso and Mali, the growth experience for WAEMU countries has been disappointing, even when compared to other sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries. The main objective of the paper is to investigate why the quest for a growth takeoff has been more elusive in the WAEMU countries compared to other SSA countries. To do this, the paper focuses on the determinants of growth accelerations and decelerations in SSA and the WAEMU. It finds that the variables most closely associated with growth accelerations and decelerations in SSA are changes in terms of trade, private investment, civil tension, real exchange rates, and inflation. Second, as found elsewhere in the literature, there is a certain asymmetry between accelerations and decelerations, in both frequency and determinants, and that the WAEMU region is quite different from the rest of SSA.