Browse

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • Investments: Commodities x
  • El Salvador x
Clear All
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
This paper highlights that since its inception in 1956, the International Finance Corporation (IFC) has invested more than US$1.7 billion in nearly 300 enterprises in 62 developing countries in total projects costing about US$9 billion. The IFC is the affiliate of the World Bank, which has been given the specific task of furthering economic development by encouraging the growth of productive private enterprise in developing countries. The paper underscores that IFC plays an essentially catalytic role in generating investment funds from local and foreign sources.
International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.
This paper explains the features of the Communaute Financiere Africaine (CFA) Franc system. All CFA countries belong to one of three monetary systems. Although their statutes and functions differ somewhat, the three central banks have various common features. All three central banks are authorized to extend short-term and medium-term credit to the private sector. Many the commercial banks operating in the CFA countries are French banks with head offices in Paris. The credit operations of the commercial banks in the CFA countries are largely dependent upon the rediscount facilities offered by the central banks. The Bank is the sole authority for issuing CFA currency in the countries of French Equatorial Africa and in Cameroon. The exchange regulations applied in the CFA countries are patterned on those of France, with adaptations decided upon by local authorities according to local conditions and requirements. While exchange transactions with the other franc area countries generally are free, those with the non-franc area are subject to licensing.
Mr. Andrei A Levchenko and Quý Toàn Ðo
We analyze the relationship between international trade and the quality of economic institutions, such as contract enforcement, rule of law, and property rights. In our model, firms differ in their preferences for institutional quality, which is determined endogenously in a political economy framework. We show that trade opening can worsen institutions when it increases the political power of a small elite of large exporters who prefer to maintain bad institutions. The detrimental effect of trade on institutions is most likely to occur when a small country captures a sufficiently large share of world exports in sectors characterized by economic profits.
Grant B. Taplin

WORLD TRADE MODELS have been developed both because of the inherent interest in the flow of resources from country to country and as a remedy for the oversimplified treatment of the foreign sector in domestic models. In most domestic models, the foreign sector is treated either as autonomous and predetermined or as a function of domestic factors exclusively.2 The international economy, however, is a complex network of interrelated trade flows, capital movements, and payments settlements. It is a system in which domestically induced changes in one country’s income, prices, and other economic forces affect economic activity in other countries, which in turn transmit the changes on to each other and to the country of origin. These influences are especially important in the formulation of domestic policies and in the international coordination of national economic policies.