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Charlotte J. Lundgren, Mr. Alun H. Thomas, and Mr. Robert C York
Sizeable natural resource endowments and potentially large financial inflows from their extraction provide an unparalleled opportunity for economic growth and development in a growing number of sub-Saharan African countries. Empirical evidence suggests, however, that translating this resource wealth into stronger economic performance and a higher standard of living has proven challenging. Much has been written about the resource curse. This publication focuses on solutions to the challenges and outlines the main policy considerations and options in managing natural resource wealth, drawing on experience within and outside sub-Saharan Africa and referring closely to the latest analysis and policy advice in this area by the IMF, the World Bank, and leading academic research. A key feature of each chapter is a recommended reading list for those who wish additional, more in-depth material on these issues to further inform policymakers and other stakeholders on the theoretical and analytical underpinnings of the policy advice.
Charlotte J. Lundgren, Mr. Alun H. Thomas, and Mr. Robert C York
Un nombre croissant de pays d'Afrique subsaharienne disposent de ressources naturelles considérables ; leur extraction pourrait générer d'importantes retombées financières qui présentent un potentiel inédit de croissance économique et de développement. Pourtant, force est de constater qu’il n’est pas simple de mettre ces richesses au service du développement économique et de l’amélioration des niveaux de vie. On a beaucoup écrit sur la « malédiction des ressources naturelles ». Cette publication examine ce que peuvent faire les pouvoirs publics face à ces défis et présente les principales considérations de politique économique et les options envisageables pour gérer les ressources naturelles, en s'appuyant sur l'expérience des pays d'Afrique subsaharienne et d'autres régions, sur la dernière analyse du FMI et ses conseils en la matière, ainsi que sur des études de la Banque mondiale et les travaux d'éminents universitaires. Chaque chapitre comporte une liste de documents dont la lecture est recommandée aux décideurs et autres parties prenantes pour les informer plus en détail sur les fondements théoriques et analytiques des conseils fournis.
Charlotte J. Lundgren, Mr. Alun H. Thomas, and Mr. Robert C York
Sizeable natural resource endowments and potentially large financial inflows from their extraction provide an unparalleled opportunity for economic growth and development in a growing number of sub-Saharan African countries. Empirical evidence suggests, however, that translating this resource wealth into stronger economic performance and a higher standard of living has proven challenging. Much has been written about the resource curse. This publication focuses on solutions to the challenges and outlines the main policy considerations and options in managing natural resource wealth, drawing on experience within and outside sub-Saharan Africa and referring closely to the latest analysis and policy advice in this area by the IMF, the World Bank, and leading academic research. A key feature of each chapter is a recommended reading list for those who wish additional, more in-depth material on these issues to further inform policymakers and other stakeholders on the theoretical and analytical underpinnings of the policy advice.
Jean-Pierre Briffaut, Mr. George Iden, Mr. Peter C. Hayward, Mr. Tonny Lybek, Mr. Hassanali Mehran, Mr. Piero Ugolini, and Mr. Stephen M Swaray

Abstract

This study takes stock of progress made so far in the financial sectors of sub-saharan African countries. It recommends further reforms and specific measures in the areas of supervision, development of monetary operations and financial markets, external sector liberalization, central bank autonomy and accountability, payments system, and central bank accounting and auditing.

David M. Sassoon

The World Bank Group may now be expected to increase its lending to the mining sector. The pressure to find and develop new mineral resources is increasing the risk of mining ventures at every stage. The author, a Bank attorney, discusses previous lending for mining in the context of guarantees both to mining companies and to the developing countries where the mines are located.

Mr. Joachim Harnack, Mr. Sérgio Pereira. Leite, Ms. Stefania Fabrizio, Ms. Luisa Zanforlin, Mr. Girma Begashaw, and Mr. Anthony J. Pellechio

Abstract

This chapter explores the key relationships between participatory democracy and successful economic development and reviews the early steps of participatory decision making in Ghana. More generally, it sets the stage for a discussion of Ghana's main achievements and failures since 1992 in raising the standard of living of its population and reducing poverty. The high-profile political process that launched constitutional democracy in the 1990s and generated Ghana—Vision 2020 placed poverty reduction at the center of economic policy. Based on a set of price and unit labor cost indicators, Ghana's competitiveness improved in the early 1990s through 1994. The evidence for 1995–98 is quite strong. The Bank of Ghana is suspected to have used administrative means and moral suasion to influence the exchange rate, resisting the cedi's depreciation. The terms-of-trade shock forced the Bank of Ghana to focus more clearly on maintaining adequate foreign reserves. The depreciation may then have helped make the foreign exchange market more active and the nominal exchange rate more representative of market conditions.

Mr. Joachim Harnack, Mr. Sérgio Pereira. Leite, Ms. Stefania Fabrizio, Ms. Luisa Zanforlin, Mr. Girma Begashaw, and Mr. Anthony J. Pellechio

Abstract

In 1992 Ghana held its first elections in over a decade, taking a decisive step in the return to democratic rule. Although many countries in Africa moved to democracy in the 1990s, Ghana had reached that point only after a virtual meltdown in the early 1980s. What has been all the more laudable in Ghana’s case is therefore the steady progress since the return to democratic rule in enhancing a democratic environment.

Jean-Pierre Briffaut, Mr. George Iden, Mr. Peter C. Hayward, Mr. Tonny Lybek, Mr. Hassanali Mehran, Mr. Piero Ugolini, and Mr. Stephen M Swaray

Abstract

The countries of sub-Saharan Africa have witnessed a distinct improvement in their economic performance in recent years, with increasing growth rates, declining inflation, and narrowing financial imbalances. The improvement is attributable in large part to the implementation of sound economic, fiscal, and financial policies, including policies to liberalize trade and improve the investment climate. In addition, these countries embarked on fundamental structural reform.

Mr. Joachim Harnack, Mr. Sérgio Pereira. Leite, Ms. Stefania Fabrizio, Ms. Luisa Zanforlin, Mr. Girma Begashaw, and Mr. Anthony J. Pellechio

Abstract

The high-profile political process that launched constitutional democracy in the 1990s and generated Ghana– Vision 2020 placed poverty reduction at the center of economic policy. The main themes of Ghana– Vision 2020 were economic growth, investment in human capital, rural development, and an enabling environment for private entrepreneurship and investment. These themes were carried into the medium-term program for the first five-year period of the strategy, 1996–2000, with human development as the focus for efforts at poverty reduction (Government of Ghana, 1997a). The basic goals in this area were to improve health, life expectancy, and the capabilities of all persons; eliminate extreme deprivation; and ensure an equitable distribution of the benefits of development.

Jean-Pierre Briffaut, Mr. George Iden, Mr. Peter C. Hayward, Mr. Tonny Lybek, Mr. Hassanali Mehran, Mr. Piero Ugolini, and Mr. Stephen M Swaray

Abstract

In virtually all African countries, formal banking began with the establishment or arrival of “colonial” banks, owned by investors from the metropolitan country or from South Africa. These banks offered banking services to colonial enterprises, both those that developed the agricultural cash crop and extractive businesses and those that provided local services, such as oil, retailing, and equipment. They also provided banking services to the manufacturing sector in those countries where one emerged, that is, principally in Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. These banks also offered branch networks that provided savings, money transfers, and some credit facilities to small businesses, salaried employees, and similar borrowers. They did not penetrate the subsistence agricultural sector.