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International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The IMF, an international organization of currently 184 member countries, was established in 1946 to promote international monetary cooperation, exchange stability, and orderly exchange arrangements; to provide temporary financial assistance to countries with balance of payments difficulties; and to foster economic growth and high levels of employment. To achieve these objectives, the IMF carries out three types of operational activities: surveillance, financial assistance, and technical assistance.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This paper discusses Fiscal Year 2003 Annual Report for Japan Administered Account for Selected IMF Activities (JSA). The report consists of a brief description of the IMF and its activities, with a particular focus on its technical assistance activities. It provides greater detail with regard to the JSA and the scholarship programs. It also describes the objectives, size and scope, and use with a focus on fiscal year 2003. The report highlights that in FY2003, JSA financing accounted for 18 percent of total IMF technical assistance, 33 percent of the assistance delivered in the field, and 66 percent of the total external financing.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The Japan-IMF Scholarship Program for Asia is a program for graduate studies in macroeconomics or related fields at various universities in Japan. The program is aimed at promising, young officials in central banks or in ministries of finance, economy, or planning in the Asia, Central Asia, and Pacific regions.9 The program, which is operated under the JSA, offers 12- and 24-month scholarships and is in the process of being expanded from the previous 25 scholarships per year to about 50 scholarships each year. For the academic year 2002, 31 scholarships were awarded.10 There are two forms of scholarships. Scholars accepted under the “partnership track” participate in specially designed courses offered by one of four participating universities,11 while the “open track” is available to candidates who have already been accepted to a graduate-level program in macroeconomics or a related field at any leading university in Japan. The program is currently administered by the IMF’s Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific in Tokyo.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The IMF began to provide technical assistance to its member countries in the early 1960s in response to requests from newly independent nations in Africa and Asia. By the mid-1980s, resources devoted to technical assistance had nearly doubled. As a result of the expansion of the IMF’s membership and the adoption of market-oriented economies by a large number of countries worldwide, IMF technical assistance activities grew even more rapidly in the early 1990s. The demand increased further in the late 1990s as significant technical assistance resources had to be directed to countries hit by financial crisis. In addition, in recent years, the IMF has had to mount significant efforts to provide prompt policy advice and operational assistance to countries emerging from conflict situations. Currently, the IMF devotes some 350 person years to technical assistance activities, plus some $10 million for training and scholarships annually.5 The delivery of IMF technical assistance over the period FY1998–FY2003 is shown in Figure 1.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Japan has provided grant contributions to support the IMF’s technical assistance to member countries since 1990. In 1997, the administered account was amended in order to widen the scope of activities for which contributions could be made to finance other IMF activities in Asia and the Pacific carried out through its Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific in Tokyo.

S O, S S, and E V

Abstract

After the breakup of the Soviet Union, the CIS-7 faced exceptional challenges in building new states, democratic institutions, and market economies. All of the CIS-7 started from a situation of complex dependency on the Soviet Union, including massive transfers and subsidies and the trade arrangements of the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance (CMEA). The shocks associated with the breakup—notably the disruption of economic relations with established regional partners, termination of large fiscal transfers, and severe energy price adjustments—compounded the problems of severe structural rigidities and weak institutions.

Constantine Michalopoulos

Abstract

More effective integration into the world trading system is part of the transition from central planning to markets. Based on market forces, international trade promotes more efficient resource allocation and increased productivity and growth—necessary conditions for sustainable poverty alleviation. The low-income CIS-7 countries started the transition with different resource endowments but with similar protectionist policies that isolated their economies from the rest of the world and created large distortions in prices and resource allocation.

David Kennedy, Samuel Fankhauser, and Martin Raiser

Abstract

Energy and water have emerged as critical issues for the CIS-7 countries—Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, the Kyrgyz Republic, Moldova, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan—and their neighbors for at least two reasons. The first is that energy and water constitute the region’s main natural resources, and the exploitation of both was and still is a key to these countries’ mode of production. The second is that the distribution of these resources is very unequal across countries. Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan benefit from rich energy reserves, while Armenia, Georgia, the Kyrgyz Republic, and Tajikistan have substantial water resources. This unequal distribution gives rise to potential gains from trade but it is also the source of recurrent conflict between neighboring states in the region. Energy and water issues are closely linked given that the latter can be used, inter alia, for hydropower generation and/or irrigation. Use of water in the municipal sector is not discussed in this chapter. Replenishment of the Aral Sea as an alternative to irrigation is consistent with increased winter hydro generation, discussed below under “Unlocking the Benefits from Trade.”

Mr. Thomas Helbling, Mr. Ashoka Mody, and Ms. Ratna Sahay

Abstract

With the exception of Azerbaijan, which is a net energy exporter, the other low-income CIS countries—Armenia, Georgia, the Kyrgyz Republic, Moldova, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan—face serious external debt problems.1 From a situation of virtually no debt in 1992, a meteoric increase in debt levels occurred thereafter. In particular, multilateral (IMF and World Bank) lending contributed to the high and increasingly unsustainable levels of debt, despite close monitoring by these institutions undertaken through their conditionality. The CIS-7 experience contrasts with that of other transition economies, which have managed the transition without similar debt accumulation, and is more akin to that of the poorer, highly indebted countries that are heavily reliant on official credit.2

Philip R. Lane

Abstract

Without doubt, the collapse of the communist bloc and the dissolution of the Soviet Union during 1989–1991 represented the largest regime change experienced in the world since the 1940s. In terms of economic policy, the countries that emerged from the Soviet bloc faced major challenges in terms of re-molding institutions and markets to deliver growth and prosperity for their citizens. The scale of the adjustment problem was most acute for the countries in the former Soviet Union. These countries had economic structures that were directed toward fulfilling specialized roles within the Soviet central planning system: for this group, the challenge of building self-functioning market-based economies was especially severe.