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International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Delivered at the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW) as part of the Institute’s Europe Lecture Series in Berlin, Germany, on March 26, 2018

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Delivered at the annual Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City’s Economic Policy Symposium in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, on August 27, 2011

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Delivered at the National Democratic Institute’s “Madeleine K. Albright Award Luncheon” in Washington, DC, on May 19, 2014

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Delivered at Guildhall as part of the World Traders’ Tacitus Lecture series in London on February 28, 2019

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Delivered at the Grandes Conférences Catholiques in Brussels on June 17, 2015

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Delivered at the Library of Congress as part of the Library’s Henry A. Kissinger Lecture Series in Washington, DC, on December 4, 2018

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Delivered at the CD. Howe Institute in Toronto, Canada, on September 13, 2016

Mr. Michael Keen

Abstract

One of the great ironies of intellectual history is that Adam Smith, the apostle of free trade, ended his days as a Comptroller of Customs. By the same token, it may seem strange that the International Monetary Fund (IMF), committed to the principles of free trade, should devote a good deal of its technical assistance activities to strengthening the performance of customs administrations. In each case, however, the explanation is easily found. For Smith, the position of Comptroller at Kircaldy, a post his father had also held, was an attractive sinecure (as customs posts continue to be in all too many countries). For the IMF, the support of improvement in customs administration reflects the recognition that although customs administration would wither away in an ideal world, in practice trade taxes are likely to be a significant source of revenue for many of its members, especially developing countries, for the foreseeable future; and that if trade taxes are to be levied, it is best that this be in a way that does least collateral damage to international trade flows.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Born in Paris in 1956, Christine Lagarde completed high school in Le Havre and attended Holton-Arms School in Bethesda, Maryland (USA). She then graduated from law school at University Paris X and obtained a master’s degree from the Political Science Institute in Aix-en-Provence.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Delivered at the Institute of Politics at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on October 5, 2017