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International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

Abstract

The global economy is emerging from recession, but the recovery is expected to be sluggish. While financial conditions have continued to improve, many markets remain highly dependent on public support, and downside risks prevail. In the United States and many advanced economies, growth and employment will remain weak in coming years. In turn, Canada has shown comparative resilience despite sizable shocks. A permanent loss in potential output, weak private consumption, and much higher debt levels in the United States will be negative legacies of the crisis that could adversely affect the Latin America and Caribbean region.

Mr. Joseph Gold

Abstract

The Articles of Agreement (Articles) of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the practices of the IMF under that treaty are the principal sources of public international law on the exchange rates of the currencies of member states (members) of the IMF. By the end of September 1990, there were 154 members, among which a great variety of political and economic systems were represented. The most notable nonmembers were the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and Switzerland, but the latter country and a number of other countries have applied for membership.

Mr. Joseph Gold

Abstract

The fluctuation of exchange rates has given rise to problems of allocating the advantage or disadvantage resulting from changes in exchange rates. In one situation, the problem is bilateral, arising between the parties to a transaction or series of transactions. In the case of disagreement between them on the appropriate exchange rate for settlement when there are two or more possible rates, the advantage that one party enjoys because of the rate that is chosen is matched by the correlative disadvantage suffered by the other party. This kind of problem arises in many forms between the parties to a contract. Sometimes, the judicial solution of a problem may depend on interpretation of the contract.1 In other cases, the outcome may depend on the interpretation of an international convention,2 or the way in which a particular legal concept, such as restitutio in integrum, is applied.3 In some cases, courts have relied on the proposition that a party should have taken steps to protect itself against exchange risk in accordance with the normal practice of the trade in which the transaction or transactions occur.4 It may even be possible to imply a term that a party is to behave in this way.