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International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This paper focuses on goal setting for development of the world. The paper highlights that the goals come from the agreements and resolutions of the world conferences organized by the United Nations in the first half of the 1990s. The paper focuses on seven goals that cover poverty, education, gender equality, infant and child mortality, maternal mortality, reproductive health, and environment. Each of the seven goals addresses an aspect of poverty. The paper also emphasizes that these goals should be viewed together because they are mutually reinforcing.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper presents the views of Michel Camdessus, Managing Director of the IMF, on how the IMF can face new challenges. Camdessus believes that the key responsibility for resolving debt difficulties lies with the indebted countries themselves. They need to be more resolute in adopting and implementing sound macroeconomic policies and bold structural reforms. Camdessus states that the IMF has available US$12 billion to support adjustment in the low-income countries through the structural adjustment facility and the enhanced structural adjustment facility.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Goal: Enrol all children in primary school by 2015

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Goal: Implement national strategies for sustainable development by 2005 so as to reverse the loss of environmental resources by 2015

Mr. Robert J. Corker and Ms. Wanda S Tseng

Abstract

This study examines the financial reforms undertaken by nine Asian countries in the 1980s (Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, and Thailand) and their implications for money demand and monetary policy.

John R. Karlik, Mr. Michael W. Bell, M. Martin, S. Rajcoomar, and Charles Adair Sisson

Abstract

This book, by a staff team in the IMF Institute, contains a series of workshops that introduce the process of formulating a hypothetical macroeconomic and structural adjustment program, which is a central element in the financial programming courses offered by the IMF Institute. In addition to elaborating key concepts for the four major sectoral accounts, the workshops are designed to allow the development of a step by step reference scenario for Sri Lanka.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Goal: Empower women and eliminate gender disparities in primary and secondary education by 2005

John R. Karlik, Mr. Michael W. Bell, M. Martin, S. Rajcoomar, and Charles Adair Sisson

Abstract

The island of Sri Lanka has a population of 17 million (about the same as Australia, Malaysia, or the Netherlands) and a land area roughly twice the size of the Netherlands. Its per capita GDP is $425 (1990), and it has become known as a country whose social welfare indicators are considerably superior to those of most countries with comparable income levels.1

John R. Karlik, Mr. Michael W. Bell, M. Martin, S. Rajcoomar, and Charles Adair Sisson

Abstract

Macroeconomic statistics provide the basic information used to determine a country’s level of economic activity, assess the economy’s performance, and forecast future developments. A reliable set of statistics is thus indispensable to policymakers. Typically, four distinct but closely related statistical systems provide the core of the needed information: the national income and product accounts, the balance of payments, the government finance statistics, and consolidated banking system accounts.1 For countries where the state owns a considerable number of business operations, it is useful to supplement these data with the accounts of the state enterprises in order to determine the influence these enterprises have on the economy, but comprehensive data are not always available.

John R. Karlik, Mr. Michael W. Bell, M. Martin, S. Rajcoomar, and Charles Adair Sisson

Abstract

A financial program (also called an adjustment program) is a comprehensive and consistent set of policy measures designed to achieve a given set of macroeconomic objectives. Financial programming is the process of designing these measures, which a country is generally required to develop before receiving financial support from the IMF. However, financial programming can be used in any situation in which national authorities desire to formulate an internally consistent set of macroeconomic policies aimed at maintaining or improving economic performance. Frequently, the policies are designed to correct disequilibria between aggregate domestic demand and supply, imbalances that are typically reflected in balance of payments problems, rising inflation, and low output growth.