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Mr. Masahiro Nozaki, Mr. Tobias Roy, Mr. Pawel Dyczewski, Mr. Bernhard Fritz-Krockow, Ms. Fanny M Torres Gavela, Mr. Gamal Z El-Masry, and Mr. Rafael A Portillo
This paper analyzes the economic growth and stability in Suriname. The paper highlights that in recent years, the outlook has turned substantively more positive. The favorable external environment and the stability-oriented policies of the Venetian administration have boosted confidence in the economy, leading to increased investment, domestic economic activity, and employment. The recent boom in commodity prices has helped boost growth, while increased gold production and investment in the mineral industry are projected to support continued growth in the coming years.
International Monetary Fund

This 2004 Article IV Consultation highlights that tighter fiscal and monetary policies in Suriname helped stabilize the exchange rate and moderate inflation pressures in 2003 and 2004. The fiscal deficit narrowed from 6.5 percent of GDP in 2002 to near balance in 2003, while a tighter monetary policy helped to reduce inflation from 28 percent in 2002 to 13 percent in 2003. The financial system has become increasingly dollarized in recent years, reflecting the lingering effects on confidence of earlier episodes of price instability, as well as regulatory changes favoring foreign currency intermediation.

International Monetary Fund

This 2009 Article IV Consultation highlights that economic activity weakened in Suriname in 2009 in the context of lower alumina and oil prices and a sharp output decline in the alumina sector. However, economic growth is estimated to have remained positive at 2.5 percent, supported by buoyant activity in the gold and construction sectors. Inflation has fallen sharply. Executive Directors have welcomed the authorities’ decision to postpone the reduction in the corporate tax rate, as this would adversely affect tax collections.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This Selected Issues paper focuses on constructing a high-frequency economic growth indicator for Suriname. Most economic data for Suriname are available only with a substantial time lag and on a low-frequency basis, impeding such analyses. This paper presents a simple econometric model that closely approximates GDP in recent years. The model estimates are used to construct a monthly indicator of economic activity for Suriname. The indicator provides information about the pace of economic activity close to real time, typically with a one- to two-month lag.
International Monetary Fund
In this paper, the economic growth of Suriname is discussed. The fiscal deficit shifted from 2.2 percent to 3.3 percent of GDP during 2009–10. In 2010, CLICO-Suriname was acquired by a local insurance company. The need to rein in current expenditure and avoid development of wage–price inflation and strengthen the social support programs are stressed by the authorities. The introduction of VAT and other systems are discussed. Finally, improvement over the business environment to facilitate the development of the private sector and global economy was encouraged.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This 2019 Article IV Consultation with Suriname discusses that Suriname continues to grow steadily with low inflation. However, there has been little progress in implementing urgently needed fiscal reforms, and the fiscal position is likely to continue to weaken in the coming year. The consultation focused on policies to bolster the economy in the medium term. These include fiscal measures to enhance revenues and efficiency and lower expenditures, policies to improve the monetary and financial sector supervision frameworks, and structural policies to boost potential growth. Advances have been made in developing the central bank’s monetary tools and facilities; however, more is needed to strengthen the credibility of the monetary framework. The banking sector faces important downside risks and there are gaps in the central bank’s supervisory and resolution framework. It is advised to put the public debt on a sustainable path. A significant reduction in the fiscal deficit could be achieved by implementing a value-added tax, curtailing electricity subsidies except to the poor, and improving public financial management.
International Monetary Fund
In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
Suriname is recovering from the deep recession of 2015-16. Growth has turned positive, inflation has reduced to single digits, real interest rates have turned positive, and the external position has on balance strengthened. Nonetheless, the economy remains heavily dependent on the mineral sector, and faces fiscal, monetary, and banking sector vulnerabilities.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This 2013 Article IV Consultation highlights that Suriname’s macroeconomic performance has strengthened markedly over the past decade. Since 2000, stronger policies and buoyant commodity prices, supported by political stability, have helped improve macroeconomic performance, enabling Suriname to enjoy several recent upgrades from major ratings agencies. With gold prices declining after a long upswing, the main challenges are to strengthen institutions and adjust policies to avoid the onset of a boom–bust cycle. Growth remains robust although inflation has declined considerably. In 2012 GDP grew an estimated 4.75 percent, similar to 2011 and among the highest in the region, supported by buoyant commodity prices, particularly gold.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This paper mainly discusses the IMF-supported program aimed at restoring macroeconomic stability and confidence in Suriname’s economy. The proposed 24-month Stand-By Arrangement (265 percent of quota, or SDR 342 million) aims to support Suriname’s adjustment to the fall in commodity export prices and restore external and fiscal sustainability. It foresees an improvement of the fiscal balance by 7.4 percent of GDP, which would reverse the rise in the government debt-to-GDP ratio; restore foreign reserves to adequate levels—four months of imports; and reflect a monetary policy stance calibrated to reduce inflation to single digits. It also strengthens the foundations for private-sector growth.