Browse

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for :

Clear All
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.

International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This paper focuses on Economic Development and Poverty Reduction Strategy (EDPRS) 2013–2018 for Rwanda. Ownership of the EDPRS by a wide range of stakeholders at national level has been a key factor of success. The EDPRS 2 has integrated inclusiveness and sustainability as driving factors in elaborating the strategy. Community-based solutions, working closely with the population, have made possible fast-track and cost-effective implementation and increased demand for accountability, in education with the 9YBE construction of classrooms, the Crop Intensification Program in agriculture, and community-based health care programs.
International Monetary Fund
Rwanda’s Second and Third Reviews Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility, and Request for Waiver of Performance Criteria are discussed. After an extended period characterized by a strong expansion of economic activity, real GDP growth is estimated by the IMF staff to have slowed to 0.9 percent in 2003. On the structural side, performance criteria on the revision of the tax law and preparation of the financial instructions for more effective expenditure management have been met.
International Monetary Fund
Rwanda’s Economic Development and Poverty Reduction Strategy provides a medium-term framework for achieving the country’s long-term development goals and aspirations as embodied in Rwanda Vision 2020, the seven-year Government of Rwanda programme, and the Millennium Development Goals. The strategy promotes three flagship programs, namely sustainable growth for jobs and exports, poverty reduction by promoting pro-poor components of the national growth agenda, and providing an anchor for pro-poor growth by building on low incidence of corruption and a regional comparative advantage in soft infrastructure.
International Monetary Fund
The Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper II (PRSP-II) examines the major development challenges faced by Burundi. The paper identifies achievements in areas such as security and governance, but draws attention to the below-par performance in overall economic growth and development. The primary reasons for the lack of development have been cited in the report. The four major strategic pillars of the PRSP-II provide a road-map for achieving the goals and objectives enunciated to put Burundi on the path toward sustainable development.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This Selected Issues paper on West African Economic and Monetary Union presents external stability assessment report. The current account deficit declined in 2014. Although gross international reserve coverage has increased slightly, part of the current account deficit has been financed by a decline in commercial banks’ net foreign assets. Contingent on the implementation of government’s consolidation plans, and helped by a favorable oil price outlook, the current account deficit would further gradually decline and be matched by enough financial inflows in the medium term. According to various metrics, the real exchange rate appears to be broadly aligned with fundamentals. International reserve coverage should increase to provide stronger buffers against immediate short-term risks. Structural competitiveness and investment efficiency improvements will be essential to ensure that the planned large investment programs translate into growth and export gains as well as increased private inflows into the region.
Delphine Prady and Mouhamadou Sy
This paper documents the additional spending that is required for sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) to achieve meaningful progress in SDGs by 2030. Benin and Rwanda are presented in detail through case studies. The main lessons are: i) average additional spending across SSA is significant, at 19 percent of GDP in 2030; ii) countries must prioritize their development objectives according to their capacity to deliver satisfactory outcomes, iii) financing strategies should articulate multiple sources given the scale of additional spending, and iv) strong national ownership of SDGs is key and should be reflected in long-term development plans and medium-term policy commitments.
Max Watson, Ms. Christina Daseking, and Mr. Craig Beaumont

Finland’s economy has rebounded impressively from a deep crisis in the early 1990s, and its public finances have been rebuilt. On this sound foundation, the authorities face new challenges in the coming decade, including the impact of a rapidly aging population, risks of overheating in the real economy and asset markets, and high structural unemployment.