Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 25 items for :

  • Social Science x
  • Globalization: General x
Clear All
Leila Janah and Finbarr Livesey

Finance and Development, September 2017

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Much of the resistance to institutionalized globalization and international financial cooperation and trade has focused on the World Bank, the IMF, and the World Trade Organization (WTO). These institutions, in turn, face a dilemma: how to fulfill the role the international community has assigned to them while at the same time responding to the sometimes conflicting interests between and within member countries. This dilemma was the basis for discussion at the April 4 annual meeting of the Bretton Woods Committee—a U.S.-based bipartisan, nonprofit group organized to build public understanding of international financial and development issues. Participants at the Washington meeting included senior officials from international financial institutions, government officials, and representatives from the private sector and nongovernment organizations.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

In a speech to staff from the IMF and the World Bank on February 20, Cardinal Oscar Andrés Rodriguez, Archbishop of Tegucigalpa, identified corruption as the number one global threat. Cardinal Rodriguez, who was welcomed to the IMF event by IMF Deputy Managing Director Eduardo Aninat, has launched a number of anti-corruption and social justice initiatives of the Catholic Church in Honduras. He has also been a strong promoter of civil society involvement in the poverty reduction strategy process. His presentation was part of the IMF’s ongoing efforts to improve its dialogue with religious and civil society organizations.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Following are edited excerpts of the September 26 opening address of the Annual Meetings Chair, Trevor Andrew Manuel, Governor of the IMF and the World Bank for South Africa.

Mr. George T. Abed and Mr. Hamid R Davoodi

Abstract

The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) is an economically diverse region. Despite undertaking economic reforms in many countries, and having considerable success in avoiding crises and achieving macroeconomic stability, the region’s economic performance in the past 30 years has been below potential. This paper takes stock of the region’s relatively weak performance, explores the reasons for this out come, and proposes an agenda for urgent reforms.

Mr. George T. Abed and Mr. Hamid R Davoodi

Abstract

The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) is an economically diverse region that includes countries with a common heritage, vastly different levels of per capita income, and a common set of challenges (see Box 1). Historically, dependence on oil wealth in many countries and a legacy of central planning in other countries have played major roles in shaping the region’s development strategies.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Alassane D. Ouattara, a Côte d’lvoire national, is resigning as Deputy Managing Director of the IMF, a position he has held since July 1994. He was Director of the IMF’s African Department from 1984 to 1988 (and was appointed a Counsellor of the IMF in 1987), Governor of the Banque Central des Etats de l’Afrique de l’Ouest from 1988 to 1990, and Prime Minister of Côte d’lvoire from 1990 to 1993. Ouattara spoke with Laura Wallace of the IMF’s External Relations Department about the world economy, debt relief, conflict prevention, social issues, and the IMF’s changing role.

International Working Group on External Debt Statistics
This issue of Finance & Development examines the good and bad sides of globalization. Sebastian Mallaby notes that after decades of increasing cross-border movements of capital, goods, and people, only migration continues apace. Capital flows have collapsed, and trade has stagnated. However, rather than a sign of retreat, trade and finance may be resetting to a more sustainable level consistent with continued globalization. IMF Chief Economist Maurice Obstfeld takes a closer look at trade. Ismaila Dieng profiles Leonard Wantchekon, a former activist who plans to train the next generation of African economists. Wantchekon, now a professor at Princeton University, is one of the few African economists teaching at a top US university. His research, which has received considerable attention from development economists, focuses on the political and historical roots of economic development in Africa.