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International Monetary Fund. Secretary's Department

Abstract

The period from May 2013 through April 2014—the IMF’s financial year 20141—saw the world economy reach a critical juncture: emerging from the greatest financial crisis in almost a hundred years. Recovery was taking hold but was too slow and faced many obstacles along the road. In her Global Policy Agenda, the IMF’s Managing Director set out bold policy steps that could overcome these obstacles and take the global economy toward more rapid and sustainable growth. The top priority was to strengthen the coherence of the policies and cooperation among policymakers, both at home and across borders: national prosperity and global prosperity are linked and depend, more than ever before, on countries working together. The IMF is indispensable for this global cooperation.

International Monetary Fund. Secretary's Department

Abstract

As FY2014 drew to an end, the world economy was gradually turning the corner of the Great Recession. The recovery was gaining momentum and global financial stability was improving. Yet growth remained too slow and too weak for comfort, and millions of people were still out of jobs. Rising geopolitical risks had injected new concerns.

International Monetary Fund. Secretary's Department

Abstract

Twice a year, the Managing Director’s Global Policy Agenda pulls together the key findings and policy advice from multilateral reports and defines a future agenda for the Fund and its members. The Managing Director’s Global Policy Agenda is discussed by the Executive Board before the Annual and Spring Meetings, prior to the agenda’s presentation to the International Monetary and Financial Committee.

International Monetary Fund. Secretary's Department

Abstract

In the course of overseeing the international monetary system, underpinning programs in member countries, helping countries strengthen their institutions and capacities, and monitoring member countries’ economies, the IMF provides policy advice to member countries on a variety of issues pertaining to economic stability.

International Monetary Fund. Secretary's Department

Abstract

The current income model for the IMF, endorsed by the Executive Board and approved by the Board of Governors in 2008, includes the establishment of an endowment in the IMF’s Investment Account funded from the profits of the sale of a limited portion of the institution’s gold holdings (see “Gold Sales” later in the chapter). The account’s objective is to invest these resources and generate returns to contribute support to the IMF’s budget while preserving the endowment’s long-term real value. A broadening of the IMF’s investment authority to enhance returns on investments is a key element of the model. In January 2013, the Executive Board adopted new rules and regulations for the Investment Account that provided the legal framework for implementation of the expanded investment authority, authorized under the Fifth Amendment to the Articles of Agreement, which became effective in February 2011.74

Vaclav Havel

Abstract

Let me welcome all of you to the Czech Republic and to Prague. My welcome extends to the official participants in the Annual Meeting of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank Group, to all business people, bankers, economists, political scientists, environmentalists, thinkers, journalists, and, indeed, to all people of good will who have come here because this is an occasion to discuss and possibly also to help determine our common future. This country and its capital city are greatly honored to be the venue of this major assembly, which brings together thousands of people from all countries and continents—including persons wielding a far-reaching influence—in the very year that the commonly used chronology views as a turn of ages. For us it means an honor, a joy, as well as a great challenge, and a major commitment. I trust that Prague—hosting such a gathering of a truly global significance for the first time in more than a thousand years of its history—will offer a good environment for the deliberations and will be reflected favorably both in the memory of its participants and in the history of global cooperation. Surely this city possesses certain historical prerequisites. Over the course of centuries—among other things because of its geographical position in the center of Europe—it has witnessed not only confrontations and conflicts but also creative encounters, mutual respect, reciprocal influence, and cooperation among various cultures; various peoples and ethnic groups; and various spiritual currents and social movements. This pluralism has helped to shape its visage. It would be good if, after decades of oppression, of life without freedom, of bent backs, and of imposed isolation, we succeeded in rediscovering this ancient tradition and offered this city as a congenial setting for the world’s open debate about itself.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Meetings of the Joint Development Committee were held jointly with the Board of Governors of the Bank. The sessions of the Annual Meetings were held jointly with the Boards of Governors of the World Bank Group.

CHRISTOPHER M. TOWE

Competing hypotheses about what causes excessive exchange rate volatility—speculative bubbles or “fundamental” economic variables—are examined for the Lebanese pound during its protracted depreciation from end-1982 to November 1987 and its marked appreciation over the following six months. Reduced–form and time–series models of the exchange rate are estimated and tested for nonstationarity. The results suggest that much of the pound’s volatility was consistent with excessive growth in domestic-versus foreign-currency-denominated liquidity rather than speculation.[JEL 431]

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
Asia Leading the Way explores how the region is moving into a leadership role in the world economy. The issue looks at Asia's biggest economy, China, which has relied heavily on exports to grow, and its need to increase domestic demand and to promote global integration if it is to continue to thrive. China is not the only Asian economy that heavily depends on exports and all of them might take some cues from the region's second-biggest economy, India, which has a highly developed services sector. Min Zhu, the new Special Advisor to the IMF's Managing Director, talks about Asia in the global economy, the global financial crisis, correcting imbalances, and the IMF in Asia. And "People in Economics" profiles an Asian crusader for corporate governance, Korea's Jang Hasung. This issue of F&D also covers how best to reform central banking in the aftermath of the global economic crisis; the pernicious effects of derivatives trading on municipal government finances in Europe and the United States; and some ominous news for governments hoping to rely on better times to help them reduce their debt burdens. Mohamed El-Erian argues that sovereign wealth funds are well-placed to navigate the new global economy that will emerge following the world wide recession. "Back to Basics" explains supply and demand. "Data Spotlight" explores the continuing weakness in bank credit. And "Picture This" focuses on the high, and growing, cost of energy subsidies.