Browse

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for :

  • Industries: Manufacturing x
Clear All
International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
This Selected Issues paper provides an overview of income distribution and the welfare system in Ireland, with a focus on the crisis and postcrisis periods. Ireland’s flexible economy and strong social safety net helped mitigate the adverse effects of the property-driven crisis. Although economic conditions are improving rapidly, lifting employment, ongoing efforts are needed to address the lingering impact on those hardest hit, including the long-term unemployed and unemployed youth. Consistent efforts are needed to support sustainable and inclusive growth and meet ambitious social targets, including the reduction of consistent poverty to 2 percent by 2020.
International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues paper examines the competitiveness of the Irish manufacturing sector. The paper highlights that in 2001, production cuts and accelerating wage growth arrested the trend improvement in external competitiveness, but the level remains high. The paper presents some medium-term fiscal scenarios. It discusses indicators of financial system soundness based on official data and publications, as well as discussions with the authorities. The paper also examines indicators on the vulnerability and solvency of the financial system and presents a brief description of supervision arrangements.
Ms. Valerie Cerra and Mr. Jarkko Soikkeli
Ireland has had significant competitiveness gains in the 1990s on the basis of the standard manufacturing unit labor cost-based measure of the real effective exchange rate. A handful of sectors mostly dominated by multinational companies have accounted for the bulk of value added in production. Their productivity gains have greatly contributed to Ireland's exceptional growth performance in the 1990s, which has earned it the nickname of "Celtic Tiger." However, these sectors represent a disproportionately smaller share of manufacturing employment, and competitiveness in employment-intensive sectors has been much weaker. This paper thus explores Irish competitiveness from the viewpoint of risks to employment.
Jesmin Rahman and Mr. Tianli Zhao
One of the most important recent developments in international trade is the increasing interconnectedness of export production through a vertical trading chain network that streches across many countries, with each country specializing in particular stages of a good’s production. Using value added trade statistics, this paper tries to dissect and reshape understanding of European exports: where exports values are created, the role of vertical supply links in export growth, what is contributing to the growth in supply links, and how comparative advantages of countries are affected by supply links over time. Our analysis finds strong role of supply links in cross-country export performance in Europe, where these links between countries grew based on physical proximity, cost differential and similarity in export structure.
International Monetary Fund

This paper considers elements of macroeconomic policy central to Ireland’s objective of being among the first countries to enter into European Economic and Monetary Union. The paper analyzes the main determinants of the Irish pound/sterling exchange rate, an issue brought to the fore by the currency turbulence of March 1995, which saw a sterling-inspired decline in the Irish pound against the deutsche mark. It also considers fiscal developments and prospects, highlighting tax reform measures undertaken to accelerate job creation, the growth of spending in recent years, and the medium-term fiscal outlook.

International Monetary Fund

This paper considers elements of macroeconomic policy central to Ireland’s objective of being among the first countries to enter into European Economic and Monetary Union. The paper analyzes the main determinants of the Irish pound/sterling exchange rate, an issue brought to the fore by the currency turbulence of March 1995, which saw a sterling-inspired decline in the Irish pound against the deutsche mark. It also considers fiscal developments and prospects, highlighting tax reform measures undertaken to accelerate job creation, the growth of spending in recent years, and the medium-term fiscal outlook.

International Monetary Fund

The Selected Issues paper analyzes how fast Ireland will grow in the future. The approach of this paper is to consider the catch-up in labor utilization productivity and use independent demographic projections and other considerations to make reasonable assumptions about labor productivity and utilization growth in the future. It uses a simple growth-accounting framework, and discusses the trends in labor utilization and productivity per hour in the past. The paper also describes the spectacular boom of the Irish housing market and its key drivers from an international perspective.

International Monetary Fund

This Selected Issues paper and Statistical Appendix on Ireland examines the productivity growth in Irish traded and nontraded goods, and provides some rough estimates of the sort of wage and inflation differentials that would be predicted by a Balassa–Samuelson framework under certain growth assumptions for the future. The paper provides a framework for judging what sort of wage growth and inflation could be sustained over the medium term without leading to a loss of competitiveness. The paper also examines traded and nontraded productivity in Ireland.