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Mr. Stijn Claessens and Erik Feijen

The Two Faces of Financial Globalization looks at the phenomenon of rising cross-border financial flows-credited with boosting growth in developing countries but also blamed for the emerging market crises of the late 1980s and 1990s. The lead article puts together a framework for analyzing studies about the costs and benefits of financial globalization. Other articles look at the worldwide allocation of capital, the role of finance in macroeconomic management, and changes in the investor base. "Picture This" illustrates the growth and direction of capital flows. One guest contributor describes India's capital account liberalization, and another looks at how participants in international finance can cope with a fluid financial landscape. "People in Economics" profiles Guillermo Calvo; "Back to Basics" explains the difference between the purchasing power parity exchange rate and market exchange rates as measures of global economic growth; and "Country Focus" spotlights Australia.

International Monetary Fund

The Eritrean economy continues to be adversely affected by the effects of the border conflict with Ethiopia. In other structural reform areas, the government seems to have further increased state control over the economy. The authorities confirmed their commitment to strengthen the role of the private sector, but they believed that the sector was not yet ready to take the lead in a number of critical areas. The preparation of a medium-term macroeconomic outlook was beset by a number of difficulties, including, in particular, the lack of timely and reliable data.

International Monetary Fund
This paper assesses Ethiopia’s Second Review Under the Three-Year Arrangement Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF), and Requests for Augmentation of Access and for Waiver of Performance Criterion, and Second Annual Program. Performance under the first annual PRGF-supported program was satisfactory in the context of Ethiopia’s steady progress toward peace with Eritrea. All quantitative and structural performance criteria through October 2001 were observed, with the exception of the adjusted performance criterion on the net domestic assets of the National Bank of Ethiopia, for which the authorities request a waiver.
International Monetary Fund
This paper assesses Ethiopia’s 2002 Article IV Consultation and Third Review Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF) Arrangement. Performance under the first annual PRGF-supported program was good, and the second annual program remains on track. All the quantitative and structural performance criteria and benchmarks for December 2001 and March 2002 were met, with the exception of the revised regulation for the provisioning by banks for nonperforming loans, which was adopted, but was not fully in line with international best practice, as had been envisaged.
International Monetary Fund

The Eritrean economy continues to be adversely affected by the effects of the border conflict with Ethiopia. In other structural reform areas, the government seems to have further increased state control over the economy. The authorities confirmed their commitment to strengthen the role of the private sector, but they believed that the sector was not yet ready to take the lead in a number of critical areas. The preparation of a medium-term macroeconomic outlook was beset by a number of difficulties, including, in particular, the lack of timely and reliable data.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

In a vigorous endorsement of the regional approach to technical assistance delivery and its responsiveness to member country needs, IMF Managing Director Rodrigo de Rato recently announced that a third Africa Regional Technical Assistance Center (AFRITAC), for Central African countries, could be established if the requisite external funding could be secured to complement the IMF’s contribution. The IMF’s decision follows an independent evaluation of the first phase of operations at the East and West AFRITACs and an IMF Executive Board review of the effectiveness of the IMF’s five regional technical assistance centers worldwide. Executive Directors cited the important contribution that these centers make to the IMF’s technical assistance program and lauded donors for their support, which has been crucial not only in providing financing but also in building broader country ownership of reforms and strengthening coordination of capacity-building efforts in member countries. The review also provides the basis for the East and West AFRITACs to move forward with an ambitious agenda in their second phase of operations.